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NEWS OF 150 YEARS AGO

November-December 1861

From The Missouri Democrat, Wednesday, November 6, 1861.

LATEST NEWS.

BY TELEGRAPH.

Last Night’s Dispatches.

HIGHLY IMPORTANT NEWS.

Gen. Fremont Superseded.

LATEST NEWS.

HE TAKES LEAVE OF THE ARMY.

HIS FAREWELL ADDRESS.

TO BE IN ST. LOUIS TO-NIGHT.

The Rebel Army Largely Reinforced.

PROSPECTS OF A FIGHT.

LATEST NEWS.

Behavior of the Troops on the News of their General’s Removal.

&c., &c. &c.

[Special Dispatch to the Missouri Democrat.]

MOVEMENTS OF THE REBELS.

SPRINGFIELD, MO., Saturday, A. M., Nov. 2.-Price’s Army passed through Neosho on Wednesday, and is probably at Cassville to-day. We have no information as yet as to his movements after reaching there. McCulloch’s force, or at least a portion of it, is at Crane Creek, 29 miles southwest from this point. The exact force is not as yet ascertained. It is moving slowly towards us. It is not known whether McCulloch is with this band.

THE INDIANS ON THE WAR-PATH.

A portion of the Indians connected with our army donned their war paint last night and left on a scouting expedition.

LANE, STURGIS AND M’KINSTRY.

Gens. Lane’s and Sturgis’s command arrived here last night after a forced march of thirty-five miles. Gen. McKinstry encamped at Bolivar last night and should be here this evening or in the morning.

ILLNESS OF DR. BARNES.

Dr. Barnes, the senior medical officer of the Western Department, sent on to supersede Dr. Tillkampf, as Medical Director, has for several days been lying seriously ill here with a bilious complaint. He is better to-day, however, and will probably be able to assume the duties of his position in a day or two. Dr. T., in the meantime, is continued in his former office.

THE BODY GUARD.

Private Newman, of Company B, Body Guard, died yesterday evening. The remainder of the wounded are all doing well. Lieut. Connelly, of White’s battalion continues to improve, and strange to say, will probably recover. He received no less than four wounds, one directly through the lungs, and was besides brutally beaten over the head by the ruffians who robbed him of his boots and money as he was lying apparently at the point of death on the battle field. Mr. Smith, a citizen of Springfield, who was accidentally shot, is still in a precarious situation.

FALL OF SNOW.

A few flakes of snow fell here yesterday; to-day, however, it is as warm as September.

LATER.

GENERAL FREMONT RECEIVES THE ORDER OF HIS REMOVAL.

SPRINGFIELD, Saturday, November 2-P. M.-General Fremont received this forenoon an official notification of his removal from the command of the Western Department. The Body Guard is now under marching orders, and will probably leave with the General for St. Louis some time between now and nightfall.

LANE, STURGIS AND M’KINSTRY.

With a portion of his Body Guard, Fremont left Springfield Sunday morning, and may be expected in St. Louis by to-morrow. He doubtless will at once give his attention to the accusations against him.

The General, to all appearances, has taken the news with his usual calmness and self possession. The fact of the reception of the news is not generally known as yet, even among the staff, the larger portion of whom would probably leave with him, were they aware of it.

BAD POLICY OF HIS REMOVAL.

Whatever may be the opinion in regard to Gen. Fremont’s military ability, none can but acknowledge the fact that his removal at this time, when within a few days’ march of the enemy, will be a severe blow to the Union cause of the West, but it behooves all good and loyal citizens to bow to the decision of the powers that be, and by giving their hearty support to his successor, repair this injury to the extent of their powers.

THE SUCCESSOR OF FREMONT.

Gen. Hunter, who is to succeed Gen. Fremont, is well known as a veteran officer of great ability and executive capacity. Gen. H. has not as yet arrived, but will doubtless be here ere many hours.

SIGEL IN TEMPORARY COMMAND.

Gen. Sigel will probably assume the command until his arrival, being the senior Brigadier-General attached to this army.            G. W. B.

STILL LATER NEWS.

The Rebels Reinforced and Expected to Make an Advance-Important Accessions to the Rebel Army.

SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI, SATURDAY, 3 P. M.-Generals Albert Sidney Johnston, Hardee and Jeff. Thompson, with, in all, 18,000 men, with 12 pieces of artillery, left the borders of Wayne and Stoddard counties on the 18th ult., and arrived in the vicinity of Forsyth two or three days since. They have, ere this, united with Price as Cassville.

THE COMBINED REBEL FORCE.

The combined rebel armies, I am now informed by reliable authority, will number at least 60,000 men.

There are some small bodies coming up from Arkansas; these men are all well armed, and one artillery company, composed of Germans from Memphis, is very effective, they have one 32-pound gun.

I should not be surprised to hear at any moment of a general advance of the rebel forces on Springfield.

This is an excellent time, certainly, for the removal of the General commanding.

It is now thought that General Fremont will not leave till morning. Ther news of his removal is not yet generally known.           G. W. B.

THE VERY LATEST NEWS.

Departure of Gen. Fremont from Springfield-The Feeling in the Army-Resignation of Gen. Asboth-Gen. Hunter not heard from-The Farewell Address.

SPRINGFIELD, MO., Sunday, A. M.-General Fremont and staff left for St. Louis this morning. He is accompanied by his body guard. He will arrive in St. Louis by Wednesday.

On last evening a printed document was issued, and gave the first official announcement to the troops of the fact of his removal from the command of this Department.

THE FEELING IN THE ARMY.

It created the most profound sensation, and upon hearing it, several companies threw down their arms, but subsequently returned to duty. Some fears are entertained of trouble among the troops, but I think there is no danger of open mutiny, though it cannot be concealed that the feeling is intense.

RESIGNATION OF ASBOTH.

General Asboth has tendered his resignation, and leaves for St. Louis with Gen. Fremont and staff.

ABOUT THE COMMAND.

The command is for the present in the hands of Gen. McKinstry, who will retain it until Gen. Pope arrives, who is expected in a few hours. Nothing has as yet been heard from Gen. Hunter, but it is supposed he will be here to-night.

THE VALEDICTORY OF FREMONT.

The following is the valedictory of Gen. Fremont, referred to above:

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT. SPRINGFIELD, MO., Nov. 2, 1861.

Soldiers of the Mississippi Army:

Agreeably to orders this day received, I take leave of you. Although our army has been of sudden growth, we have grown up together, and I have become familiar with the brave and generous spirit which you bring to the defense of your country, and which makes me anticipate for you a brilliant career. Continue as you have begun, and give to my successor the same cordial and enthusiastic support with which you have encouraged me. Emulate the splendid example which you have already before you, and let me remain, as I am, proud of the noble army which I had thus far labored to bring together. Soldiers, I regret to leave you. Most sincerely I thank you for the regard and confidence you have invariably shown to me. I deeply regret that I shall not have the honor to lead you to the victory which you are just about to win, but I shall claim to share with you the joy of every triumph, and trust always to be fraternally remembered by my companions in arms.

[Signed:] J. C. FREMONT,
Major General United States Army.

Further Details of Fremont’s Removal.

SPRINGFIELD, MO., Nov. 3-Yesterday a small exodus of the enemy came within 12 miles of us, and news was received of the approach of their advance 2,800 strong. Preparations were making to go and attack them, when Gen. Fremont received the unconditional order from Washington, relieving him at once from his command. Simultaneously came the newspapers announcing the fact. The intelligence spread like wildfire through the camps, and created indescribable excitement and indigestion.

Great numbers of the officers signified their intention to resign at once, and many companies laid down their arms, declaring they would fight under no one but Fremont. The General spend much of the afternoon expostulating with the officers, and urging them by their patriotism and their personal regard for him not to abandon their posts. He also issued a farewell order to the troops.

Feeling ran intensely high during the whole of last evening, and there was mutiny almost everywhere. The various bands serenaded the General, and whenever he appeared he was greeted with cheers. Though after notifying Gen. Hunter, at his order directed, he had no longer command over the troops, he spent several hours in making a personal examination of the ground about the city to be prepared for a battle, and in accordance with a written request from all the Brigadier Generals here, he remained through the night to lead the army in case of an attack.

All the troops slept on their arms. Many of the officers remained up all night, and an attack was hourly expected, but nothing more occurred than the firing on our pickets on two different roads.

The enemy are now encamped on the old Wilson Creek battleground. Gen. Fremont is prepared to leave for St. Louis, and will go as soon as Gen. Pope arrives, who has been sent for, and will take command until Gen. Hunter arrives. Universal gloom prevails throughout the camps.

A battle will undoubtedly occur before long. Our troops will meet the enemy firmly, but they are disheartened and have lost their enthusiasm.

The Body Guard, who could not be induced to remain, and who will now disband, as the terms of their enlistment permit, accompany General Fremont, and also his entire staff, including Gen. Asboth, Commander of the First Division. Gen. Fremont will permit a demonstration from the troops on his departure.

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