7 Fun Facts about the MTA San Bernardino Line

“It‘s the longest of the Metropolitan Rail System Lines”

mta logo At 57 miles from its start at Union Station in Los Angeles to the Santa Fe Depot in San Bernardino, the San Bernardino Line is more than twenty miles longer than the next longest, the Santa Ana Line. It also has the two stations with the greatest distance between them, Entiwanda and Fontana stations are fully 5.66 miles apart. This also explains why. . .

“It‘s the only line where you can flag a train down”

Unlike every other line in the system, once within San Bernardino County, you are allowed to flag down the train to pick you up or drop you off at spots in-between regular stations. In practice, this only happens at major street crossings, but you could in theory get picked up in an orchard. You better be quick, though, because...

“Its trains are the fastest”

Thanks to those long distances between stops east of Pomona, trains frequently reach speeds of 70 mph! Even so. . .

“It has the longest average trips”

Both in time and in distance, riders of the San Bernardino line are more likely to ride twenty percent longer than passengers on any other line. Most trips exceed twenty-five miles, along the way passing through...

“The Highest station in the system”

Which is the Cucumonga Station, at 1,490 feet. Like most of the stations on the line, Cucumonga is an old Pacific Electric stop, and that‘s because...

“Fully 100% of the line follows the old P.E.”

While much of the Metropolitan Rail System is built upon the one once run by the Pacific Electric, almost all of them follow, at some point, a different route from the P.E. lines they duplicate...except for the San Bernardino Line, which fully follows the former Pacific Electric San Bernardino line from one end of the line to the other. Which is interesting, because...

sbct logo“It‘s actually two lines”

In spite of the fact that it is referred to as the “MTA San Bernardino Line” and that the cars from one end to the other bear the MTA logo, the line is actually shared between Los Angeles‘s MTA and San Bernardino‘s SBCTrans. The line was built as a joint venture by the two county agencies, which share operating and maintenance costs. San Bernardino, however, contracts out to Los Angeles to provide the equipment and operators that service their section of the line, which is why you‘ll never see a SBCTrans logo on a train even though half the route belongs to them. MTA has a similar arrangement with Orange County on the Santa Ana line.