~~ Plymouth Colony and Massachusetts ~~

--- First Generation in America ---

 

 

         John Washburn, the immigrant ancestor to Plymouth Colony, lived in the part of Plymouth that became the town of Duxbury. Later in life he was among those Duxbury townsmen who organized the inland town of Bridgewater in Plymouth Colony. He had only two sons, John and Philip Washburn, who lived in Plymouth Colony; his only daughter Mary Washburn having never joined her parents in the new world.

 

 

(28.) John1 Washburn (4th), second son and heir of (10) JohnA Washborne (3rd), (2) JohnB (Jr.), (1) JohnC; born in Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, in 1597,[1] married Margery1 Moore, daughter of RobertA and EllenA (Taylor) Moore, of Bengeworth, England, on 23 Nov. 1618 in Bengeworth.[2] She was born ca. 1586,[3] baptized on 3 Nov. 1588 in Bengeworth,[4] a granddaughter possibly of George and Elizabeth (Pepill) Taylor, of Alvechurch, Worcester.[5]

         Robert Moore married Elen Taylor on 19 Nov. 1585 in Bengeworth.[6] He was a “Glover” in Bengeworth, and died there testate in 1625, and was buried on 14 Jan. 1624/5 in Bengeworth.[7] The will of “Robert More of Bengworth in the County of Worseter[,] glover” was dated 18 Dec. 1624, and mentioned his wife Elener, son and heir Thomas More, and the 3 children of Margery Washborn, among others. (See Appendix I for a full transcription of his will.) Ellen Taylor was baptized on 14 July 1567 in Alvechurch, Worcestershire, England,[8] and evidently died sometime after 1626, presumably in Bengeworth.

         John Washburn (4th) was a Churchwarden of St. Peter’s Parish, Bengeworth, in 1625-1626.[9] He sailed to New England in about 1631 or 1632,[10] and settled in the town of “Duxborrow” in Plymouth Colony, where he was a tailor.[11] On 2 Jan. 1632/3 John Washburn sued Edward Doty in Plymouth Colony for wrongfully taking a hog from him, but the court found Washburn’s case to be faulty, and dismissed it.[12] John Washburn was on the list of those taxed in Plymouth Colony on 25 Mar. 1633. He may have returned to England to arrange passage for his wife and children in 1634, because his name was not among those taxed in Plymouth Colony that year, but he probably returned to Plymouth Colony in late 1634.[13] His wife followed in April of 1635, in the ship “Elizabeth and Ann”, with their two sons, John Washburn, 14, and Phillip Washburn, 11.[14]

         On 5 Jan. 1635/6 John Washborne purchased a “house and palisado” from Edward Bompass in Plymouth Colony, “beyond Eagle Nest Creek,”[15] presumably on the “Duxborrow” side of Plymouth. In 1637 John Washburn was living in Duxbury, where his farm was described in the laying out of a path passing between William Bassett and Francis Sprague’s land to the town of Duxbury. The description of the path gives the names of some of Washburn’s neighbors. It was described as beginning at “Wadsworth’s, through Sprague’s and Basset’s orchards, thence through John Washburn’s land to Wm. Palmer’s gate, thence through Peter Brown’s land to the westward of Henry Howland’s house, thence through a marsh to Mr. John Alden’s, thence through a valley by the corner of Philip Delanoy’s farm to Edward Bumpasse’s, and thence by Rowland Leyhorne’s house to Greens harbor.”[16] On 4 June 1638 John Washburne acknowledged that he owed £40 to the King.[17] Plymouth Colony Records include a decision on 6 Apr. 1640 where William Sherman and John Washborne were “to have such accommodations of land as may be spared in the place where they desire.”[18] Probably as a result of this, on 5 Apr. 1641 the colony allowed John Washbourne 40 acres additional land in “Duxborrow.”[19] He was surveyor of highways in Duxbury on 5 Mar. 1638/9,[20] and again on 6 June 1649,[21] and on 4 Mar. 1650/1 he was fined for failing to repair the highway in Duxbury he was overseer of.[22] On 3 May 1642 a committee was directed to set the bounds between the lands of Mr. Thomas Besbeech and John Washburn in Duxbury,[23] and Washburn was appointed on committees to “view bounds” in others’ cases on 1 June 1647 and on 10 June 1650.[24] Morris and Jane Truant, of Duxbury, sold 28 acres of planting land and 2 parcels of meadow in Duxbury between John Irish and John Alden to John Washburne on 4 Mar. 1647/8.[25]

         In August 1643 John Washborne Sen., John Washborne Jun., and Phillip Washborne were listed among those able to bear arms, aged 16 to 60 years, in “Duxborrow.”[26] John Washburn, and his son, John Washburn Jr., were among the original 54 proprietors, or purchasers, of the new town of Bridgewater in Plymouth Colony in 1645.[27] John Washburn became a freeman in Plymouth Colony on 2 June 1646.[28] On 3 June 1662 he was granted a double portion of land at “Saconnet” (Little Compton) for his having been both an “ancient freeman and a former servant,” but there is no record as to whom he was a servant of, and he apparently never moved to the Little Compton area.[29]

         John Washburn served on several juries in Plymouth Colony, beginning on 7 Sept. 1642, again on 5 Nov. 1644, on a grand jury on 4 June 1645, and juries on 7 June 1648, 5 June 1666, and 25 Oct. 1668.[30] He was also on the coroner’s jury regarding the inquest of the body of John Paybody, of Duxbury, who died about 1666.[31]

         On 26 May 1666 John Washburne deeded his homestead dwelling house and land in Duxbury to his “true and natural son” Phillip Washborne.[32]

         Margery (Moore) Washburn apparently died shortly after arriving in New England,[33] presumably in Duxbury, and John Washburn eventually moved to Bridgewater,[34] although he took an oath of fidelity in Duxbury in 1668. He was living in Bridgewater by 17 Mar. 1670, when his son, John Washburn, Jr., sold a share of land in Bridgewater to Edward Southworth,[35] and the 29 May 1670 list of freemen in Duxbury included the name “John Washburne, Senr.”[36] John Washburn died in Plymouth Colony in 1671, between 17 Mar. 1670/1 and 22 May 1671,[37] but no probate records were filed for his estate in Plymouth Colony.

         John and Margery Washborne had 4 children:

         42        i   Mary Washborne, baptized on 6 Oct. 1619 in Bengeworth, Worcestershire,[38] possibly died in England before 1635, as she was not brought to New England with her mother and brothers, or she may have been the Mary Washborne who married Richard Hyde on 5 May 1634 in St. Lawrence Parish, Evesham, Worcestershire, England.[39]

+       43       ii   John2 Washborne (5th), baptized on 26 Nov. 1620 in Bengeworth,[40] came to New England in 1635 with his mother and brother, and married 1.) Elizabeth2 Mitchell, daughter of Experience1 and Jane2 (Cooke) Mitchell, on 6 Dec. 1645 in Plymouth Colony,[41] and 2.) Elizabeth1 (____) Packard, widow of Samuel1 Packard, of Bridgewater, MA, in ca. 1685 in Bridgewater, MA.[42] (Continued.)

         44      iii   Philip Washburn, baptized on 2 June 1622 in Bengeworth, was buried on 7 June 1622 in Bengeworth.[43]

+       45      iv   Philip2 Washburn, born in ca. 1624 in Bengeworth,[44] came to New England in 1635 with his mother, and married Elizabeth2 Irish,[45] daughter of John1 and Elizabeth (Risely[?]) Irish, of Duxbury, MA, in, say 1663, in Duxbury, MA. (Continued.)

 

 

 

--- Second Generation in America ---

 

 

         The two sons of John Washburn married and remained in the Duxbury-Bridgewater part of Plymouth Colony. Son John Washburn had a large family in Bridgewater, whose children began to spread out across Massachusetts and into the Connecticut Colony. Son Philip Washburn had a small family with only one son, who settled in the town of Plymouth.

 

 

 

 

JohnB Washborne (Jr.)

 

 

JohnA Washborne (3rd)

 

 

 

 

JoneB Bushell

 

John1 Washburn (4th)

 

 

 

 

MarthaA Timbrell

 

Mary Washburn

 

 

 

John2 Washburn (5th)

 

 

 

Philip2 Washburn

 

 

 

 

 

RobertA Moore

 

 

Margery1 Moore

 

 

 

 

 

GeorgeB Taylor

 

 

EllenA Taylor

 

 

 

 

ElizabethB Pepill

 

(43.) John2 Washburn (5th), eldest son of (28) John1 Washburn (4th), (10) JohnA (3rd), (2) JohnB (Jr.), (1) JohnC; born in Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, in 1620,[46] sailed to New England with his mother and brother in 1635, and settled first in Duxbury, Plymouth Colony. He married 1.) Elizabeth2 Mitchell, daughter of Experience1 and Jane2 (Cooke) Mitchell, of Duxbury, on 6 Dec. 1645 in Plymouth Colony.[47] She was born in ca. 1628 in Plymouth Colony, a granddaughter of Francis1 Cooke, who came to New England in 1620 on the “Mayflower,” and Hester1 (Mahieu) Cooke, and possibly of ThomasA and Margaret (Williams) Mitchell, of Cambridge, England, and Amsterdam, Holland.[48] Experience Mitchell and Jane Cooke had both sailed to New England in 1623 on the “Anne.”[49]

         In 1738 Abraham Sampson was presented to the court “for striking and abusing John Washburn the younger in the meeting house on the Lord’s day.”[50]

         When the Narragansett War broke out in 1645, the town of Duxbury sent John Washburn in August 1645 as one of its representatives to help fight the Indians, along with Sgt. Samuel Nash, William Brewster, William Clark, Nathaniel Chandler, and Edward Hall, for 17 days.[51]

         John Washburn (5th) was made a freeman in Plymouth Colony on 6 June 1654,[52] and he was elected constable of Duxbury on 7 June 1659.[53] On 29 July 1661 Experience Mitchell acknowledged that he had given his son‑in‑law, John Washburn, some land between the brook and the Stony River, which John Washburn had in turn sold to Mr. William Bradford.[54]

         John Washburn (5th) and his father joined with several residents of Duxbury in the formation of the new town of Bridgewater in 1645. The names of John Washburn and John Washburn, Jr., are among the original proprietors of Bridgewater, which was incorporated into a town in 1656.[55] In Dec. 1683 the purchasers of Bridgewater met, and laid out lots on the outside of Bridgewater, which became North Bridgewater, now Brockton, East Bridgewater, West Bridgewater, and South Bridgewater. John Washburn received 2 lots in East Bridgewater, 1 lot in West Bridgewater, and 1 lot in South Bridgewater.[56]

         Elizabeth (Mitchell) Washburn died by ca. 1685, and John Washburn remarried to 2.) Elizabeth1 (____) Packard, widow of Samuel1 Packard, of Bridgewater, in ca. 1685.[57]

         John Washburn died testate on 12 Nov. 1686 in Bridgewater.[58] His will was dated 30 Oct. 1686, his inventory taken on 19 Nov. 1686, and his will probated on 8 June 1687. His will mentioned his wife, Elizabeth; brother Phillip Washburn, to be taken care of by his son John Washburn; sons John, Thomas, Joseph, Samuel, Jonathan, Benjamin, and youngest son, James Washburn, a minor; daughter Mary; daughter Elizabeth and her husband; daughter Jane; daughter Sarah, a minor; and brother Edward Mitchell.[59] (See Appendix K for a full transcription of his 1686 will.)

         On 1 Apr. 1700 the heirs of John Washburn, of Bridgewater, namely James Washburn, John Washburn, Thomas Washburn, Joseph Washburn, Samuel Washburn, Jonathan Washburn, Samuel Kinsley and wife Mary, widow Elizabeth Selee, and John Ames and wife Sarah, sold land in Bristol Co., MA, to John Rogers.[60] Elizabeth (Packard) Washburn died sometime after 1687, but presumably by 1700.

         John Washburn had children, all by Elizabeth Mitchell:[61]

+       56       i   John3 Washburn (6th), born ca. 1646, probably in Duxbury, Plymouth Colony,[62] married Rebecca Lapham, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Tilden) Lapham, of Scituate, MA,[63] on 16 Apr. 1679 in Bridgewater.[64] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

+       57       ii   Thomas3 Washburn, born in ca. 1648, probably in Duxbury, married 1.) Deliverance2 Packard, daughter of Samuel1 and Elizabeth1 Packard,[65] in ca. 1680 in Bridgewater, and 2.) Sarah (___) Leonard, widow of John2 Leonard, on 28 July 1708 in Bridgewater,[66] and 3.) Abigail (Atkins) Heyford, widow of John Heyford,[67] on 24 July 1711 in Bridgewater.[68] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

+       58      iii   Samuel3 Washburn, born in ca. 1651,[69] probably in Duxbury, married Deborah2 Packard, daughter of Samuel1 and Elizabeth1 Packard,[70] in ca. 1677 in Bridgewater. (Con­tinued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

+       59      iv   Joseph3 Washburn, born on 7 July 1653 in Duxbury,[71] married Hannah3 Latham, daughter of Robert2 and Susanna2 (Winslow) Latham,[72] in ca. 1677.[73] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

+       60      v   Jonathan3 Washburn, born in ca. 1655, probably in Duxbury, married Mary Vaughan, daughter of George and Elizabeth (Hinchman) Vaughan, of Scituate, MA,[74] in 1683.[75] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

         61      vi   Benjamin3 Washburn, born in ca. 1658, probably in Bridgewater, never married. He died in the expedition of Sir William Phipps against the French in Quebec in 1690,[76] leaving a nuncupative will. Administration of his estate was granted to his brothers Joseph and Samuel Washburn in 1690/1 in Bridgewater.[77] (See Appendix Ζ for a transcription of his will.) He was unmarried and left no children.[78]

+       62     vii   Mary3 Washburn, born in 1661 in Bridgewater,[79] married Samuel3 Kinsley (Jr.), son of Samuel2 and Hannah (Brackett) Kinsley,[80] in ca. 1689.[81] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

+       63    viii   Elizabeth3 Washburn, born in ca. 1664 in Bridgewater,[82] married 1.) James2 Howard/Haward, son of John1 and Martha2 (Hayward) Howard/Haward, of Bridge­water,[83] in ca. 1685, and 2.) Edward Selee, of West Bridgewater, in ca. 1692. (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

+       64      ix   Jane3 Washburn, born in ca. 1670 in Bridgewater,[84] married William Orcutt (Jr.), son of William and Martha (Lane) Orcutt, of Scituate, MA,[85] in ca. 1691.[86] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

+       65      x   James3 Washburn, born on 15 May 1672 in Bridgewater, MA,[87] married Mary Bowden on 20 Dec. 1693 in Bridgewater.[88] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

+       66      xi   Sarah3 Washburn, born in ca. 1675 in Bridgewater,[89] married John Ames (Jr.), son of John and Sarah2 (Willis) Ames, of Bridgewater,[90] on 12 Jan. 1696/7 in Bridgewater.[91] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

 

 

(45.) Philip2 Washburn, youngest son of (28) John1 Washburn (4th), (10) JohnA (3rd), (2) JohnB (Jr.), (1) JohnC; born in Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, ca. 1624,[92] sailed to New England with his brother and mother in 1635 aboard the “Elizabeth and Ann,” and he married Elizabeth2 Irish, daughter of John1 and Elizabeth1 (Risely[?]) Irish, of Duxbury, Plymouth Colony,[93] in, say 1663, and they probably also settled eventually in Bridgewater, MA, with his father and brother. She was born ca. 1643,[94] probably in Duxbury.

         John1 Irish was born ca. 1609 supposedly in Clisdon Parish, Somersetshire,[95] England, supposedly a son of JonathanA and ElizabethA (Kirby[?]) Irish,[96] and had come to Plymouth Colony in ca. 1630 with Timothy Hatherly, from Somersetshire. John Irish was a proprietor of Bridgewater, and also owned land in Newport and Little Compton, which was then part of Plymouth Colony. John Irish died on 5 Mar. 1677 in Duxbury.[97] Elizabeth Risely was born ca. 1613, a daughter possibly of Richard and Mary (Arnold) Risely,[98] and died on 28 Aug. 1687 in Duxbury.[99] Jonathan Irish’s wife, Elizabeth, was possibly a daughter of Gilbert Kirby, of Gillcross, England,[100] and Jonathan Irish was possibly a son of Charles and Eleanor (Mallory) Irishe,[101] but further research is needed to determine the accuracy of this.

         Phillip Washburn never became a freeman like his father and brother, and by 8 May 1685 he was found incapable of taking care of himself, at which time his nephew, Joseph Washburn, agreed to take care of him. He was still living on 19 Aug. 1700, but probably died soon after, presumably in Bridgewater. No probate records were found for him in Plymouth County.

         Phillip Washburn and Elizabeth Irish had children:[102]

+       67       i   Elizabeth3 Washburn, born say 1664, probably in Duxbury or Bridgewater, married Joseph3 Amory, of Little Compton, Plymouth Colony, son of Rebecca2 Amory, in ca. 1682.[103] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

+       68       ii   Deacon John3 Washburn, born ca. 1672 in Duxbury or Bridgewater,[104] married 1.) Lydia4 Billington, daughter of Isaac3 and Hannah (Glass) Billington,[105] in ca. 1698, and 2.) Wybra/Weborah3 Bumpus, daughter of Joseph2 and Wiborah (Glass) Bumpus, of Plymouth,[106] after 1716, and 3.) Mehitabel (Barrow) Wright, daughter of Robert and Ruth (Bonham) Barrow,[107] and widow of Adam3 Wright, of Plympton, MA, on 13 Dec. 1744 in Kingston, MA.[108] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

+       69      iii   Margery3 Washburn, born in ca. 1678 in Duxbury or Bridgewater, married Josiah3 Leon­ard, son of John2 and Sarah Leonard,[109] on 1 Nov. 1699 in Bridgewater.[110] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

+       70      iv   Mary3 Washburn, born say 1681 in Duxbury or Bridgewater, married Daniel3 Pratt, son of Benajah2 and Persis2 (Dunham) Pratt,[111] as his second wife, on 1 Oct. 1706 in Plymouth.[112] (Continued in Plymouth Generation 3.)

 

 

{Back to Site Index} {Continued in Plymouth Colony Generation #3}

 

 

© 2002 John A. Maltby, Redwood City, California



        [1] St. Peter’s Parish Registers, Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, from FHL [Family History Library] Microfilm #0383530; baptized on 2 July 1597 in Bengeworth.

        [2] St. Peter’s Parish Registers, Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, from FHL Microfilm #0383530.

        [3] Calculated from her age of 49 in 1635 when she sailed to New England aboard the “Elizabeth and Ann.”

        [4] St. Peter’s Parish Registers, Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, from FHL Microfilm #0383530.

        [5] Per the birth record of Ellen Taylor in the International Genealogical Index, 1994 edition, not verified through parish records yet.

        [6] St. Peter’s Parish Registers, Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, from FHL Microfilm #0383530.

        [7] Bishop’s Transcripts from St. Peter’s Parish, Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, from FHL Microfilm #0246641; Index of Wills and Administrations at the Probate Registry at Worcester, England, 1601-1652, Robert More, of Bengeworth, glover, folio #130 for 1626.

        [8] International Genealogical Index, 1994 edition, not verified through parish records yet.

        [9] St. Peter’s Parish Registers, Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, from FHL Microfilm #0383530. There are two signatures, differing slightly, of John Washborne, as church warden of St. Peter’s, under the year 1625. Per Davenport, Rev. James, The Washbourne Family of Little Washbourne and Wichenford in the County of Worcester, Methuen & Co., London, England, 1907, [hereinafter Davenport, Washbourne Family], p. 51, the office of Church Warden ran from Lady Day, 1625 to Lady Day, 1626, which was March 25th.

        [10] Anderson, Robert Charles, The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, [hereinafter Anderson, The Great Migration Begins], Vol. 3, p. 1937, says 1632.

        [11] Anderson, The Great Migration Begins, Vol. 3, p. 1937, citing Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 85 for is occupation.

        [12] Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 6, from Stratton, Eugene Aubrey, Plymouth Colony, Its History & People, 1620-1691, Ancestry Publishing, Salt Lake City, UT, 1986, [hereinafter Stratton, Plymouth Colony], pp. 284, 386.

        [13] Anderson, The Great Migration Begins, Vol. 3, p. 1939.

        [14] Barnard, E.A.B., Some Notes on the Evesham Branch of the Washbourne Family, Evesham, England, 1914, [hereinafter Barnard, Notes], p. 55: From London [Public Record Office]: “xiii Aprilis 1635.” “In the Elizabeth and Ann, Mr. Roger Coop. [Cooper, Master] bound for New England p. Cert: from the Maior of Evesham in com Worcr and from the Minister of ye pish. of their Conformitie,   

Margerie Washborne

49

 

Jo: Washborne

14

} 2 sonns”

Phillipp Washborne

11

            Also found in Hotten’s List of Emigrants, 1874 edition, p. 57, as noted by Barnard, Notes, p. 33; Davenport, Washbourne Family, p. 50; and Stratton, Plymouth Colony, p. 368.

        [15] Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 33; Winsor, Justin, A History of the Town of Duxbury, Massachusetts, with Genealogical Registers, Boston, 1849, reprint, Clearfield Company, Baltimore, MD, 1995, [hereinafter Winsor, History of Duxbury], p. 333.

        [16] Winsor, History of Duxbury, p. 17.

        [17] Anderson, The Great Migration Begins, Vol. 3, p. 1937, citing Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 85.

        [18] Anderson, The Great Migration Begins, Vol. 3, p. 1937, citing Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 145.

        [19] Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 2, p. 12.

        [20] Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 1, p. 117.

        [21] Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 2, p. 139.

        [22] Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 2, p. 165.

        [23] Stratton, Plymouth Colony, p. 244; Anderson, The Great Migration Begins, Vol. 3, p. 1939, from Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 2, pp. 39, 52.

        [24] Anderson, The Great Migration Begins, Vol. 3, p. 1937, from Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 2, pp. 117, 122, 160.

        [25] Pulsifer, David, Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England, Vol. XII: Deeds, & C., 1620-1651 and Book of Indian Records for Their Lands, Boston, 1861, reprint, Heritage Books, MD, 1999, pp. 153-154.

        [26] Stratton, Plymouth Colony, p. 442; Winsor, History of Duxbury, p. 93.

        [27] Mitchell, Nahum, History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater, in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, Boston, 1840, reprint, Heritage Books, Bowie, MD, 1983, [hereinafter Mitchell, History of Bridgewater], pp. 10-11. The other 52 original proprietors were William Bradford, William Merrick, John Bradford, Abraham Pierce, John Rogers, George Partridge, John Starr, Mr. William Collier, Christopher Wadsworth, Edward Hall, Nicholas Robbins, Thomas Hayward, Mr. Ralph Partridge, Nathaniel Willis, John Willis, Thomas Bonney, Mr. Miles Standish, Love Brewster, John Paybody, William Paybody, Francis Sprague, William Bennett, John Ames, Thomas Gannett, William Brett, Edmund Hunt, William Clarke, William Ford, Mr. Constant Southworth, John Cary, Edmund Weston, Samuel Tompkins, Edmund Chandler, Moses Simmons, John Irish, Philip Delano, Arthur Harris, Mr. John Alden, John Fobes, Samuel Nash, Abraham Sampson, George Soule, Experience Mitchell, Henry Howland, Henry Sampson, John Brown, John Haward, Francis West, William Tubbs, James Lendall, Samuel Eaton, and Solomon Leonard. Two more shares were added shortly after, to Rev. James Keith, their first minister, and Deacon Samuel Edson.

        [28] Stratton, Plymouth Colony, p. 369.

        [29] Stratton, Plymouth Colony, p. 369, from Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 4, p. 18.

        [30] Anderson, The Great Migration Begins, Vol. 3, p. 1937, from Plymouth Colony Records, 2:84; 2:126; 4:125; 7:32; 7:38; and 7:150.

        [31] Anderson, The Great Migration Begins, Vol. 3, p. 1937, from Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 5, p. 29; Winsor, History of Duxbury, p 285.

        [32] The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 16, pp. 249-250; Plymouth Colony Deeds, Vol. 3, p. 61.

        [33] No deeds were found in Plymouth Colony by John Washburn, Sr., in which Margery Washburn signed with him.

        [34] Mitchell, History of Bridgewater, p. 26, list of original purchasers who became permanent settlers, included John Washburn and John Washburn, Jr.

        [35] Plymouth Colony Land Records, Vol. 3, p. 209, as transcribed by George Ernest Bowman in “Washburn Notes,” The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 16 [1914], p. 250.

        [36] Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 8, p. 198.

        [37] Bowman, George Ernest, “Washburn Notes,” The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 16 [1914], p. 250. On that date John Washburne “Senir” and wife Elizabeth Washburne acknowledged the deed of his father John Washburne to Edward Southworth dated 17 Mar. 1670, so his father must have recently died. Robert Charles Anderson, in The Great Migration Begins, Vol. 3, p. 1938, believes that he died soon after 22 May 1671, because the deed, when it was first drawn up, called his son “Jr.,” but it was altered to “Sr.” soon after. In either case, his death occurred most likely in the spring of 1671, and quite possibly in the month of May. It is not know if he was at that time living still in Duxbury or in the new town of Bridgewater.

        [38] St. Peter’s Parish Registers, Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, from FHL Microfilm #0383530. Davenport has the date as 3 Oct. 1619, but it looks to me like a “6.”

        [39] Parish Registers of St. Lawrence, Evesham, Worcestershire, England, from the Richard Savage Collection at the Shakespeare Library, from FHL Microfilm #0504474.

        [40] St. Peter’s Parish Registers, Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, from FHL Microfilm #0383530.

        [41] Wakefield, Robert S., Plymouth Colony Marriages to 1650, p. 48, taken from Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 2, p. 94; Torrey, Clarence Almon, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1987, [hereinafter Torrey, New England Marriages], p. 783.

        [42] Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 783, married between 7 Nov. 1684 and 30 Oct. 1686. Some sources list her maiden name as “Stream,” but I have not seen any proof of this.

        [43] St. Peter’s Parish Registers, Bengeworth, Worcestershire, England, from FHL Microfilm #0383530.

        [44] Based on his age of 11 in 1635 when he came to New England with his mother. The parish registers and Bishop’s transcripts for Bengeworth are both missing for the year 1624.

        [45] The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 15 [1913], p. 247; Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 783.

        [46] Baptized on 26 Nov. 1620 in St. Peter’s Parish, Bengeworth.

        [47] Wakefield, Robert S., Plymouth Colony Marriages to 1650, p. 48, taken from Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 2, p. 94; Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 783; Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants, The Mayflower Descendant, Boston, Vol. 13, p. 86; Roser, Susan E., Mayflower Marriages From the Files of George Ernest Bowman At the Massachusetts Society of Mayflower Descendants, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1990, [hereinafter Roser, Mayflower Marriages], p. 122.

        [48] Underhill, Lora A.W., “The Mitchells of Plymouth,” Descendants of Edward Small of New England and the Allied Families with Tracings of English Ancestry, 1934, p. 510, which has Margaret’s surname translated as “Uochin” or “”Digehin” from the Dutch marriage record in Amsterdam of 9 May 1606 for Thomas Mitchell. In English, her name is throught to have acually been “Williams.”

        [49] Wood, Ralph V., Jr., Francis Cooke of the Mayflower, The First Five Generations, published as “Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume 12,” Picton Press, Camden, ME, 1996, [hereinafter MF5G: Cooke], p. 30. Jane Cooke came to New England as a young woman with her mother, while Experience Mitchell came to New England as a single man.

        [50] Winsor, History of Duxbury, p. 173.

        [51] Winsor, History of Duxbury, p. 94; Stratton, Plymouth Colony, p. 369, from Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 2, p. 90.

        [52] Stratton, Plymouth Colony, p. 369, from Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 3, p. 48.

        [53] Stratton, Plymouth Colony, p. 369, from Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 3, p. 163; Winsor, Duxbury, p. 81.

        [54] Eastham Land Grants 1659‑1710, p.113.

        [55] Mitchell, History of Bridgewater, pp. 10-11, 13. (See footnote 140 for a full list of the original proprietors.)

        [56] Mitchell, History of Bridgewater, pp. 31-32.

        [57] Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 783; Roser, Mayflower Marriages, p. 122; the marriage occurred between 7 Nov. 1684 and 30 Oct. 1686. Some sources list her as a possible daughter of John and Elizabeth (Whitman) Stream, of Wymondham, Suffolk Co., England, but others disagree with this identification. I have done no research on the English origins of Samuel Packard, and cannot make an assessment at this time.

        [58] The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 15, p. 251: The date of his death is found in his inventory, dated 19 Nov. 1686.

        [59] Plymouth Co. Probate Docket #22015; Vol. 1, p. 84.

        [60] Bris­tol County Deeds, Vol. 4, p. 83.

        [61] Mitchell, History of Bridgewater, p. 322, gives their children as John, Thomas, Joseph, Samuel, Jonathan, Benjamin, Mary 1661, Elizabeth, Jane, James 1672, and Sarah.

        [62] Calculated from his age at death.

        [63] Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 451; Barclay, Mrs. John E., “Rebecca Lapham, Wife of Samuel White or John Washburn?”, The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 115, pp. 83-85.

        [64] Vital Records of Bridgewater, Massachusetts, To the Year 1850, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, MA, 1916, [hereinafter Bridgewater VRs], Vol. 2, p. 392; Barclay, Mrs. John E., “Rebecca Lapham, Wife of Samuel White or John Washburn?”, The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 115, pp. 83-85.

        [65] Mitchell, History of Bridgewater, p. 253.

        [66] Bridgewater VRs, Vol. 2, p. 392.

        [67] MF5G: Cooke, p. 102.

        [68] Bridgewater VRs, Vol. 2, p. 392.

        [69] Calculated from his age at death.

        [70] Mitchell, History of Bridgewater, p. 253.

        [71] Sherman, Robert Moody, and Vincent, Verle Delano, Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume 2: James Chilton of the Mayflower, General Society of Mayflower Descendants, Plymouth, MA, 1978, p. 32; MF5G: Cooke, p. 73; Wakefield, Robert S., Sherman, Robert Moody, and Vincent, Verle Delano, Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume Fifteen: Family of James Chilton, General Society of Mayflower Descendants, Plymouth, MA, 1997, [hereinafter MF5G: Chilton], p. 32, which gives his birth as Duxbury ca. 1652. I don’t know where this date comes from originally. The sources listed in the footnotes do not lead to this birth date.

        [72] MF5G: Chilton, pp. 11-12, 32.

        [73] Estimated from the birth of their eldest child, probably in early 1678.

        [74] Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 766; MF5G: Cooke, p. 106.

        [75] Bridgewater VRs, Vol. 2, p. 388.

        [76] Stratton, Plymouth Colony, p. 134.

        [77] Plymouth Co. Probate Docket #21924; Vol. 1, p. 94.

        [78] Bowman, George Ernest, “Benjamin Washburns of Bridgewater,” Pilgrim Notes and Queries, Vol. 5, No. 1, [Jan. 1917], p. 2.

        [79] Bowman, George Ernest, Pilgrim Notes & Queries, Vol. 3, No. 7, [Nov. 1915], p. 102, letter from Thomas Mitchell, of Amsterdam, to his uncle Experience Mitchell, in Duxbury, dated 24 July 1662, which mentions the recent birth of a daughter to his cousin Elizabeth and her six sons, referring to the news relayed in a letter he had received from his uncle dated 23 Apr. 1661, so Mary Washburn was probably born shortly before 23 Apr. 1661.

        [80] MF5G: Cooke, p. 108, which spells her husband’s name “Kingsley;” Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 441.

        [81] Mitchell, History of Bridgewater, pp. 322; Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 441: married before 28 July 1690; MF5G: Cooke, p. 108.

        [82] Calculated from the date of her marriage, in 1685.

        [83] Mitchell, History of Bridgewater, pp. 191-192.

        [84] Calculated from estimated year of her marriage.

        [85] Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 545: marriage of William Orcutt and Mary Lane on 24 Jan. 1663/4 in Hingham, MA; MF5G: Cooke, p. 110.

        [86] Calculated from the date of the birth of their eldest child, in about 1692.

        [87] Bridgewater VRs, Vol. 1, p. 325.

        [88] Bridgewater VRs, Vol. 2, p. 383.

        [89] Calculated from her age at death.

        [90] Mitchell, History of Bridgewater, p. 99; MF5G: Cooke, p. 112.

        [91] Bridgewater VRs, Vol. 2, p. 391.

        [92] Aged 11 in April 1635.

        [93] Wilbour, Benjamin Franklin, Little Compton Families, Little Compton, RI, 1967, [hereinafter Wilbour, Little Compton Families], p. 370, taken apparently from the Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 6, p. 785; FHL Ancestral File for John Irish and Elizabeth Risely, submitted by Larry S. Christiansen, of Tullahoma, TN, Fae S. Cobbley, of American Fork, UT, Robert A. Valentine, of Overland Park, KS, Scott A. Tracy, of Payette, ID, and many others. I have not been able to confirm her maiden name from reliable published sources or through original record research.

        [94] Her birth year from the FHL Ancestral File, cited above, but it was not recorded in the vital records of Duxbury.

        [95] Anderson, The Great Migration Begins, Vol. 1, from an indenture dated 20 Apr. 1629 whereby John Irish, “of the parish of Clisdon in the county of Summersett laborer,” agreed to serve Timothy Hatherly of the parish of St. Olave in Southwark “at the town of Plimouth called New England” for a term of 5 years, but Anderson points out “there is no Clisdon parish in Somersetshire.” Another source lists the parish as “Chidon, Somerset.”

        [96] Wilbour, Little Compton Families, p. 370, taken apparently from the Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 6, p. 785; FHL Ancestral File, submitted by Robert A. Valentine, of Overland Park, KS, Scott A. Tracy, of Payette, ID, Helen B. Willden, of Sandy, UT, and many others. I have not confirmed this with reliable published sources or original records.

        [97] Wilbour, Little Compton Families, p. 370, but his death was not recorded in the vital records of Duxbury.

        [98] Per the FHL Ancestral File, submitted by Michael D. Richards, of Cedar City, UT, J. Mark Hadley, of Brigham City, UT, Allan H. Whytock, of Federal Way, WA, and several others, but I have not confirmed this with reliable published sources or original records.

        [99] Wilbour, Little Compton Families, p. 370, but her death was not recorded in the vital records of Duxbury.

        [100] Per the FHL Ancestral File, submitted by Scott A. Tracy, of Payette, ID, and Wendell H. Eyring, of Mesa, AZ, but I have not confirmed this with reliable published sources or original records.

        [101] Per the FHL Ancestral File, submitted by Larry S. Christiansen, of Tullahoma, TN, Scott A. Tracy, of Payette, ID, Mary Bakeman, of Roseville, MN, and several others, but I have not confirmed this with reliable published sources or original records.

        [102] Mitchell, History of Bridgewater, p. 322, says “we cannot find that he left either wife or children.”

        [103] Calculated from the age of their eldest child, Patience Amory, at her death; the Little Compton Vital Records show a date of 1694, which is evidently incorrect.

        [104] Calculated from his age at death.

        [105] Hodge, Harriet W., Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume Five, John Billington of the Mayflower, General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1991, [hereinafter MF5G: Billington], pp. 60, 43-44.

        [106] MF5G: Billington, p. 61.

        [107] Davis, William T., Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, reprint, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1994, originally published as Part II of Ancient Landmarks of Plymouth, Boston, 1899, [hereinafter Davis, Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families], p. 15, under Robert Barrow.

        [108] Vital Records of Kingston, Massachusetts, To the Year 1850, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 1911, [hereinafter Kingston VRs], p. 297.

        [109] MF5G: Chilton, pp. 21, 58.

        [110] Bridgewater VRs, Vol. 2, p. 383.

        [111] Davis, Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families, p. 209; Torrey, New England Marriages, p. 598.

        [112] Van Antwerp, Lee D., Vital Records of Plymouth, Massachusetts, to the year 1850, Picton Press, Camden, ME, 1993, [hereinafter Plymouth VRs], p. 88; Roser, Mayflower Marriages, p. 113.



I APPENDIX I: The Will of Robert More, of Bengeworth (1624): *

    In the name of god Amen. I Robert More of Bengworth; in the County of Worseter glover, Beinge seck in Body but of perfect memory The lord be praysed; doo make and ordayn This my last wel and testament: folowinge The xviiith Day of Desember ano dom. 1624.

    First I bequeth my soul to god that gave it and had Redemed it wth the precous Blod of his der son my Blessed savyore and in whos only merecs I trust to be saved: And my body to be buryed in the church yard of Bengeworth: And as for my worldly goods that god hath blessed me weth: I thus desere of them: I give and Bequeth unto my welbeloved son Thomas More on hous or Tenement with all and singular: the apertenances setuat and Being  .… in Evesham: And now in the … and … of an John Morton: To have and to hould the whol to Thomas More my son said to his heairs for ever: preuyd never the les: And my wel is That my son Thomas More shal pay or caus to be payed to Margaret Milner my dauter The ful sum of Twenty shillings yerly during the natural lif of the said margaret my dauter: Also i give to my said son Thomas mor anothr house or tenement setuat and being in the coustred in Evesham Between the hous of an Edward … on the north sid and the hous of an welyem Coten on the south sid: To have and to hould the said house unto my son Thomas More and his heires forever: But my wel is that my wel beloved wife shal in joy it the tim she is wedoud: Also I give to my son Thomas al my mars fols an gelding and All his  form? to an Bras upou the Begoste that was my … But upon this condishon: That my son Thomas shall pay or cause to be payd to the 3 children of Margery Washborn the som of x P or soru … … to be equaly devided at the … of i D …. to pay to Margery the som of p vi yerly. And the Rest of my goods & chatels and cattel: …. of …. now or ….: I give to my beloved wife Elnor whom I make my sole executor of this my last wel and testament And I apoynt and ordain my welbeloved son in law Edward prs[?] And my wel beloved son Thomas More to be my overseers of this my last wil to se it performed acordinge to the tru intent and knowing ther in: in witnes therof …. ther unto set my hand …the day and year afor Retten   ) Robart More :  )

John B…..  Edward heail  Thomas Adames

 

An inventory of the goods chattels of and be?ols of Robert More late of Bengworth glover Desesed taken And Apraised The third of January Ano Dmi 1624 And in the Raine of The Kinge Majste James By the grace of god Kinge of England … the xxiith

By john Balam …. Edward godard Thomas More & John Mander[?]

 

* Transcribed with much difficulty by John A. Maltby from FHL Microfilm #0098029 "Wills of the Consistory Court of Worcester, Diocese of Worcester, England, 1626," film #1 for that year, folio #130.

 

 

K APPENDIX K: The Will of John Washburn, of Bridgewater (1686): *

These are to Publish and Declare to all to whome it may concerne that I John Washbourne Senr of Bridgwater in the Colony of New Plimouth being through the mercy of God of sound judgment and memory Do ordaine and make my last will and Testament in maner Following Vizt. Into the hands of God I commend my spirit Believingly resigning up my soul into the Everlasting arms of Gods mercy my Body to be Decently inburied at the Discresion of my Executor: And for my outward Estate I do will that after all my just Debts and funerall Expenses be fully paid my Lands and other movables be Disposed of as followeth:

Impris I Give to my wife Elizabeth Washbourne one Bed one Boulster one pillow two pair of sheets one Blanket one Coverlet two chests Six bushels of Indian Corne one bushell of Barley Farther with Respect to money which was my wives part whereof I have already laid out for her we are agreed that I should Returne to her two pounds and ten shillings which I have already Done.

I Give to my Son John four score acres of upland in the place where he hath already Built and what shall be found wanting of the fourscore acres in the said place shall be made up to him on the Easterly side of my Land next the South Brooke more I Give to him a lot of meadow in Cousters Kitchen lying between the lots of Samuel and james: More two Lots of Meadow Lying in the Great Meadow above the Great Island More I Give to him a whole purchase Right in the undivided lands. Further my Will is that my son John take Care of my Brother Phillip to provide for him and on that Consideration, I farther Give to my Son John half a purchase Right in my undivided lands and half a fifty acre Lot not yet laid out Further I Give to him the Improvement of a Lot of Meadow in the Great meadow Lying next to John Ames During my Brothers Life and after my Brothers Decease the one half of the lot Shall be to my son James and my Son John shall Enjoy the other half. To my son Thomas I have already Given twenty acres of upland which he hath Exchanged for Land where he hath built More I have Given him a Lot of meadow in Cousters Kitchen lying on the outside Northerly. I have also Given him half a purchase Right in the undivided lands of all which Lands I have formerly Given him Deed:

To my Son Joseph I have Given twenty acres of Land lying at Satucket pond and a lot of meadow lying at Black Brooke I have otherwise Done for him according to my abillity And my will is that he therewith Rest Contented.

To my Son Samuel I Give thirty five acres of Land in the place where he hath already Built and a Lot at Quatitequat joyning to his Great lot there. More I Give half a purchase Right in the undivided Lands. Also a lot of meadow Lying up poore meadow River and joyning to his own lot there more a lot of meadow in Cousters Kitchen lying on the outside Southerly. Further I Give to him thirty acres of Land joyning to his Land where he hath built And also a Steere Calf.

To my son Jonathan I Give fifty acres of Land Lying on the outside of my land next the South Brooke and if he should Come to settle upon it within the space of two years after the Date of this my Will he shall Enjoy it as his own otherwise my sons John Samuel Benjamin and James Shall Enjoy the Land being Equally Divided betweene them Each of them paying to my son Jonathan fifty shillings in common pay more I Give to my son Jonathan a Lot of meadow lying in the Great Meadow joyning to a lot of Goodman Turners.

Also half a purchase Right in the undivided lands.

To my son Benjamin I Give fifty acres of Land which formerly was my fathers lot Also a lot of meadow lying up Satucket River and joyning to a lot of Samuel Wadsworths and half a purchase Right in the undivided lands. Also two young steeres a yong horse a cow a Bed an an iron pot.

To my Younger son James when he shall Come to age I Give the land which Lyeth between my son John and my son Benjamin butting on the River and Runing in Length till it meet with the Butt of my son Samuels Land with my dwelling house and all out housing thereunto belonging Also a Lot of meadow in Cousters Kitchen joyning to a lot of Benjamin Willis. and half a purchase Right in the undivided Lands. a fifth acre lot lying near Bear Swamp I Give to my two sons John and Samuel to be Equally Divided between them. A lot of meadow lying in the mouth of Black Brooke I Give to my three sons Samuel Jonathan and Benjamin to be Equally Divided between them: to my Daughter Mary I Give ten acres of Land to be laid out: and one Cow. To my Daughter Elizabeth I Give ye mare which they have in keeping and ten acres of Land already layd out to my Son in Law her husband. To my two Daughters Mary and Elizabeth I Give twenty acres of land Lyding Down the Town River on the northerly side and joyning to the Lands of William Brett to be Equally Divided. To my Daughter Jane I Give twenty acres of Land Lying down Satucket River on the Easterly Side and joyning to the lands of Samuel Allen: further I Give to her one Cow one heiffer a bed and an iron pot: To my Daughter Sarah I Give twenty acres of Land joyning to my Son Samuels Land near his house.

Further all my Right and Interest in the lands Called the Majors purchase or in any other Lands without the four mile my Will is that it shall be Equally Divided between my sons John Thomas Samuel Jonathan Benjamin and james. My two old oxen I Leave in the hands of my two sons John and Samuel to be sold when fit for sale and four pounds of the money to be Disposed of for my Son Benjamin towards his building. I Leave on the Land which I intend to my son James: one horse two oxen one Bull two Cows with all the Furniture for husbandry to be Improved for the benifit of my two yonger Children James and Sarah and my Will is that when these Children come to age the principle be Divided between them. By principle I Intend the horse oxen and other Cattell with the tooles and Furniture afore mentioned. For my Trustees and overseers I Do nominate my kind friend Mr John Thomson of Middleborough and my Brother Edward Mitchel I Do nominate and ordaine my two sons John and Samuel Executors of this my last Will and Testament Revoking all other Wills and Testaments whatsoever. Witness my hand and seal October 30th 1686:

Signed and Delivered in                                                                      John Washbourne

The presence of                                                                                   his:  Joh   mark     (Seal)

Thomas Hayward

Joseph Alden

 

This Instrument being Exhibited unto the Inferior Court of Common Pleas held at Plimouth the Eighth Day of june 1687 By John Washbourne therein named Executor Thomas Hayward and Joseph Alden the Witnesses above named personally appearing made oath before the said Court that the Testator John Washbourne Deceased in their presence Did signe seal and Declare this Instrument to be his Last Will and Testament and that he then was of a Disposing mind and understanding to the best of their judgments.

                                                                                                Attest Nathaniel Thomas Clerk

Memorandum.

That John Ames senr of Bridgwater appeared before the Inferior Court of Common pleas held at Plimouth Sept 19th 1687 and made oath that he was present with the other witnesses within named head the within named John Washbourne Deceased Declare this Instrument to which his hand and seal is put to be his last Will & Testament and that he then was of a Disposing mind and understanding to the best of his judgment.

                                                                                                Nathaniel Thomas Clerk

An Inventory of the Goods and Chattels of John Washburne of the Town of Bridgwater deceased ye 12th day of November 1686 ___ which is as followeth: …

(The total value of the inventory was £142, 8 s.)

A true and fair prisall of the Estate of John Washburne according to our best judgment Taken by us ye 19th Day of november 1686.

As Witness our hands

John Field

John Leonard

 

* Transcribed by John A. Maltby from Plymouth County Probate Vol. 1, p. 84-86, from FHL microfilm #0550708, and compared with the transcription made by George Ernest Bowman and published in The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 15, pp. 248-251.

 

 

Ζ APPENDIX Ζ: The Will of Benjamin Washburn, of Bridgewater (1690): *

    “On the 28th Day of july 1690: Benjamin Washbourn of the Town of Bridgewater….having Some Days since listed himself in order to Goe against the ffrench Enemy and Considering the Difficulty of the voyage that therein it might please God to take him away Either by the sword or other ways and not having yet disposed of his Estate according to his will… The said Washbourne therefore desired that we whose names are here under written would take notice that his will is as followeth: I the said Benjamin Washbourne Do Give unto my Brothers Jonathan Washbourne and james Washbourne both of Bridgewater….my lot of Land in said Bridgewater being butted in the South Brooke to be Equally Devided between my said Brothers And my half of that lott lying on the Easterly side of the Burch plain in said Bridgwater; I Give unto my Brother Samuel Washbourne of Sd Bridgwater….also my lot of meadow lying on Setucket River joyning to a Lott of meadow now belonging to my Brother Joseph Washbourne of Sd Bridgwater. And also my half purchase of Undivided land being both within the Limits of sd Bridgwater the which Sd lot of meadow and Sd half purchase of undivided land I give unto my Said Brother Joseph Washbourne….And all the Remainder of my lands I Give unto my Said Brother James Washbourne….I do also give unto my Sister Jane Washbourne of Sd Bridwater a Brindled Cow which at this time wereth the Bell also two pound in money in my sd Brother Samuel his hands. I Give unto my Sd Sister and Brother jane and James to be Equally Divided between them two. I do also Give unto my Sister Sarah Washbourne of Sd Bridgwater one sheep and one lamp, and whatsoever Else shall appear to belong unto my Estate I Give unto my Sd Brother James Washbourne”

    “Edward michell Thomas michel and John ffield made oath before the County Court at Plimouth march 17th 1690/91 that on the Day of the Date first above written they were present and heard Benjamin Washbourne aforenamed verbally Declare the before written to be his will and that the Same was then written from his own mouth.”

    The inventory was taken 12 December 1690 by David Perkins and John Leonard. The real estate was: “50 acres of Land, £15, “more Land and meadow” £8.

    “Samuel Washbourne made oath before the County Court at Plimouth March 17th 1690/91 that the above written is a true Inventory of the estate of his Brother Benjamin Washbourne late of Bridgwater deceased”

    “Joseph Washbourne and Samuel Washbourne[,] John ffield Senr and Edward michel all of Bridgwater” gave a bond of £60 sterling, on 17 March 1690/1, “the Said Joseph Washbourne and Sam’l Washbourn as principles each of them in the Sum of twenty pounds, and the said John ffield and Edward Michell as Sureties Each of them in the Sum of ten pounds….the sd Joseph Washbourne and Samuel Washbourne have obtained Letters of Administration to Administer upon the Estate of their Brother Benjamin Washbourne deceased”

                The bond bears the autograph signatures of “Joseph Washburn” “Samuel Washburn” “John ffield” and “Edward michell” also the autographs of the three witnesses, “John Haward” “Edward ffobes” and “Saml Sprague Clerk.”

    On 15 September 1691 Joseph Washburn and Samuel Washburn, the administrators, made oath that they had “fully Administred upon the estate.”

 

* Transcription from George Ernest Bowman, The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. 16, p. 47-49, from Plymouth County Probate Records, Vol. 1, p. 94-95.