Biesemeyer Fence removeable cover
                                               

Since many of you have asked questions regarding how to build an auxillary fence for your Biesemeyer, how to mount it on a Craftsman and how the magnetic feather boards look and work I took home a digital camera and made some photos to share:

Fence cover

This is a side view of my fence with the magnetic feather boards attached. Note that there is about one inch of wood then the top part of the fence is covered with a 1/8" thick steel plate. This lets me hold the wood down with the feather boards as well as holding it against the fence with one. There is a piece of stock in position. The feather board on its side has a sandpaper cover roller that is biased to push the piece into the fence as you push it through the blade.

You can also see my Delta portable planer with the extension tables I made in the background. The c-clamp is for the temporary fence for my router which is mounted in my home made outfeed extension for the table saw.



This photo shows the end construction of the fence. The extra height to the left works for cutting raised panels which shows in a later photo here. All the pieces are 3/4" thick material.

Clamp photo

This shows the arrangement for the toggle clamps that are used to lock the fence in place. I had to get a special shaft adapter made to reach through the board, but other wise these are off the shelf clamps. The fence can also be used to the left of the blade so the aux fence can be flipped around and works on either side the same way. The clamps hold it firmly in place, but let me get it off when needed in a hurry.

Raised panel

Here is a raised panel ready for cutting the bevel. The board clamped to the back lets me slide across the throat plate without fear of the trailing edge dropping in the blade slot since a zero clearance insert can't be used when the blade is tipped. It also gives a good place to grip the pieces being cut since the blade guard is not used and the the blade is up a long ways. I always cut the cross grain first and use a rip blade for all cuts. I also use feather boards to hold the panel against the fence at the bottom in front of and behind the blade.

lifted cover

This photo shows the fence being lifted off the Biesemeyer fence. Won't tell you how it is staying in mid air. We'll see if anyone can figure it out.

side view

Here is a detail photo of the way the pocket screws were used to hold the pieces together. The block gives a bit of extra support to keep the sides from splaying out when the clamps are engaged. It also served as a practice area for my hot stamp once before it was added to the fence. The top also makes a convenient tray to keep track of pencils and tape measures.


 




Created: 31 December 2002
By: Leon Schierer mail to: us71na@earthlink.net