The Civil War?

Federal Soldiers Dead Federal soldiers on battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Title: Incidents of the war. A harvest of death, Gettysburg, July, 1863 - by Timothy H. O'Sullivan, from Selected Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 (Library of Congress) (See Reference 1.)
Confederate Soldiers Antietam, Md. Confederate dead by a fence on the Hagerstown road, Antietam, September, 1862 - by Alexander Gardner, from Selected Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 (Library of Congress) (See Reference 2.)

These two photographs were downloaded from the Library of Congress. There are more than 1100 photographs from the Civil War available for viewing or downloading.

US Flag Old Men, Young Men, and War CSA Flag

All the old men argue - slavery is the issue
Some old men yield - what's the harm
All the old men agree - slavery in the South

All the fine young men - believe in a cause
All the fine young men - gone to war
All the fine young men - not afraid to take a stand
Some fine young men - dead because

Some old men yielded - afraid to take a stand

Excerpt from a much longer verse written by a Veteran


Playing: American Trilogy

Tucker Relatives in the Civil War

I have discovered that several Tucker relatives served in the Civil War. For the Confederate service of the following men click on their name.
John Bowen Tucker, our great-great grandfather
Jesse C. Tucker, a brother of John Bowen Tucker
Benjamin C. Tucker, a son of Jesse and a nephew of John Bowen Tucker
James W. Tucker, a son of Jesse, a nephew of John Bowen Tucker, and a brother of Benjamin C. Tucker
Rev. George Tucker, a brother of John Bowen Tucker
Rev. Jeremiah H. Tucker, a son of Rev. George Tucker and a nephew of John Bowen Tucker
Andrew F. Tucker, a son of Rev. George Tucker and a nephew of John Bowen Tucker

For a possible Union connection to the Tucker family click on
Green B. Tucker.

MS Flag  John Bowen Tucker and his brother Jesse Clifton Tucker in the Civil War

We received information about John Bowen Tucker suffering wounds while serving with Confederate forces. His daughter, Sarah Elizabeth Tucker told this to her grandchild many years ago (Reference 3). On a recent visit to the Genealogical Society of DeSoto County Library, located in the Courthouse in Hernando, Mississippi, we found a book (Reference 4a) compiled by members of that society. This book contained the names of residents of DeSoto County that served in the Civil War. We found that Private John B. Tucker and Private Jesse C. Tucker had served with Company A, Blythe Cavalry. (Although Jesse lived in Marshall County it is not surprising to find his name with Blythe's Cavalry, since many men from neighboring counties joined up with this cavalry unit.) What is interesting about these two men serving in the war is that when the war started - John was 42 years old, had fathered 10 children, with seven still alive, and the oldest one at home was 12 years old. Jesse was 40 years old, had fathered 9 children all still alive, and the oldest was 16. (Also, see Reference 4b for a listing of DeSoto County Soldiers in the Confederate Army.)

Reference 4 also contained a newspaper article (Reference 5) that gave more information on the Blythe Cavalry. The cavalry was commanded by Col. Green L. Blythe, and during the course of the war Col. Blythe commanded three units - First Cavalry Battalion, State Troops; First Cavalry Regiment, State Troops; and the Second Cavalry Regiment, Partisan Rangers. The term "State Troops" means that these troops were all from Mississippi and never placed under control by Confederate (other states) officers. From the newspaper article and information obtained from Reference 6, the following story about Blythe's Cavalry unfolds.

First Cavalry Battalion, State Troops was organized in September 1862 under the command of Maj. Green L. Blythe (later promoted to Colonel); this battalion was also know as First Cavalry Battalion, Minute Men. Later, the battalion was increased in size and was reorganized as First Cavalry Regiment, State Troops on April 29, 1863. Blythe was promoted to Colonel to lead the new regiment. Still later the Confederate Congress passed an act authorizing partisan rangers, and the new regiment was sometimes known as Second Partisan Rangers Regiment. There are some indications that the unit was disbanded for reorganization in late 1863 or early 1864, but Reference 5 states that Blythe was commanding two companies of State Troops as late as 1864 and 1865. The lieutenants of these two companies are the same ones listed in Reference 6.

According to Reference 5, the cavalry performed various scouting and skirmishing duties in north Mississippi and west Tennessee. On May 19, 1863, Confederate General James R. Chalmers recommended that "the regiment commanded by Col. Green L. Blythe be converted to Confederate troops." The newspaper article provides some insight into the difficulty the Confederate officers had in controlling "State Troops," since they did not have direct command over them.

It has been difficult to trace the Civil War Actions involving the above commands because of the name changes, but we believe that the unit fought in some or all the following actions. Most of the following actions occurred in north Mississippi or west Tennessee, which is the area were Blythe's cavalry fought. All of the following data is from Reference 6. The data is in chronological order and includes place of action, type of action, date of action, and units involved. If the place of action is highlighted and underlined, you may click on it to see additional information about the various actions that occurred at this place during the course of the war. Additional information from the National Park Service, National Battlefield Protection Program (NPS-NBPP) is available on selected actions. These are marked at the end of the action - if you click on the NPS-NBPP text, you will have to use your browser's BACK button to return to this site.

Iuka (engagement Sept. 19, 1862) 1st Cavalry Regiment (Partisan Rangers), W. Adams's-Wood's Cavalry Regiment, 7th Infantry Battalion, 36th, 37th, 38th, 40th, and 43rd Infantry Regiment. NPS-NBPP information available.

Peyton's Mill (skirmish Sept. 19, 1862) 1st Cavalry Regiment (Partisan Rangers)

Corinth (battle Oct. 3-4, 1862) Pettus Flying Art. Batt., Warren Lt. Artillery Battery, 1st Cavalry Regiment, W. Adams's-Wood's Cavalry Regiment, 7th Infantry. Battalion, Caruthers's Infantry Battalion (Sharpshooters), 6th, 15th, 33rd (Hurst's-Drake's), 35th, 36th, 37th, 38th, 39th, 40th, 41st, and 43rd Infantry Regiment. NPS-NBPP information available.

Lamar (skirmish Nov. 6, 1862) 1st Cavalry Regiment

HudsonvilleHudsonville (skirmish Nov. 8, 1862) 1st Cavalry Regiment

Ripley (skirmish Nov. 20, 1862) 1st Cavalry Regiment (Partisan Rangers).

Memphis and Charleston RR, Tennessee (May 19 - July 4, 1863) Buckner Artillery Battery, Quitman Lt. Artillery Battery, 1st Cavalry Battalion (State Troops), 12th and 18th Cavalry Battalions., 1st Cavalry Regiment (Partisan Rangers), 3rd Cavalry Regiment (State Troops). NPS-NBPP information available.

Chalmer's Raid, W. Tennessee and N. Mississippi (Oct. 4-17, 1863) 14th Light Artillery Battalion (Co. C), Buckner Artillery Battery, 1st Cavalry Regiment (Partisan Rangers), 3rd Cavalry Regiment (State Troops), 5th Cavalry Regiment, 12th Cavalry Battalion, 18th Cavalry Battalion

Collierville, Tennessee (action Nov. 3, 1863) 1st Cavalry Regiment (Partisan Rangers), 3rd Cavalry Regiment (State Troops), 5th Cavalry Regiment, 18th Cavalry Battalion. NPS-NBPP information available.

Smith's (A.J.) 2nd Mississippi Invasion (Aug. 1864) 18th Cavalry Battalion,1st Cavalry Regiment (Partisan Rangers), 4th, 5th, 6th, and 8th Cavalry Regiment

Franklin Campaign, Tennessee (Nov. 1864 - Jan. 1865) 1st Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Cavalry Regiment (Partisan Rangers). NPS-NBPP information available.

Selma, Alabama (engagement and capture April 2, 1865) 1st Cavalry Regiment, 24th Cavalry Battalion, Ashcraft's-Ham's-Lowry's Cavalry Regiment (Consolidated). NPS-NBPP information available.


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US Flag  An Action Of Interest - the following raid was the basis of the movie "Horse Soldiers." We don't believe that the 2nd Cavalry Regiment (State Troops) is the same group as the 2nd Partisan Rangers Regiment, but we included this action because it took some brave and daring Yankee cavalry to travel the length of Mississippi in early 1863! It was the 6th Illinois Cavalry that conducted this raid. C. Mart Watson contacted me about this raid, and told me that his great-great grandfather, Green B. Tucker, was a member of this cavalry group. It is possible that Green B. Tucker is related to George Tucker, the grandfather of John Bowen Tucker. Mr. Watson hopes to prove or disprove this connection sometime this year. We will post more information as it becomes available.

IL Flag  Grierson's Raid (6th Illinois Cavalry) (defense against Federal expedition from La Grange, Tn. to Baton Rouge, La., April 17 - May 2, 1863) 2nd Cavalry Regiment (State Troops), 12th Cavalry Battalion, 14th Cavalry Battalion (Partisan Rangers), 16th Cavalry Battalion (State Troops), W. Adams's -Wood's Cavalry Regiment, Hughes's Cavalry Battalion (Partisan Rangers). For more information on this raid click on Grierson - Part 1 and Grierson - Part II. You will have to use your browser's BACK button to return to this site


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MS Flag  Benjamin C. Tucker in the Civil War

The research notes of Dr. Cecil Tucker (Reference 7) showed that Benjamin had served with Confederate forces in the Civil War. Benjamin was 16 when the war started, but we do not know when he joined up. Also, Dr. Tucker did not show in which unit Benjamin had served. We have searched in many of the Mississippi units listed on the Internet, but we have not found Benjamin's name among them. We are continuing our search for his war records.


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MS Flag  James W. Tucker in the Civil War

The first clue about James W. Tucker's service in the Civil War was found in Memoirs of Mississippi (Reference 8), which stated "In 1864, when but sixteen years of age, the latter (James W. Tucker) enlisted in the Confederate army, Colonel Withers' regiment, and served until the close of the war." Colonel W. T. Withers commanded the First Regiment Mississippi Artillery (1st Lt. Art. Regt.). The following brief history of that unit is from Reference 9.

"1st Artillery Regiment was organized during the late summer of 1862 with eleven companies. During the war the various companies served as both light and heavy artillery but not as one command. The regiment was assigned to the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, and Companies A, C, D, E, G, I, and L were captured at Vicksburg. Companies B, F, H, and K were captured at Port Hudson. After being exchanged, Companies A, B, C, D, F, G, I, K, and L were assigned to the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, Company E to the Trans-Mississippi Department, and Company G to the Army of Tennessee. All disbanded before the end of the war. Its commanders were Colonel William T. Withers, Lieutenant Colonel James P. Parker, and Majors Benjamin R. Holmes and Jefferson L. Wofford."

Various companies of this unit fought all over the south, as evidenced by the data obtained from Reference 6. However, James joined the army in 1864 so he could not have served in the actions dated before 1864. We decided to include all the unit's actions for those interested in Civil War data. All of the following data is from Reference 6. The data is in chronological order and includes place of action, type of action, date of action, and units involved. If the place of action is highlighted and underlined, you may click on it to see additional information about the various actions that occurred at this place during the course of the war. Additional information from the National Park Service, National Battlefield Protection Program (NPS-NBPP) is available on selected actions. These are marked at the end of the action - if you click on the NPS-NBPP text, you will have to use your browser's BACK button to return to this site.

Georgia Landing (or Bayou Lafourche), Louisiana (action near Labadieville Oct. 27, 1862) 1st Lt. Art. Regt. (Co. H). NPS-NBPP information available.

Chickasaw Bayou (skirmish Dec. 27-29, 1862) 1st Lt. Art. Regt. (Co. C, E, H, and I), 14th Lt. Art. Bn. (Co. A, B, C), 3rd, 4th, 35th, and 46th Inf. Regts., 3rd Inf. Regt. (State Troops). NPS-NBPP information available.

Steele's Bayou Expedition (defense to, March 14-27, 1863) 1st Lt. Art. Regt. (Co. C).

Rolling Fork (skirmish March 20, 1863) 1st Lt. Art. Regt. (Co. C), 22nd and 23rd Inf. Regts.

Vicksburg Passage (defense against Union Navy April 16, 1863) 1st Lt. Art. Regt. (Co. L), 14th Lt. Art. Bn., 46th Inf. Regt.

Vicksburg Siege (May - July 3, 1863) 1st Lt. Art. Regt. (Co. A, E, G, H, K), 14th Lt. Art. Bn. (Co. A and B), Pettus Flying Art. Batt., 3rd (State Troops) and 7th Inf. Bn's., 4th, 5th (State Troops), 35th, 36th, 37th, 38th, 40th, 43rd, and 46th Inf. Regts. NPS-NBPP information available.

Atlanta Campaign, Georgia (May - Sept. 1864) 1st Lt. Art. Regt. (Co. G), 14th Lt. Art. Bn. (Co. B), Brookhaven Lt. Art. Batt., Jefferson Flying Art. Batt., Smith's-Turner's Art. Batt., Stanford's Art. Batt., Warren Lt. Art. Batt., 1st Cav . Regt., 2nd Cav. Regt. (Partisan Rangers), 3rd, 9th, 11th, 12th, and 28th Cav. Regts., 1st Inf. Bn. (Sharpshooters), 3rd (Williams's) Inf. Bn., 7th Inf. Bn., 9th Inf. Bn. (Sharpshooters), 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 14th, 15th, 20th, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, 27th, 29th, 30th, 31st, 32nd, 33rd (Hurst's-Drake's), 34th, 35th, 36th, 37th, 39th, 40th, 41st, 43rd, 44th, 45th, and 46th Inf. Regts. NPS-NBPP information available.

Atlanta, Georgia (siege July - Sept. 1, 1864) 1st Lt. Art. Regt. (Co. G), 14th Lt. Art. Bn. (Co. B), Brookhaven Lt. Art. Batt., Jefferson Flying Art. Batt., Smith's-Turner's Art. Batt., Stanford's Art. Batt., Warren Lt. Art. Batt., 1st an d 2nd Cav. Regts., 2nd Cav. Regt. (Partisan Rangers), 3rd, 9th, 11th, 12th, and 28th Cav. Regts., 1st Inf. Bn. (Sharpshooters), 3rd (Williams's) Inf. Bn., 7th Inf. Bn., 9th Inf. Bn. (Sharpshooters), 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 14th, 15th , 20th, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, 27th, 29th, 30th, 31st, 32nd, 33rd (Hurst's-Drake's), 34th, 35th, 36th, 37th, 39th, 40th, 41st, 43rd, 44th, and 46th Inf. Regts. NPS-NBPP information available.

Mobile Campaign, Alabama (March 17 - April 12, 1865) 1st Lt. Art. Regt. (Co. B, C, D, G, I, K, L), Smith's-Turner's Art. Batt., 7th Inf. Bn., 4th, 35th, 36th, 39th, and 46th Inf. Regts. NPS-NBPP information available.


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LA Flag  Rev. George Tucker and his sons Rev. Jeremiah H. Tucker and Andrew F. Tucker in the Civil War

Unfortunately, we have not found a web site for Louisiana Civil War information as detailed as the Mississippi Civil War Information Web Site, so we do not know all the actions in which George, Jeremiah, and Andrew participated. However, we did locate information on these three men in Reference 10. They all served in the 27th Louisiana Infantry, George as a Major in Company I, Jeremiah as a Lieutenant in Company G, and Andrew as a Private in Company G. (Reference 10 gives Jeremiah's rank as Private, but family data shows he was discharged as a Lieutenant. Since Jeremiah was a college graduate we think the higher rank is correct.) George and Jeremiah joined the army in March 1862. George served until the end of the war, but Jeremiah was discharged in August 1863 in very poor health. We know that Jeremiah was at Vicksburg because a letter that he wrote to his wife from Vicksburg exists. (To read this letter CLICK HERE. Use the BACK button to return.)

Andrew enlisted Dec 11 1861 at Camp Moore, LA, in Company I, 19th Louisiana Infantry. He transferred to Company G, 27th LA on Sept. 24, 1862. Andrew was captured and paroled at Vicksburg and continued to serve until the end of the war. He was a resident of the Texas Confederate Home located in Austin, Texas. He died in Austin in 1932 and is buried there. From Reference 11 we find:

"A. F. TUCKER, Pvt., Co. I, enlisted 11 Dec 1861 at Camp Moore, LA, born Marshall Co. MS, age 17, blue eyes, auburn hair, fair complexion, occupation student & was 5 7 tall. Transferred to Co. G, 27th LA Vols. on 24 Sep 1862."

The National Park Service maintains a web site that has information and several photographs that pertain to the 27th Louisiana Infantry at Vicksburg. Also, Rev. George Tucker and Rev. Jeremiah Tucker were well known Baptist preachers, both before and after the war. (Rev. George Tucker's father, Rev. Jeremiah Tucker, was also a well known Baptist preacher in Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi.) For more on their lives, see Reference 12. Also, for genealogy information on these men go to Courtney Tompkins' Web Page. Use the BACK button to return to this site.

George Tucker Major George Tucker
Company I
27th Louisiana Infantry
Joined Army at age 56
  Jeremiah Tucker Lieutenant Jeremiah H. Tucker
Company G
27th Louisiana Infantry
Joined Army at age 33

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References:

1. O'Sullivan, Timothy H., "Incidents of war," 1865, Selected Civil War Photographs from the Library of Congress, 1861-1865, [http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/cwphome.html] [cwp 4a40875] (January 21, 1999).
2. Gardner, Alexander, "Antietam, Md. Confederate dead by a fence on the Hagerstown road," 1862, Selected Civil War Photographs from the Library of Congress, 1861-1865, [http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/cwphome.html] [cwp 4a39529 ] (January 21, 1999).
3. Oral history from Dorothy Holley, as given to her by Sarah Elizabeth Tucker, daughter of John Bowen Tucker
4a. "Civil War Records - DeSoto County," compiled by members of the Genealogical Society of DeSoto County
4b. "DeSoto Descendants," Vol. 18, No.3, August 2000, page 4.
5. "DeSoto County in the Civil War Days," by James W. Thompson, Local Paper -DeSoto County, Mississippi, 5/1/1975.
6. Mississippi Civil War Information Web Site.
7. "The Jeremiah Tucker Family History," Dr. Cecil B. Tucker, Nashville, TN, 1975
8. "Memoirs of Mississippi," BIOGRAPHICAL & HISTORICAL MEMOIRS OF MISSISSIPPI, VOL. II, 927.
9. "Units of the Confederate States Army," Joseph H. Crute, Jr., Published by Derwent Books; Midlothian, Virginia. (c)1987
10. Young Sanders Center - Louisiana Civil War Information Web Site.
11. US GenWeb Data - A. F. Tucker
12. "A History of the Baptist of Louisiana," Rev. W. E. Paxton, C. R. Barns Publishing Co., St. Louis, MO, 1888 (Note: The Baptist Convention in Alexandria, LA has a copy of this book.)


Page maintained by William Tucker, willietnm@earthlink.net. Created: 2/12/2005. Updated: 2/19/2005