DOC NEESON / DOC NEESON'S ANGELS

Doc Neeson was the lead singer for the Australian rock band The Angels.

RADIO ROCK VOLUME ONE: TRAMPLE THE WEAK, HURDLE THE DEAD (2000)

Radio Rock Volume One Cover

Tracks

  1. Flesheaters Episode 1 - Doc Neeson
  2. Underdog - Testeagles
  3. Flesheaters Episode 2 - Doc Neeson
  4. (Two Faced) Check Your Head Up - Superheist
  5. Slave - Toe-To-Toe
  6. Flesheaters Episode 3 - Doc Neeson
  7. Shock - Fear Factory
  8. Surfacing (Rough Mix) - Slipknot
  9. Flesheaters Episode 4 - Doc Neeson
  10. Notion - Coal Chamber
  11. Naughty - Skulker
  12. Flesheaters Episode 5 - Doc Neeson
  13. Fragment - Henry's Anger
  14. Surreality - Alchemist
  15. Flesheaters Episode 6 - Doc Neeson
  16. Desire To Fire - Machine Head
  17. Battery - Elephant Gun
  18. Flesheaters Episode 7 - Doc Neeson
  19. Quilombo - Soulfly
  20. Vinegar Stroke - Sunk Loto
  21. Flesheaters Episode 8 - Doc Neeson
  22. Reconnect - Sevendust
  23. Holy Man - One Minute Silence
  24. Flesheaters Episode 9 - Doc Neeson
  25. Inbred Hate - Psikore
  26. Flesheaters Episode 10 - Doc Neeson

Credits

Music tracks selected and compiled by Simon Caulfield
The Flesheaters was written and produced by Gerry Caulfield and Russell Grigg
  with all guitars by Peter Koppes
Narrated by Doc Neeson
Mastered by Michael Macken @ Studio 301
Design: Pearshop.inc

Releases


RADIO ROCK VOLUME TWO: NO HOPE FOR HUMANITY (2000)

Tracks

  1. Flesheaters Episode 11 (1:30) - Doc Neeson
  2. Get Out Of My Head (3:29) - Cypress Hill
  3. Flesheaters Episode 12 (1:01) - Doc Neeson
  4. Asmatic (3:30) - Spineshank
  5. Ry Ry's Song (3:30) - Glassjaw
  6. Flesheaters Episode 13 (0:48) - Doc Neeson
  7. Headspace (3:19) - Nitocris
  8. Make You Feel (Ceramic Splinter Mix) (4:40) - Sunk Loto
  9. Flesheaters Episode 14 (1:27) - Doc Neeson
  10. Pepper (1:44) - Millencolin
  11. Zero (3:03) - The Workhorse Movement
  12. Flesheaters Episode 15 (1:29) - Doc Neeson
  13. Talk Of The Sun (3:36) - Insurge
  14. Leader Of Men (3:28) - Nickelback
  15. Flesheaters Episode 16 (1:41) - Doc Neeson
  16. Action Radius (3:50) - Junkie XL
  17. Questions? (4:10) - The Step Kings
  18. Flesheaters Episode 17 (1:12) - Doc Neeson
  19. Please Continue (4:30) - Seven
  20. Gamer (3:06) - Pre_Shrunk
  21. Flesheaters Episode 18 (1:26) - Doc Neeson
  22. Bring On The Gimp (4:38) - Cheezcake
  23. Flesheaters Episode 19 (1:27) - Doc Neeson
  24. Dan Dan (3:27) - Dropweight
  25. Do It Again (3:43) - Boiler Room
  26. Flesheaters Episode 20 (2:46) - Doc Neeson

Credits

Music tracks selected and compiled by Simon Caulfield
The Flesheaters was written and produced by Gerry Caulfield and Russell Grigg
  with all guitars by Peter Koppes
Narrated by Doc Neeson
Mastered by Michael Macken @ Studio 301
Design: Pearshop.inc

Releases


DOC NEESON'S ANGELS - ACOUSTIC SESSIONS (2007)

Doc Neeson's Angels - Acoustic Sessions Cover

Tracks

  Media

1.Be With You (4:15) *
2.Out Of The Blue (3:50) *
3.Love Takes Care (3:43) +
4.No Secrets (4:59) *
5.I Ain't The One (2:19) *
6.Face The Day (5:48) * /
7.Eat City (3:06) +
8.Shadow Boxer (2:55) +
9.Stand Up (3:29)*
10.Take A Long Line (3:49) +
11.Big Star (4:29) *
12.Marseilles (6:35) +
13.Am I Ever Gonna See Your Face Again (3:53) +
   

Credits

The Players:
Doc Neeson - vocals, shake rattle n' roll, Buddhist bell, acoustic guitar (love takes care)
Jim Hilbun - basses, guitars, keyboards, saxophones, harmonica and melodica, whirly tube and vocals
Dave Leslie - acoustic, baritone and three fingered guitars, vocals
Tim Powles - drums n' percussion / most things shaken or hit, right hand piano (no secrets), vocals
David Lowy - acoustic guitar (outta the blue)
Garth Porter - organ (love takes care) and Wurlitzer (eat city)
Sophie Glasson - cello
Dr Jay - violin (four strings)
Indi Star - violin (five strings)
The Eagle St Singers - love takes care

Produced by Tim Powles aka TimEbandit
Recorded by Ted Howard at Rancom St Studios
Additional arrangements and production by Jim Hilbun and Ted Howard
Additional recording by TimEbandit at Spacejunk III
* Mixing at Rancom St by Ted Howard
+ Mixing at Spacejunk III by David Skeet and TimEbandit
Mastered by William (the master) Bowden
Management: David Edwards & Aaron Harvie for Spitfire Music
CD Cover Art: Louise Cook - Louiville Graphics
'Face to Face' artwork used with kind permission of Albert Productions
Photography: Zorica Purlija

Engineered by Ted Howard
Composed by Doc Neeson and Jim Hilbun
Arranged by Jim Hilbun and Ted Howard
Liner Notes by Doc Neeson

Releases

Notes

It's unclear whether there are any differences between the two CD versions other than the catalog number being changed.

From an interview with Doc Neeson around the time of this release:

"The mood of this record is a good expression of what I've been through in some ways. It shows the side of me that I usually keep hidden behind the flat-out rock 'n' roll energy. So it's been a great album to record, to listen back to and say, yeah, that's me as well.

Doc Neeson has lately found time to reflect. The Angels, the band he fronted for 25 years with a menacing volatility with few peers in rock 'n' roll, were torn apart by his shattering road accident of '99. Doctors told him he'd never perform again. They were wrong. But not even Doc expected this.

"The Angels derived a lot of their power from very tight riffing and very tight rhythm patterns," he acknowledges. "So the first challenge was, 'How do I get that power, a different kind of power, in an acoustic mode?'"

He glimpsed an answer in the Liberation Blue back catalogue. Struck by the imaginative feels and warm muscularity of the church's El Momento Descuidado CD, Doc called on that album's drummer/producer, Tim Powles.

"Tim's production method is very organic in that he wouldn't allow people to overdevelop an idea, to get what they were playing too organised," he says. "Quite a few times, when I thought I was running through an idea, he was actually taping it with the view of 'This is the take'!"

"Some of it is a case of internalising the songs, in a way," he says. "It was very interesting from a performance point of view. I'm almost letting the listener be a fly on the wall to what I'm feeling and that creates intimacy.

There's gallows wit, too, in the degenerate glam-rock sleaze of "Take A Long Line" and the Bastille Day fog of "Marseilles"—and a perfectly realised air of lament to the song that started it all, "Am I Ever Gonna See Your Face Again."

"Rather than hitting people over the head with a sledgehammer, this is more of a CSI approach," Doc chuckles. "It actually opens up the songs to a lot of interpretation. As a songwriter, I'm really pleased it was possible to do that."