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 To be posted: an unpublished study of origins of Fort No. 4, Charlestown, N.H.

"Samuel Farnsworth, His Horn:

Being the Annals, Genealogy, and Posterity of the three Farnsworth Brothers:
Samuel, David, and Stephen,

Who in 1740, Established, Unaided, the Site of No. 4, which Later Became Fort No. 4
and, finally, Charlestown, New Hampshire."

by Edris Myrle Hoisington Ells, typescript, ca. 1960, 110 pp.

Here is image of the inscription on Stephen Farnsworth's power horn, on which he recorded his capture and his brother Samuel's death at the hands of the French and Indians in 1746. Below the photograph are two transcriptions of the carving, with explanation. To read the History of Charlestown about the captivity of Stephen that is recorded on the horn, click here.
 

 

Click here for larger view.

 

Hyperlinked interpretation of text on powderhorn:

THIS Was STephen FARNSWorth OXIS

Horn KILLD BY Ye INDENS

WHEN he was TAKEN at No 4

SAMLL FARNWORTH  HIS HORN

JULY Ye  5 1745 W P WAS KILLED

10 day I F Was KILLED    OCTOBER Ye 11 N H
WAS TAKEN CAPTIVE AND D R KILLED

APRIL Ye 19 1746 CAPt I S  I P  S F WERE
TAKEN CAPTIVE att No 4

Ye 23  I B  E C  WAS
KILLED AND N B WAS TAKEN  Ye 26 I H was
KILLD MAY Ye 2
S P WAS KILLED Ye 5 T B
R M
WERE TAKEN CAPTIVE AND
MANY OTHERS ARE WONDED and

MAY Ye 10 M C WAS KILLED

TIMOTHY  |  SAMLL FARNSWORTH
Was KILLD at No 4 MAY 24 1746

 

 

 NOTES

Wm. Phipps killed at Great Meadow (now Putney, Vermont) while hoeing corn. [ Return to text. ]

Deacon Josiah Fisher, Upper Ashuelot, killed while driving cows to pasture. [Return to text.]

Nehemiah How killed at Great Meadow. [Return to text.]

David Rugg killed as he came down-river in a canoe. [Return to text.]

Capt. John Spofford, Isaac Parker, and Stephen Farnsworth were captured when the mills were burned and Stephen's oxen killed. [Return to text.]

At Upper Ashuelot, John Bullard killed and Nathan Blake taken. [Return to text.]

"E C" hasn't been interpreted satisfactorily yet, but it may have been the wife of Danl. Mckeeny, who was stabbed in the back as she went toward the house from the barn with a pail of fresh milk. [Return to text.]

Joshua Holton of Northfield, returning from Boston with money to pay Northfield families for billeting Maj. Hartwell and his men the preceding winter, was waylaid near Lunenburg and killed. [Return to text.]

Seth Putnam, Jr. at No. 4 when guarding women going out to milk cows. [Return to text.]

Dea. Timothy Brown and Robert Moffatt taken at lower Ashuelot. [Return to text.]

Mathew Clark was killed on the road in Colrain. [Return to text.]

[EHE gives as sources for above interpretation Henry S. Wardner and George Baxter Upham.]

She notes that the question "who "Timothy" was, has caused a good bit of controversy. Because of its location on the horn (immediately preceding the death record for Samuel) some historians have suggested that it was his first name, but that is not the explanation. Moreover, a separating line was distinctly carved after the word to prevent confusion.
    Seth and Ruth Putnam did not come to Fort No. 4 until 1750, but their son Ebenezer was there by 1746, and another son, Seth, Jr. was the first of the settlers killed by the Indians. Seth and Ruth had a son Timothy, who very well may have been at the Fort with his brothers. [Return to text.]

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