German American Community Service
 Information affecting the German American Community
 

 

Over Three Hundred Years of German Immigration to America

In 1683, the Concord sailed from Rotterdam via London, carrying 13 families making their way to the New World from Krefeld, (North-Rhine Westphalia) in search of religious freedom. The immigrants sailed from Rotterdam on July 6, headed out across the Atlantic Ocean from London on July 24, 1683, and landed in Philadelphia on October 6, 1683. They began the community of Germantown, which is part of Philadelphia.

The Concord has been the symbol of German Immigration as the Mayflower is associated with the Pilgrims.

The arrival on October 6th established the foundation for Presidential and Congretional Declaration of German American Day.


JOINT STAMP ISSUES
FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY AND UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
APRIL 29, 1983

The United States Postal Service and the Postal Administration of the Federal Republic of Germany are commemorating the tricentennial of German immigration to the United States by the joint issuance of postage stamps featuring the Concord.

In 1683, the Concord sailed from London, carrying 13 families making their way to the New World from Krefeld, which is now in North-Rhine Westphalia, in search of religious freedom. The immigrants sailed on July 24, 1683, and landed in Philadelphia on October 6, 1683. They purchased land in Pennsylvania to build the community of Germantown, which today is part of Philadelphia.

The issuance of these stamps salutes the courage, stamina and motivation of those first immigrants and all who followed in their footsteps. Both the U. S. and German stamps were designed by Richard Schlecht of Arlington, Virginia, who is an American of German descent. Since a picture of the Concord was not available, his design is based upon written descriptions of the ship.

  Home to Tricentennial Foundation Web Page
More about the Concord & Her Passengers
More about German American Day