The Stewpot

Bibliography of Books on Medieval and Renaissance Cooking

Last updated 1 February 2005.

For links to primary sources available via the web, visit our Virtual Library.

You can also see a listing of in-print books available from Amazon.com.


Our Ratings:

- Not Recommended
- Recommended With Reservations
- Recommended
- Highly Recommended
- Recommended For Experienced Redactors

A Proper New Book of Cookery.  UMI Microfilms.

1575 London Edition.  Microfilmed copy of an actual Elizabethan cookbook; excellent source for period recipes, no redactions.
Reviewed by:  Allegra
Who has a copy:
Ancient Cookery:  From a M.S. in the library of the Royal Society, Arundel Collection.

This one is also in Cariadoc's cookbook collection.  Original recipes, no redactions.
Reviewed by:  Arwen.
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
The Assize of Bread (#2256).  UMI Microfilms.

Microfilmed copy of a fascinating little Tudor book "printed at the request of Mychaell Englysshe and John Rudstone aldermen of the cyte of London." Not a cookbook, but a book containing regulations and charts concerning fluctuations in the price of wheat. As the price of wheat fluctuates, it gives charts determining what a "farthynge wastell," a "farthynge symnell," a "farthyne whytelofe," a "halfpeny whytelofe," a "halfpeny whetenlofe," a "peny wheetelofe," and a "halfpeny housoldelofe" must weigh.  It's interesting if you've ever had one of those recipes that calls for "a wastel loaf," and wondered exactly how much bread that might be!
Reviewed by:  Allegra.
Who has a copy:
The Good Hous-wiues Treasurie.  UMI Microfilms.

1588 London Edition.  Microfilmed copy of an actual Elizabethan cookbook; excellent source for period recipes, no redactions.
Reviewed by:  Allegra
Who has a copy:
The Good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchen (#3298).  UMI Microfilms.

1594 Edition. Microfilmed copy of an actual Elizabethan cookbook; excellent source for period recipes, no redactions.
Reviewed by:  Allegra.
Who has a copy:
Acton, Bryan, and Peter Duncan.  Making Mead: A Complete Guide To The Making Of Sweet And Dry Mead, Melomel, Metheglin, Hippocras, Pyment And Cyser.  G. W. Kent, Inc., 1984.

Not really a compendium of thoroughly documented period beverage recipes, but has some historical information, and a good selection of recipes.
Reviewed by:  Elaina?
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Ahmed, Anne (ed.).  A Proper Newe Booke of Cokerye: Margaret Parker's Cookbook.  Cambridge: Corpos Christi College, 2002.
Read an in-depth review at Serve It Forth.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina, Tatiana.
Ainsworth-Davis, J. R..  Cooking Through the Centuries.  London: J. M. Dent & Sons, 1931.

NOT RECOMMENDED.  While this history of food and eating would have been a great source if the SCA had been around in the 1930's, much of the scholarship in this book is now out of date.  The author uses mostly secondary sources, and the artwork consists of (rather poor) drawings of period artwork.  The book contains  only a very few recipes and no redactions.  There are many, many better and more available sources out there.
Reviewed by:  Arwen.
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Anderson, John L. (ed.).  A 15th Century Cookry Boke.  Charles Scribner Sons, 1962.

Long out of print, this looks like a children's book but it isn't at all.  The contents, without introduction or comment, are the original recipes from the "Two Fifteenth Century Cookbooks". There are nice color illustrations - apropriate for a children's book - but no designation of the source or information about 15th century cooking.  There is a moderately good glossary.  This is a good source book of original recipes, but it does not document them.  No redactions.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Apicius, and Joseph Dommers Vehling (trans.).  Cookery and Dining in Imperial Rome.  Dover Books, 1977.

This contains all the original text translated from the Latin but is not the best translation available. No redactions included.
Reviewed by:  Arwen
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina, Tatiana.
Arano, Luisa Cogliati (Ibn Butan, trans.?).  Medieval Health Handbook: Tacuinum Sanitatis.  George Braziller, 1976.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Aresty, Esther B..  The Delectable Past.  Simon and Schuster, 1964.

NOT RECOMMENDED. Don't waste your money on this book!  Very few original period recipes, redactions are not especially faithful.  A survey of historic cookbooks and their recipes based upon one woman's personal collection. Its one redeeming virtue is that it contains a few reproductions of actual pages from some of the sources.
Reviewed by:  Allegra, Arwen.
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Austin, Thomas (ed.).  Two 15th Century Cookery Books.  Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1964.

This is the Early English Text Society book. It inlcudes all of the original recipes in the original Middle English. No redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Baxter.  Scottish Kitchen Map.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Eric.
Bayard, Tania.  A Medieval Home Companion: Housekeeping in the 14th Century.  Harper Collins, 1991.

An abridged translation of Le Menagier de Paris. Brief and pleasant but there are better and more complete translations.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Eirene, Elaina.
Bayard, Tania.  Sweet Herbs & Sundry Flowers: Medieval Gardens and the Gardens of the Cloisters.  New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1997.

Mostly a description of the gardens at the Cloisters Museum in New York City, there is some information on medieval herbs and how they were used.
Reviewed by:  Arwen.
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Beebe, Ruth Anne.  Sallets, Humbles & Shrewsbury Cakes.  David R Godine, 1976.

Excellent book. Currently back in print, after having been unavailable for a long time. Good commentary on Elizabethan cooking and dining. Original recipes and modern redactions included.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Berriedale-Johnson, Michelle.  British Museum Cookbook.  British Museum Publications, 1996 & 2001.

Contains recipes for many historical eras and locations, many of which are admitted to be conjectural.  However, the ones pertaining to Medieval and Renaissance Britain seem to be based on known sources.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eric.
Berriedale-Johnson, Michelle.  Olde Englishe Recipes.  London: Judy Piatkus Publishers, 1981.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Eric.
Black, Maggie.  Food and Cooking in Medieval Britain.  English Heritage Press, 1985.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eric.
Black, Maggie.  Medieval Cookbook.  Thames & Hudson, 1992.

This is a (small) coffee-table/Christmas gift type book but has a good variety of secondary information and recipes with original recipes included.
Reviewed by:  Elaina?
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Black, Maggie.  Medieval Cookery:  Recipes and History.  Swindon, England; English Heritage Press, 2003.  ISBN: 1-85074-867-5.

Appears as a chapter in A Taste Of History: 10,000 Years of Food In Britain, but this edition has better illustrations, including photographs and excerpts from period documents.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Black, Maggie (ed.).  A Taste of History: 10,000 Years of Food in Britain.  London: British Museum Press, 1993.
Contains: Prehistoric Britain and Roman Britain by Jane Renfrew, Medieval Britain and Victorian Britain by Maggie Black.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Brears, Peter.  All The King's Cooks.  Souvenir Press, 1999.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Brand new in 2000, this is a scholarly but very readable discussion of the physical kitchens and kitchen records from Henry Tudor's palace and Hampton Court.  Good photos of re-enactors doing cooking in the kitchens.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Brears, Peter.  Food and Cooking in 16th Century Britain: History and Recipes.  London: Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for England, 1985.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Eric.
Brears, Peter.  Tudor Cookery:  Recipes and History.  Swindon, England; English Heritage Press, 2003.  ISBN:  1-85074-868-3.
Appears as a chapter in A Taste of History: 10,000 Years of Food In Britain, but this edition has better illustrations, including photographs and excerpts from period documents.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Buttes, Henry.  Dyets Dry Dinner (#4207).  UMI Microfilms.

1599 London Printing.  Microfilmed copy of an Elizabethan book. Excellent work dealing with many aspects of fruits, vegetables, meats, fish, fowl, herbs, etc.  Buttes gives a lot of health information for each food listed-- what ill effects the food causes, the "humoral" classification and how to "correct" it, and more.  This work is also an excellent source of information on simple preparations for vegetables. Highly recommended for more experienced cooks, or those with an interest in humoral theory.
Reviewed by:  Allegra.
Who has a copy:
Buxton, Moira.  Medieval Cooking Today.  Buckinghamshire: The Kylin Press, 1983.

This book contains recipes from a variety of fourteenth and fifteenth century sources.  Includes reasonable modern redactions.
Reviewed by:  Arwen.
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Caton, Mary Anne.  Fooles & Fricassees: Food In Shakespeare's England.  Folger Shakespeare Library, 1999.

This is the catalog from the exhibit of the same name at the Folger Shakespeare Library in DC during the fall of 1999.  It contains at least one Elizabethan text not re-published since the 1600s.  A good source book on Elizabethan and Stuart cookery with many original recipes.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Clair, Colin.  Kitchen & Table:  A bedside history of eating in the Western world.  Abelard-Schuman, 1964.

Not a source of recipes -- an older historical work.  Nice to have, but there are more recent works which serve just as well, if not better.
Reviewed by:  Allegra.
Who has a copy:
Coe, Sophie D. and Michael D. Coe.  The True History of Chocolate.  London; Thames & Hudson; 1996.  ISBN:  0-500-28229-3.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Cosman, Madeline Pelner.  Fabulous Feasts.  New York: George Braziller, 1976.

NOT RECOMMENDED.  This book is responsible for originating and propagating some of the worst myths about Renaissance food.  It was written to discuss, not normal food, eating, and cooking, but the exceptions - the fabulous, the legendary, the unusual.  It has a superb collection of color and black and white illustrations, but the information presented is not documented.  Ms. Cosman admitted, in speeches she made in the 1970s, that parts of the information she simply "made up".  The recipes do not quote original sources and uniformly substitute non-period ingredients and methods.   Check out an in-depth book review at Serve It Forth.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Branwyn, Elaina, Melissa.
Craze, Richard.  The Spice Companion.  People's Medical Society, 1997.

Useful if you would like a little more in-depth information on the spices we use in period cookery, including where each variety comes from, other names they are known by, and much more; includes information on the "exotics" such as cubebs, grains of paradise, etc.
Reviewed by:  Allegra.
Who has a copy:
Crossley-Holland, Nicole.  Living and Dining in Medieval Paris.  Cardiff; University of Wales Press; 1996.

While the title sounds promising, and the subtitle -- The Household of a 14th Century Knight -- even more so, this book is NOT RECOMMENDED.  It is not a cookery book, but rather the result of the author's obsession with 'Le Menagier'; thanks to poor research and poor conclusions, there is little useful information to be found here.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Crowden, James.  Cider, The Forgotten Miracle.  Somerset, England; Cyder Press 2, 1999.  ISBN:  0-9537013-0-0.
Reviewed by:  .
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Cuenca, Vincent F. (trans.).  The "Libro de Cozina" of Master Ruperto de Nola.  Privately Published, 2001.
Translation of the 1529 Edition.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
David, Elizabeth.  Italian Food.  Smithmark, 1996.

The recipes are modern and "traditional", but that's not why you buy this book.  This book contains perhaps the best collection of period Italian food-related art available for the money.  Kitchen and market scenes, still lifes, and more.  Well worth it to the serious student of period cookery.
Reviewed by:  Allegra.
Who has a copy:
Dawson, Thomas.  The Good Housewife's JEWEL.  Southover Press, 1996.
Introduction by Maggie Black.  Originally published 1596-7.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Dawson, Thomas.  The Good Huswifes Jewell.  UMI Microfilms.

1596 London edition. Microfilmed copy of an actual Elizabethan cookbook; excellent source for period recipes, no redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:
Dawson, Thomas.  The Good Huswife's Jewell Parts 1 and 2.  Falconwood Press, 1988.

Original recipes, no redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Tatiana.
Dawson, Thomas.  The Second Part of the Good Huswiues Jewell.  UMI Microfilms.

1597 London Edition.  Microfilmed copy of an actual Elizabethan cookbook; excellent source for period recipes, no redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:
de la Falaise, Maxime (author), and Arabella Boxer (ed.).  Seven Centuries of English Cooking.  New York: Grove Press, 1992.

Also listed under: McKendry, Maxime, The Seven Centuries Cookbook -- this book is published alternately under both titles. It does give original recipes from a wide range of sources, but some of the redactions are laughable-- there are definitely better sources out there! However,  this is one of the early sources available to SCA cooks and shows up in many libraries, and occasionally on bookstore bargain counters.  If you find a copy cheap, buy it for the original recipes and ignore the redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
de la Varenne.  The French Cook: France's de la Varenne.  Falconwood Press, 1991.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Eirene.
Dembinska, Maria (author), Magdalena Thomas (trans.), revised and adapted by  William Woys Weaver.  Food and Drink in Medieval Poland: Rediscovering a Cuisine of the Past.  University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999.

NOT RECOMMENDED.  No original recipes; a study of medieval cuisine in Poland based upon archaeology, material culture, and ethnography; discusses eating habits of classes from peasant to King.  Fascinating but very poorly documented.  The person who had all of the manuscripts that this was based on died before the book was complete and the current author has no access to, or copies of, these possibly mythical documents.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Digby, Kenelm.  The Closet of The Eminently Learned Sir Kenelm Digby, Kt., Opened -- Brewing & Cookery, 1677.  Falconwood Press.

Original recipes, no redactions.  See also the new release of Digby by Jane Stevenson and Peter Davidson.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Driver, Christopher and Michelle Berriedale-Johnson.  Pepys At Table: Seventeenth Century Recipes for the Modern Cook.  Berkeley & Los Angeles, California: University of California Press, 1984.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Drummond, J.C. and Anne Wilbrahim.  The Englishman's Food:  A History of Five Centuries of English Diet.  London, Reader's Union, 1959.
The author, a biochemist, presents good research and a good background on food.  The first section covers Medieval and Tudor cookery.  No recipes.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Edwards, John (ed.).  Roman Cookery, Revised.  Hartley & Marks, 1986.

Another translation of Apicius. Few original recipes; mostly redactions, but the ones I've been able to check seem reasonable.
Reviewed by:  Arwen.
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Elliott, Tom F..  A Taste of Olde Englande.  Elliott Publications, 1977.  ISBN:  0-903-975-91-2.
Some original recipes, but many without citations.  Not many redactions.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Evelyn, John.  John Evelyn, Cook.  Devon, Prospect Books, 1997.  ISBN 0-907325-653.
Recipes are presented as written and are not redacted.  Good index and glossary.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Farb, Peter, and George Armelagos.  Consuming Passions.  Houghton Mifflin Company, 1980.
This is a book about the history of food, but not a cook book. It contains no recipes.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Fernández-Armesto, Felipe.  Near a Thousand Tables:  A History of Food.  New York, The Free Press, 2002.  ISBN:  0-7432-2644-5.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Fetiplace, Elynor.  Complete Receipt Book of Ladie Elynor Fetiplace, Vol. 1 and Vol. 2.  Stuart Press, 1999.

This is verbatim transcription of Elinor Fetiplace's book.  The books are  small, paperback pamphlets with little commentary and no redactions.  In many ways, though, they are easier to read and use than the Spurling hardback which injects so much commentary that the actual original text is lost.  Original recipes.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Arwen (Vol. 1), Elaina (Vol 1 & 2).
Flower, Barbara and Elisabeth Rosenbaum..  The Roman Cookery Book: A Critical Translation of 'The Art of Cooking' by Apicius, For Use In The Study And The Kitchen.  London: George G. Harrap & C, 1958 (also 1974, 1980).
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  (Arwen wants one ...)
Forster, Robert and Orest Ranum.  Food and Drink in History:  Selections from the Annales Economies, Sociétés, Civilisations, Vol. 5.  Baltimore/London; The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1979.  ISBN:  0-8018-2156-6 ppbk.
Essays about a varitety of topics, such as, "Toward The History of Nutrition," and "The Potato in the Eighteenth Century."
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Freeman, Bobby.  Traditional Food From Wales.  New York, Hippocrene Books, 1997.  ISBN:  0-7818-0527-9.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Freeman, Margaret B..  Herbs For The Medieval Household.  New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1997.
Originally published in 1941.  Some useful information on medieval and renaissance uses for herbs.
Reviewed by:  Arwen.
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Friedman, David (writing as Cariadoc of the Bow) and Diana Alene, ed.. A Collection of Medieval and Renaissance Cookbooks.  Cambridge, Massachusetts: Societa Illuminata ex uno plures, 1978 (3rd edition), 1993 (6th edition).

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.  The original SCA source book.  For almost a decade this was pretty much all that was available in the US on Renaissance cooking. Duke Cariadoc made photcopies of various out-of-print cookbooks available at Oxford and other libraries in England and then published the compiled photcopies in a soft-bound, self-printed volume. Many of these books are now available in updated English-language editions.  But you can't go wrong for the variety and the price. Many, many original recipes.  Very few redactions. You can order this book directly from Cariadoc.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina, Eric (3rd and 6th editions), Arwen, Melissa (6th editon).
Friedman, David, and Elizabeth Cook (writing as Cariadoc of the Bow and Elizabeth).  A Miscelleny.  Illinois: Privately published..

A variety of poems, essays, articles, and recipes. Also available on the web.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina (5th edition), Melissa (6th edition), Eirene (edition unknown).
Gent, W. I..  A True Gentlewoman's Delight.  Falconwood Press.

Original date of publication: 1653.  Original recipes, no redactions.  Post SCA period, but many recipes are similar to ones found in late-period sources.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Gerard, John.  The Herbal, or General History of Plants.  Dover Books, 1975.
Our original review listed this book as being out of print and hard to find, but the Dover Books website lists it as being in print once again.  The hardcover edition is a huge book (14" tall and over 5" thick, with nearly 1,700 pages) with a green slipcover.
Reviewed by:  Elaina (updated by Arwen).
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Giacosa, Ilaria G. (author) and Anna Herklotz (trans.).  A Taste of Ancient Rome.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992.  ISBN:  0-226-29032-8.

This is the best version of Apicius available for historical cooks. There is lots of commentary, translations of the original recipes are included as are excellent redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Gitlitz, David M., and Linda Kay Davidson.  A Drizzle of Honey:  The Lives and Recipes of Spain's Secret Jews.  St. Martin's Press, 1999.

A fascinating account of the Inquisition's search and persecution of closeted Jews in late period, based upon trial testimony relating to their eating and cooking habits; NOT recommended for recipes, which are largely "made up" and improvised-- only a few actual period recipes are cited.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Aethelind.
Goodwin.  A Pretty Dinner: The Samuel Pepys Cookery Book.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Eric.
Goodwin.  Sallets and Salmagundis.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Eric.
Grant, Mark (trans.).  Anthimus:  On the Observance of Food.  Devon: Prospect Books, 1996.

This is not a cookbook, but a treatise on health and diet from Carolingian France. It's an interesting read and does have an early period reference to honey butter. Anthimus suggests its use for invalids and people with consumption who should lay on their backs and have the honey butter mixture dripped into their mouths.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Grant, Mark (trans.).  Roman Cookery: Ancient Recipes for Modern Kitchens.  Serif, 1999.

This is one of the most schizophrenic cookbooks I've ever seen. Grant's redactions are based on complete recipes, incomplete fragments, and assorted "mentions" of foods and cooked dishes. Sources range from previously unpublished ancient Greek sources, to Anthimus, to a 10th century treatise, and everything in between. Grant's redactions range from relatively faithful to entirely made up. I would only recommend this book to the highly experienced cook who knows how to separate the wheat from the chaff (and even then, I have my reservations). There are some nice previously unpublished sources in here, but very little relevant to our period.
Reviewed by:  Allegra.
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Grewe, Rudolph and Constance B. Hieatt.  Libellus de arte coquinaria: An Early Northern Cookbook.  Tempe, Arizona: Arizona Center For Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2001.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Hackwood, Frederick.  Good Cheer: The Romance of Food and Feasting.  Detroit: Singing Tree Press, 1968.

Originally published in 1911, much of what is in this book has been superceded by subsequent research.
Reviewed by:  Arwen.
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Hagen, Ann.  A Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Food.  Anglo-Saxon Books, 1994.

This is not a cookbook -- sorry, there are no Anglo-Saxon cookbooks. This scholarly book describes the foods, food sources, markets, crops, and eating habits of the Anglo-Saxon period.  It uses literary and archaeological sources.  An excellent work.  The best information that there is available.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Hale, William Harlan.  The Horizon Cookbook and Illustrated History of Eating and Drinking through the Ages.  American Heritage Publishing Co., Inc.,1968.

NOT RECOMMENDED.  This boxed, two-volume set had its day, and it's long since past. There is better historical information out there, and the recipes are useless.
Reviewed by:  Elaina?
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Hammond, P.W.  Food and Feast in Medieval England.  Alan Sutton Publishing Limited, 1995.

No recipes, but a very nice scholarly work dealing with all aspects of medieval food -- the production and distribution of food, what various people ate, nutritional aspects, and more.  An easy and informative read, good for someone who's ready to delve a little deeper into the subject of period cuisine.  Also has some nice illustrations and photographs.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Hampson, John.  English At Table.  Collins, 1946.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Hartley, Dorothy.  Food in England.  London: Futura Publications, 1985; also MacDonald and Jane's, 1979.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina, Eric.
Henisch, Bridget Ann.  Cakes & Characters, An English Christmas Tradition.  Devon: Prospect Books, 1984.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Henisch, Bridget Ann.  Fast and Feast:  Food in Medieval Society.  The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1997.

No recipes, but an excellent scholarly work on many aspects of period food.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Henisch, Bridget Ann.  The Medieval Calendar Year.  The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999.

Information on annual period timetables for planting, harvesting, animal husbandry-- no recipes but can be of interest to the serious student of period cookery.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:
Hess, Karen, transcriber.  Martha Washington's Booke of Cookery.  Columbia University Press, 1995.

The title is very misleading-- the receipt book was a family heirloom at one time in the care of Martha Washington, but she may have never used any of the recipes. The recipes were written down in the 17th century, and Hess feels they represent a span from mid 16th century to about 1625. The book is especially nice for the notes Hess includes after some of the recipes.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene.
Heuser, Marie (as Mistress Katherine de Kane), ed..  Ex Porcinate.  The Caerthan Cooks Guild (privately published).

An SCA publication from A.S. 19.  Like many others of its era, it has been superceded by later works.  Few or no period recipes; much of what is included is "ethnic" or "traditional".  Still an interesting piece of local (Caerthen) history.
Reviewed by:  Arwen.
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene.
Hieatt, Constance B.  An Ordinance of Pottage.  Devon: Prospect Books, 1988.

15th century English original recipes, including redactions for most of them; excellent source.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Hieatt, Constance B., and Robin F. Jones.  "Two Anglo-Norman Culinary Collections Edited from British Library Manuscripts Additional 32085 and Royal 12.C.xii"  Speculum 61/4 (1986):  pp. 859-882.
Article containing what are currently the earliest known English recipes.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:
Hieatt, Constance B., and Sharon Butler.  Curye on Inglysch: English Culinary Manuscripts of the Fourteenth Century, including The Forme of Cury.  Oxford: Oxford University Press (for Early English Texts Society), 1985.

Excellent source of English recipes from the 1300s, no redactions.  A good glossary is included to help understand and translate the recipes. Novices or those who have no prior experience with Middle English may find this source intimidating at first.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Hieatt, Constance B., and Sharon Butler.  Pleyn Delit: Medieval Cookery for Modern Cooks, First Edition.

The classic first editon.  The second edition is better, but this is an excellent and very worthwile source.  Original recipes included with modern redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Eirene, Elaina.
Hieatt, Constance B., Brenda Hosington, and Sharon Butler.  Pleyn Delit: Medieval Cookery for Modern Cooks, Second Edition.  Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996.  ISBN:  0-8020-7632-7.

VERY HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.  The second edition is highly recommended above the first, as the authors' knowledge expanded greatly and there are corrections and modifications to many recipes, as well as the addition of many new ones.  This is a classic source, and very highly recommended, especially for those new to period cookery.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Hinson, Janet (trans.).  Le Menagier de Paris.

Printed and bound copy of the on-line version.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene.
Hoadley, Michael.  Roman Herbal.  Newcastle Upon Tyne: J&P Bealls, Ltd., 1991.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Hodge, F. Vere, (ed.).  Abbot's Kitchen.  Glastonbury Abbey Trustees, 1979.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Hodgett, G. A. J.  Stere Htt Well: Medieval recipes and remedies from Samuel Pepys' Library.  Cornmarket Reprints, 1972.

First-- if you should come to own this book, tear out the introduction by Delia Smith and burn it! It only serves to continue many of the old and unpleasant myths about medieval cookery. That said, the book contains a cookery and medicinal manuscript dating from the late 1400s. The manuscript is reproduced on the right hand pages, with the modern English translation on the left. The cookery recipes are mixed in with the medicinal preparations, which is sometimes a little... unappetizing. Out of 80+ entries, less than 35 are culinary recipes. There are original recipes only, and no redactions. This book often commands a high price on the used market (and one gets a relatively small number of recipes out of it), so I recommend it primarily to those who already have a large cookery library and want to complete their collection. Still, there are a few really nice recipes I haven't seen in other sources!
Reviewed by:  Allegra.
Who has a copy:
Iseult of Broceliande (pseud.).  The Best of The Watched Pot, Vol. I and II.  Alfarhaugr Publishing Society.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Isitt, Verity.  Take a Buttock of Beefe.  Ashford Press, 1987.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Lorwin, Madge.  Dining With William Shakespeare.  Atheneum, 1972.

This book contains a series of complete menus based upon quotes from Shakespeare's plays. The book gives original recipes as well as Lorwin's redactions (most of which are reasonably acceptable). Unfortunately, the bulk of the recipes date to well after Shakespeare's death, and so are out of our period. However, there is a good store of historic information related to food and drink in Shakespearean times that the reader will find interesting. This book is considered "rare" and thus typically commands a "rare" price on the used market. Due to the high price, this book is recommended, but only to the individual looking to "complete" his/her collection.
Reviewed by:  Allegra.
Who has a copy:
Markham, Gervase (author), and Michael R. Best (ed.).  The English Housewife.  McGill-Queen's University Press, 1998.

Critical edition of Markham's 1615 work, nice collection of late period and Jacobean recipes.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Martino.  Epulario, Or, The Italian Banquet.  UMI Microfilms.

1598 English translation, printed in London.  Microfilmed copy of an actual Elizabethan cookbook; excellent source for period recipes, no redactions.  This is a period  English translation of an earlier Italian book.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:
Martino.  Epulario: Or The Italian Banquet.  Falconwood Press, 1990.

1598 English translation of an earlier Italian source.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Kate.
Mason, Laura.  Sugar Plums and Sherbets: The Prehistory of Sweets.  Devon: Prospect Books, 1998.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
McGregor, Pat (writing as Siobhan Medhbh O'Roarke).  Traveling Dysshes, or, Foods for Wars, Peace, and Pot-lucks.  Privately Published, 1996.

A good and inexpensive starter book containing a nice collection of various original recipes and their redactions, though it should be noted that it also contains a number of conjectural recipes as well. This is an SCA specific book, contributed to by many cooks.  Includes some information on where to obtain spices and ingredients.  Was out of print, but the new edition has now been published.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:
McKendry, Maxime (author), Arabella Boxer (ed.).  The Seven Centuries Cookbook.  Treasure Press, 1983.

See notes under de la Falaise, Maxime: Seven Hundred Years of English Cooking -- this book is published alternately under both titles.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Mennell, Stephen.  All Manner of Food.  University of Illinois Press, 1996.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Milham, Mary Ella.  Platina:  On Right Pleasure and Good Health.  Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1998.

New critical edition of Platina-- HIGHLY RECOMMENDED; excellent source for 15th century Italian recipes, no redactions.  This edition contains the original Latin and Milham's English translation on facing pages.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Milham, Mary Ella.  Platina:  On Right Pleasure and Good Health.  Pegasus Press, 1999.

This is the paperback version of Milham's Platina (above).  It contains the translated text, and the commentary, but not the Latin.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Mistress Katrine de Baillie du Chat, O.L. (pseud.).  How to Cook Forsoothly.  Albuquerque, New Mexico: Raymond's Quiet Press, 1979.

Elaina:  This book tells us about  the latest and greatest in SCA cooking  - in A.S. 13.  It has some interesting and useful information - a great deal of work went into it - much of it is outdated for SCA use today.
Allegra:  There was a time and a place for this cookbook, and I think the time has passed.  While there certainly are some original recipes with redactions in the volume, some of the stuff is "made up," and the book has never been particularly easy for the eyes to read.
Reviewed by:  Allegra, Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina, Eric, Tatiana.
Morman, Mary (ed.).  European Cooking: From Rome to the Renaissance -- Proceedings of the Conference.  Privately Published, 2000.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Nutter, Terry (as Katerine Rountre).  A Beginner's Book of Meal Planning For the Current Middle Ages, 2nd Edition.  Tulsa, Oklahoma; privately published, 1993, 1997.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Nutter, Terry (as Katerine Rountre).  A Beginner's Book of Receipts for the Current Middle Ages, 2nd Edition:  25 Recipes from England and France in the 14th and 15th Centuries.  Tulsa, Oklahoma; privately published, 1993..
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Oxford, A. W..  Notes from A Collector's Catalogue: With a Bibliography of English Cookery Books.  John and Edward Bumpus, 1909.

I don't actually have this whole book in my collection.  What I do have is a photocopy of the chapter dealing with early English printed cookbooks, up to the year 1699.  This was most useful in helping me to know what cookbooks to look for on the UMI microfilms.
Reviewed by:  Allegra.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Par, I..  The Treasurie of Commodious Conceits, & Hidden Secrets, and may be called, The Huswiues Closet, of Healthfull Prouision.  UMI Microfilms.

1573 London edition.  Microfilmed copy of an actual Elizabethan cookbook; excellent source for period recipes, no redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:
Paston-Williams, Sara.  A Book of Historical Recipes.  National Trust, 1995.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Paston-Williams, Sara.  The Art of Dining, A History of Cooking and Eating.  London: National Trust Enterprises, Ltd..

Huge coffee-table book with excellent illustrations and  lots of commentary.  There are some redacted recipes along with their original sources.  Nice but expensive and only available in England.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Peachey, Stuart.  The Gourmet Guide:  1580-1600.  Bristol, Stuart Press, 1995.  ISBN 1-85804-053-1.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Platina.  De Honesta Vouptate.  Falconwood Press.

Transcription of the original text, from the Mallinkrodt translation.  The Milham translation is both better and easier to read.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene.
Platina (Elizabeth Buermann Andrews, trans.).  De Honesta Voluptate.  Mallinkrodt Chemical Works, 1967.

For years this was the only English translation of Platina available - and it was out of print.  It's a privately published book in a black slipcase that has the Latin on one page and the English (literal) translation on the facing page.  Little to no commentary.  Many typos - the book is literally typed on a typewriter, not typeset.  With the publication of Milham's Platina, this book becomes a curiousity for collectors. Original text.  No redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Platt, Sir Hugh.  The Accomplisht Ladys Delight in Preserving, Physick and Cookery, #19976.  UMI Microfilms.

Date of this edition unknown, late 17th century.  Microfilmed copy of Platt (which was originally published in first decade of 17th century).  This much later edition may have been liberally added to, and not accurately reflect the earlier edition.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:
Pouncy, Carolyn Johnston.  The Domostroi: Rules for Russian Households in the Time of Ivan the Terrible.  Cornell University Press, 1994.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Prescott, James (writing as Thorvall Grimsson).  Le Viandier Taillevent.  Eugene, Oregon: Alfarhaugr Publishing Society, Inc., 1987.

Original translation of a 14th century French manuscript.  One of the basic sources for Renaissance cooking.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina, Eric, Tatiana.
Pynson, R.? (might be printer).  This is the Boke of Cokery (for a noble prince's household?) #3297.  UMI Microfilms.
Originally printed in 1500.  Allegra: The copy available from UNM's microfilm collection is almost completely illegible. I understand that people with access to other UMI microfilm collections have been able to get more readable copies.  If you find a better one, let me know!
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:
Ramsey, D A.  Breakfast at Bradgate.  Volcano Publishing, 1996.  ISBN:  1-89884-06-9.

Describes the kitchens and some account book entries for the 17th century estate at Bradgate in England. Not documented. Not worth much. Barely even interesting in small doses.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Redon, Odile and Francois Sabban and Silvano Serventi.  La Gastronomie au Moyen Age (French Language).  Editions Stock, 1991.

Original French edition of Redon's Medieval Kitchen. This book has different illustrations than the English edition, but essentially the same text.  Contains original recipes in French and modern French redactions. Available in France at several museums (like the Cluny in Paris) and historical sites. If you read French, this is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Redon, Odile, Francois Sabban, and Silvano Serventi.  Medieval Kitchen.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. English edition of La Gastronomie au Moyen Age.  If you need to buy only one period cooking book, buy this one.  It is the English version of the French original and  has slightly different illustrations.  It has excellent material on Late Medieval/Early Renaissance food, dining, and cooking and then presents a variety of original recipes from French and Italian sources in English translation with commentary and modern English redactions. The original untranslated text of each recipe is also available in an appendix.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Renfrew, Jane.  Food & Cooking in Roman Britain.  English Heritage Press, 1985.  ISBN:  1-85074-080-1.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Renfrow, Cindy.  A Sip Through Time.  Privately Published: Cindy Renfrow, 1994.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina, Guillaume.
Renfrow, Cindy.  Take a Thousand Eggs or More - A Collection of Fifteenth Century Recipes, Volumes 1 and 2 (First and Second Editions).  Privately Published: Cindy Renfrow, 1990, 1998.

Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Eirene, Elaina, Tatiana (1990 and 1998), Arwen (1998).
Renfrow, Cindy and Fleming, Elise.  The Colorful Cook.  1999.
Draft edition of a recent Compleat Anachronist.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene.
Riley, Gillian.  A Feast for the Eyes.  National Gallery Publications Limited, 1997.

Another one of Riley's art books, containing primarily modern recipes inspired by historic art in the National Gallery. Buy it for the art, which is beautiful, but not for the recipes.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:
Riley, Gillian.  Painters and Food: Renaissance Recipes.  Pomegranate Artbooks, 1983.

A pleasant little picture book with some good Renaissance paintings of food. There are  modern recipes with no documentation and no original source texts.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Rögnvaldardóttir, Nanna.  Icelandic Food and Cookery.  New York, Hippocrene Books, 2002.  ISBN 0-7818-0878-2.
Mostly modern recipes; however, foreward has good historical information.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Root, Waverly.  Food:  An Authoritative and Visual History and Dictionary of the Foods of the World.  Konecky & Konecky, 1980.

No recipes, but a fabulous dictionary of just about any food or food object or spice or whatever you can think of.  Tons of illustrations.  Loads of excellent and relevant historical information is found here, and can often clear up common myths and confusion.  Highly informative, and often very funny-- whenever you start taking yourself too seriously, this is the book to open!
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Tatiana.
Rose, Peter G., (trans. and ed.).  The Sensible Cook:  Dutch Foodways in the Old and the New World.  Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1989.

Translation of a late 17th century Dutch cookbook, in  which some of the recipes were copied from a late 16th century cookbook-- unfortunately, we don't yet know which ones come from the earlier source!
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Rousseau, Anne Marie.  Compleat Anachronist #102:  French Food In The Renaissance.  Society for Creative Anachronism.

Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Ruthven (Lord).  The Ladies Cabinet, Enlarged and Opened, 1655 (Parts 1 & 3 only).  Falconwood Press, 1990.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Sambrook, Pamela and Peter Breares (editors).  Country House Kitchen, The 1650-1900.  National Trust, 1996.

The first chapters of this coffee-table book have some nice pictures and comments on castle kitchens.  No recipes.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Santich, Barbara.  The Original Mediterranean Cuisine: Medieval Recipes for Today.  Chicago Review Press, 1995.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.This is one of the half dozen books that every SCA cook should own. An excellent assortment of period recipes from various sources throughout Mediterranean (French, Spanish, Italian, and Arabic) -- includes originals, translations, and Santich's own excellent redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Sass, Lorna.  To The King's Taste: Richard II's Book of Feasts and Recipes Adapted for Modern Cooking.  New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1975.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Branwyn, Eirene, Elaina, Eric.
Sass, Lorna.  To The Queen's Taste: Elizabethan Feasts and Recipes Adapted for Modern Cooking.  Norwich: Fletcher and Son Ltd. 1976.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Branwyn, Eirene, Elaina, Eric.
Schoonover, Daniel.  Ladie Borlase's Receiptes Booke.  University of Iowa Press, 1998.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Scully, D. Eleanor and Terence Scully (editors).  Early French Cookery.  University of Michigan Press, 1995.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Scully is "the" expert in Renaissance French food.  His book contains commentary and recipes.  Each recipe has the original French, a translation, and a modern redaction.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Scully, Terence.  The Art of Cookery in the Middle Ages.  Boydell Press, 1995.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Scully, Terence.  The Vivendier:  A Fifteenth Century Cooking Manuscript.  Devon: Prospect Books, 1997.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Scully, Terence (ed.).  Cuoco Napoletano: Neapolitan Recipe Collection.  University of Michigan Press, 2000.

This is Scully's newest book on the Catalan cooking manuscripts. Lots of original recipes, but no redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Scully, Terence (ed.).  Viandier of Taillevent.  University of Ottawa Press, 1988.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Scully, Terence (trans.).  Chiquart's 'On Cookery'.  American University Studies, 1986.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Sim, Alison.  Food & Feast in Tudor England.  St. Martin's Press, 1997.

NOT RECOMMENDED. This is not a cookbook.  And it's not a very good history book either.  Poor documentation and propagates a number of the standard myths of medieval cooking.  Pass it up.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Smith, Eliza.  Compleat Housewife.  Studio Editions, 1994.  ISBN:  1-85891-121-4.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Spurling, Hilary.  Elinor Fettiplace's Receipt Book: Elizabethan Country House Cooking.  Elizabeth Sifton Books, 1986.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Stapleton, Cy (ed.).  The Renaissance Gourmet.  Lufkin, Texas: House of Gutenberg, 1989.

NOT RECOMMENDED. Billed as "a collection of authentic early English and European recipes, sprinkled with a few more modern but appropriate delicacies," this book contains no original recipes, and mostly "traditional" dishes (potato soup, tomato casserole, etc.), collected from artisans on the renaissance fair circuit.  Some of the recipes sound yummy, but none are documentably period.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Stevenson, Jane and Peter Davidson.  The Closet of Sir Kenelm Digby Opened.  Devon: Prospect Books, 1997.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Symons, Michael.  A History of Cooks and Cooking.  Devon:  Prospect Books, 2001.  ISBN:  1-903018-07-2 (ppbk); 0-252-02580-6 (hardcover).
Paperback (left); hardcover (right).
Summary of many aspects of cooks and cookery though the ages, though much of the material is post-SCA period.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Tannahill, Reay.  Food in History.  Stein and Day, 1973.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Toussant-Samat, Maguelonne and Anthea Bell (trans.).  History of Food.  New York: Barnes and Noble, 1998.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene.
T'Sivia bas Tamara v'Amberview.  The Complete Dagger Lickin' Good.  Privately Published.

NOT RECOMMENDED. A book whose time has come and gone.  There is some helpful feast planning information in the back.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eric.
Visser, Margaret. The Rituals of Dinner. Grove Press, 1991.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Walk, Marian (writing as Mistress Marian of Edwinstone).  Possets, Caudles, Syllabubs and Other Drinks of the Medieval and Renaissance Periods.  Boston, Massachusetts: Cook's Guild, Barony of Carolingia, 1984.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Warren, Janet.  A Feast of Scotland. Little, Brown & Co, 1979.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Eric.
Wason, Betty.  Cooks, Gluttons, and Gourmets: A History of Cookery.  Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Co., 1962.

NOT RECOMMENDED.  Claims to be "the first book of its kind in the English Language," which is a dubious claim, since there are other "history of cookery" books on this list which pre-date it.  Yet another book that was fine in its day, but which has since been superceded by more recent research.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Webb, Margaret.  Early English Recipes.  Cambridge At The University Press, 1937.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Wheaton, Barbara Ketcham.  Savoring The Past.  Simon and Schuster, 1983.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
White, Eileen.  Soup:  The English Kitchen.  Devon; Prospect Books 2003.  ISBN 1-903-018-08-0.
Some recipes from Form of Cury; introductory chapter includes a good summary of the history of soup.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
White, Eileen.  The English Cookery Book:  Historical Essays.  Leeds Symposium on Food History, "Food and Society" Series.  Devon; Prospect Books 2004.  ISBN:  1-903018-36-6.
Chapters on "The Language of Medieval Cookery," and "A Close Look At The Composition of Sir Hugh Plat's 'Delightes for Ladies'" will be of special interest to the SCA cook.
Reviewed by:  Elaina.
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Willan, Anne.  Great Cooks & Their Recipes from Taillevent to Escoffier.  McGraw-Hill, 1977.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Wilson, C. Anne.  Food and Drink in Britain.  Academy Chicago Publishers, 1991.  ISBN:  0-89733-364-0 (hardcover).

Not a recipe book, but a survey of the evolution of food and drink in Britain.  Formerly out of print; now available in paperback.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Wilson, C. Anne.  Banquetting Stuffe: The Fare and Social Background of the Tudor and Stuart Banquet (Food and Society, No. 1).  Edinburgh University Press, 1991.

Not just a cookbook, but a treatise on all aspects of the Elizabethan "banquet" -- what we  would call "the dessert course".  There are a number of original recipes (many with redactions), but there's also information on how the foods were presented, the serving utensils used, and even a subsection on "The Aphrodesiac Nature of 'Banquetting Stuffe'." A must-have for students of late-period cookery.  Highly Recommended.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Eirene, Elaina.
Wilson, C. Anne (ed.).  The Appetite And The Eye: Visual Aspects of Food And Its Presentation Within Their Historic Context (Food And Society Series).  Edinburgh University Press, 1991.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen.
Woodman, Marian.  Food & Cooking in Roman Britain.  Cotswald District Council, 1985.
Menus and translations from Apicius; no redactions.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Elaina.
Zyvatkauskas, Betty and Sonia Zyvatkauskas.  Eating Shakespeare: Recipes and More From The Bard's Kitchen.  Toronto: Prentice Hall Canada, 2000.
Reviewed by:
Who has a copy:  Arwen, Elaina.
Note:  Bibliographic information was prepared using the MLA standards for scholarly publications.

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