DEATH IS EASY

by

Russell Madden

 
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FREEDOM, As If It Mattered
by
Russell Madden
 
 
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Russell Madden's Writing:

Index of Articles by Topic

 



(This index groups my nonfiction writing according to the main topic addressed in each piece.)

(Given that many articles touch on a number of related issues, the divisions here may overlap.)

Books and Movies
Communication
Constitution and the Courts
Crime
Cultural and Social Controversies
Education
Environment
Fascism and the Police State
Freedom
Government Interference and the Nanny State
History
Humor
Involuntary Servitude and Slavery
Medicine and Health Care
Myths
Personal Development and Values
 
Politics and Government
Privacy and Identification Cards
Property Rights
Ayn Rand and Objectivism
Responsibility
Rights
Safety
Science
Self-Defense and Guns
Smoking
Taxes
Terrorists and Terrorism
Voting
War (Iraqi War and War, in General)
F. Paul Wilson Reviews and Interview

 

 
Books and Movies
 
"Bashing Business." A review of The Business of Commerce by James Chesher and Tibor Machan. A moral defense of business.
"Books and a Movie." Capsule reviews of five novels and the movie "Bronco Billy."
Classical Individualism: The Supreme Importance of Each Human Being, by Tibor Machan. A review. The significance of being an individual.
"Colossus": a new look at an old movie. When a computer dictator becomes loveable.
"Crossing Jack." In the new Repairman Jack novel, Crisscross, by F. Paul Wilson, Jack's "fix-its" entwine in ways that test the core of his being.
"Dean Koontz, Dark Rivers of the Heart." A review.
"Freedom Friendly Fiction." Rarely are liberty-oriented stories set in a contemporary society in which freedom is the default position and largely in the background. My detective novel, Death Is Easy, may be one of the first.
"Gateways to Hidden Worlds" A review of Gateways by F. Paul Wilson. Repairman Jack journeys to the Everglades and becomes acquainted with a stranger: his dad. (Original title: "Gateways: A Review.")
"The Haunted Air." A review of The Haunted Air by F. Paul Wilson. Repairman Jack tackles the irrational and risks all he holds dear.
"Hoping for 'What If...'" A review of Hope by Aaron Zelman and L. Neil Smith.
Implant by F. Paul Wilson, A Review. (Short Version). Medicine versus freedom. Long version (w/ commentary on health care.)
"Infernal Wisdom." A review of F. Paul Wilson's, Infernal, a Repairman Jack novel. Jack and his brother, Tom, meet, at last...much to Jack's dismay.
"Jack of All Trades." A review of All the Rage by F. Paul Wilson. Repairman Jack faces more than one kind of demon...
A Letter to Reason re: Loren Lomasky's Review of Machan's Generosity.
A Letter to Reason re: Loren Lomasky's Review of Kelley's Unrugged Individualism.
"The Measure of a Man." A review of Sims by F. Paul Wilson. Genetically-modified worker apes make life easier for those who lease them. But are these creatures "property"...or persons?
"Of Parasites and Hosts." A review of Hosts by F. Paul Wilson. Repairman Jack meets his sister.
"Terminal Limits." Review of Term Limits by Vince Flynn. Perhaps this author is on to something...
"Nathaniel Branden, Taking Responsibility: Self-Reliance and the Accountable Life," October, 1996.
 
Communication
 
"Communication and Causality: Cognition or Interaction? The Why of It All." Are humans except from causality? What is causality and how does that concept influence our theories of communication? [N.B.: the discussion of causality in this earlier piece is essentially identical to what I adapted for my essay, "Freedom and Causality."]
"Expectations, Values, and Groups." An academic analysis of expectancy-value theories.
"Individualism, Interdependence, and Interpersonal Conflict." An academic look at an important question: Does being an individualist lead to more conflict?
The Integrative Perspective: Sample Chapters: IP Introduction; IP Chapter 1; IP Chapter 2 An objective approach to communication. The foundations for "To Understand and Be Understood."
"Media, Effects, and Politics." An analysis of the strong and weak media effects models and how politicians stick with the one that, though discredited, supports their abuses of freedom.
"Romantic Love: Youthful Fantasy or Mature Reality? The Maintenance of Passion." A look at the nature of romantic love along with a proposed research study to measure it.
"The Self: From Stimulus to Cognition." An academic analysis of theories of self in communication.
"The 'Self' Revisited." A reply to Michael Huemer's critique of "The Self: From Stimulus to Cognition."
"To Understand and Be Understood." The proper principles of interpersonal communication.
 
Constitution and the Courts
 
"Castles No More." The Supreme Court undermines objective law while violating our privacy.
"Constitutional Suicide." Those statists who spout the slogan, "The Constitution is not a suicide pact," are out to destroy what stands in their way.
"Courting Disaster." Too many courts and justices have become unprincipled tools of our political system.
"Getting the Bill of Rights Right." An Objectivist interpretation.
"Hoisting the Flag." Calls for a Constitutional amendment against "flag desecration" reveal too much about the ability of proponents to think critically and the level of their commitment to freedom
"Invisible Rights." Those who claim that we only have the rights explicitly mentioned in the Constitution are as bad as those who say we do not have the rights that are directly mentioned there. (Published as "Assault Weapons and Invisible Rights.")
"Let It Burn." Cross-burning may be stupid and usually racist, but freedom demands that a person has the right to be stupid and racist on his own property or that of his friends. (Published as "Let the Crosses Burn.")
"The Little Things That Count." The Supreme Court has opened the door to police abuse by sanctioning arrest and jail for even small transgressions. A prime example of the principle that "bad laws lead to bad law enforcement." (Published as "Little Things: Harassment by Laws and Law Enforcement.")
 
Crime
 
"Crime: Public and Private." Comparing private criminals with the crimes of government.
"Good Cop, Bad Cop." The relationship between police and citizens seems to have changed from "service and protection" to "intimidation, domination, and control." What does this say about freedom in America?
"You Are a Criminal." The myriad web of laws entangling us ensures that you are a crook.
 
Cultural and Social Controversies
 
"Abortion: A Philosophical and Scientific Approach." An objective approach to a contentious issue
"The Best of Intentions." Multiculturalism.
"Counting on Greed." The Census Bureau knows its customers well.
"Defending Welfare." Pragmatic, utilitarian arguments eventually lose out to ones based on morality.
"The Fat of the Land." Anti-discrimination laws move to protect fat people...and limit freedom.
"Flag Burning." Reply to American Legion question.
"Getting to the Bottom." A hike to the bottom of the Grand Canyon reveals important lessons we, as a society, would do well to learn if we value freedom.
"Hatred Is Not a Crime." Hate crimes destroy a crucial pillar of justice and individualism.
"A Judgment to Rush." Radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh admits he is addicted to painkillers after the police begin an investigation. Honesty would demand Limbaugh denounce the Drug War as an affront to freedom and rights as he struggles to overcome his bad choices. But don't hold your breath.
A Letter to George H. Smith re: Capital Punishment and Inalienable Rights.
"A Merry Un-PC Christmas." Those overly-sensitive to offending folks over the holidays need to lighten up.
"The Miracle of Voting." Say the magic words, "We voted for this," and the impossible becomes reality...at least in the minds of too many Americans.
"Mothers Against Common Sense." MADD's jihad against drinking has degenerated into pure emotionalism.
"Nigger-Nigger-Nigger." Blurring the distinction between words and deeds has reached levels that endanger basic freedoms. (Published as "Nigger Nigger.")
"Not So Bad." People who excuse rights-violations by the State by saying, "It's not so bad. It could be worse," are selling out their lives -- and their liberty -- far too cheaply.
"Radical Reason." When the use of reason is viewed as "radical," what does that say about the state of our culture?
"Shattering the Glass Ceiling." Women's choices and career advancement.
"Speak for Yourself." Censorship can only be done by the State, not by those exercising their property rights.
Speech for Larry Hines, delivered at 1999 Hempfest rally in California.
"Suicide and the Choice to Live." A reply to Bill Dwyer.
"Teaching Resentment." The State's interference in the dissemination of ideas in our schools not only violates rights but exacerbates the very problems it is supposed to resolve.
"The Ups and Downs of Unemployment." How to deal with joblessness.
 
Education
 
"I Are a Student." Educational "reform" in Philadelphia schools may help in the short run. Long term, however, a fundamentally corrupt system cannot be "reformed." It can only be abandoned.
"Lower Education." The trends in education over the past century have created a society of people who are both ignorant and unable to think critically.
"One For the Books." The State should never be involved in the dissemination of ideas, whether in schools or bestsellers. (Published as "Stupid White Men and Textbook Censorship.")
"Subsidized Education." Examining the problems in higher education caused by government subsidies.
"Teaching Resentment." The State's interference in the dissemination of ideas in our schools not only violates rights but exacerbates the very problems it is supposed to resolve.
"Zero Tolerance." Acting according to rules rather than principles. Zero tolerance run amuck.
 
Environment
 
"Bio-Luddites." The latest anti-progress group targets biotech products. (Published as "Bio-Luddites Chow Down at McDonald's.")
"Eco-Fascism." Another land grab by the environmentalists.
"Government vs the Environment." The true enemy of the ecology.
"Patriots Day vs Earth Day." The attention paid to Earth Day and the avoidance of Patriots Day tells us too much about the state of our culture.
 
Fascism and the Police State
 
"American Fascism Revisited." A reexamination of Ayn Rand's 1962 speech, "The Fascist New Frontier," and its application to present-day society.
"Calling Out the Posse." Demands for changing or eliminating the Posse Comitatus Act -- preventing military law enforcement -- are dangerous.
"Cops and Robbers." The federalization of our police signals a dangerous trend against freedom.
"Good Cop, Bad Cop." The relationship between police and citizens seems to have changed from "service and protection" to "intimidation, domination, and control." What does this say about freedom in America?
"It's Unbelievable." Those who defend freedom face many hazards. Not the least among them are those who refuse to believe what the State is capable of doing. (Published as "Hazard Pay for Freedom Fighters.")
"Money for Nothing, Death for Free." In the midst of tragedy, hands are out for money while murder-by-State continues unnoted.
"Police State, American Style." Is the United States a police state? Does it matter? Or...how "much" cancer must you have before you have cancer?
"You Might Be a Fascist..." Many of the beliefs common to citizens today are actually examples of a fascist politico-economic system.
 
Freedom
 
"The Crack in Liberty." A visit to Philadelphia and the Liberty Bell reveals how much liberty we have already lost.
"Defending Freedom." Advice for newcomers to the struggle for liberty.
"Extinguishing the Flame." The fire of freedom that once burned in America is flickering. How much longer before the last haven for liberty grows dark?
"Freedom and Causality." How ideas of causality relate to liberty.
"Freedom, By George." To pretend they are "free," most people today must warp their minds in a truly Orwellian fashion.
"I Belong to Me." At its most basic, freedom and morality are about who "owns" you: you or other people. There is only -- and can be only -- one right answer.
"The Freedom Quiz." How much do you understand and practice freedom? Take this quiz and find out...
"'Imposing' Freedom." Can you "force" someone to be free?
"Let Me Be Free." What so frightens most people about this simple request?
"Little Lessons in Larceny." How "sharing" undermines freedom.
"The Miracle of Voting." Say the magic words, "We voted for this," and the impossible becomes reality...at least in the minds of too many Americans.
"My Life: A Comic Adventure." The two most powerful -- and misunderstood -- words in human thought are "my life," as in, "My life belongs to me," and all that such a claim implies.
"My Precious." Despite the reality of its corrosive results, power is the prize sought after by nearly everyone today. Perhaps such people should pay more attention to the words and deeds of a handful of Hobbits...
"The New Slavery." Once in this country, people fought and died to escape slavery. Now, citizens clamor and plead to have the chains slapped on.
"On the Borderline." Many people who oppose freedom focus solely on borderline cases rather than acknowledge the reality of the freedom that should exist under normal situations.
"One Freedom." The indivisibility of freedom. One cannot be partially free.
"The Politics of Hate." There are many ways in which politics intrude into every aspect of life...but there is an alternative...
"Prospects for Freedom." In the tension between freedom and slavery, which will win out? (Published as "Computers and the Prospects for Freedom.")
"The Remnant." Statist and collectivists love concentrating people in small areas while simultaneously destroying the conditions necessary for such communities to work.
Speech for Larry Hines, Libertarian Candidate for President, 2000. Delivered at various places.
"Strike!" Many people strike to gain wealth at others' expense. Imagine if people came to realize that freedom is worth striking for, too... (Published as "Strikes and Guns for the State.")
"Taking Freedom Personally." Few people get upset as their freedom is robbed from them day-by-by. Passion is conspicuously absent in a realm that should be intensely personal.
"Taking Rights." Is it possible for peaceful individuals ever to have their fundamental rights "taken away" from them?
"Tell Me a Story." The Prometheus Awards reminds us that a good story can be the best way to promote freedom. (Published as "Freedom Stories.")
"Thank You, America." The citizens and politicians of America should be properly recognized for the full extent to which they support and defend freedom.
"Voting for Freedom." The speech a politician should give.
"Wanting Freedom." Many people claim that they want to be free, but is liberty what they really desire?
 
Government Interference and The Nanny State
 
"The Arrogance of Ignorance." Those who know the least about us and the world are the most eager to rule.
"Because I Need It." Wants are transformed into "needs" and then supposedly trump all objections.
"Because It's Important." If the "importance" of an activity to someone, somewhere, somehow justifies State involvement, then no limit to State power exists.
"Beware of Governments Bearing Gifts." If the State can do things for you, it can do things against you.
"Blackout...Or Blank-Out?" Even though 50 million people lost electric power, politicians are still incapable of seeing that freedom -- not control -- is better at providing human needs.
"Changing the Rules." When people appeal to the government to obtain outcomes they desire.
"Compassion." Our government is literally killing us with "kindness." (Published as "The Compassion Con.")
"Double-0 Nonsense: A License to Play." Licenses for toy guns and ID's for videogames? What's next?
"For the Children." How the government destroys freedom by appealing to the needs of children.
"For the Little Guy." Those who cry the loudest that they care the most about "the little guy" are the ones who are his greatest enemies.
"Getting Gassed." When the State seeks to "help" with high gas and electrical prices, watch your wallet.
"The Greatest Generation." The World War II generation did many good things. They also did much that was wrong.
"Have More Sex. Now!" A call for Brits to have more children is yet one more attempt by the State to intrude into the bedrooms of its citizens for the "good of society."
"Help Me! Or Else..." Our society generally avoids laws that mandate citizens be Good Samaritans, but we're awash in laws that accomplish the same goals more covertly.
"'I Don't Know How...'" Ignorance is not an excuse to turn to the State for help. (Published as "Must Big Mama Do Your Homework?")
"Learning Helplessness." The State tries to keep us helpless...and we are its willing accomplices.
"Legal Counterfeiting." While the State has long been known as a legal counterfeiter of money, dollars are not the only thing in our society it fakes.
"The Miracle of Voting." Say the magic words, "We voted for this," and the impossible becomes reality...at least in the minds of too many Americans.
"Money Is Time." People often tell us that "time is money." But what is even more important to realize is that when the State steals your money, it is actually "stealing" your life.
"Mother, May I?" Our rights have been reduced to privileges as the rule of law has been replaced by the rule of men. (Published as "How Big Mama Turned Rights into 'Privileges'.")
"Not So Bad." People who excuse rights-violations by the State by saying, "It's not so bad. It could be worse," are selling out their lives -- and their liberty -- far too cheaply.
"Or Else..." Extortion, government-style.
"The Perfect Solution." Ignoring reality and focusing on a false "perfection" as an excuse for state intervention. (Published as "The Perfect Solution to Drunk Driving.")
"Running the Country." Politicians operate from the conceit that it is they who run the country rather than individuals who run their own lives. Sadly, most people agree.
"'Something Should Be Done.'" Doing "something" -- anything -- in a crisis usually makes matters worse.
"Teaching Resentment." The State's interference in the dissemination of ideas in our schools not only violates rights but exacerbates the very problems it is supposed to resolve.
"Tribalism Triumphant." Some American Indians want to extort special favors from government in the name of their religion...and the State is happy to comply.
"When Do-Gooders Do Bad." The evils of those who would save us from ourselves.
"You Asked For It." The feds want to force businesses to pay for the privilege of being regulated by the regulators. What if that same idea worked for individuals?
"With Friends Like These." Government-private business partnerships create economic problems and violate the principles of freedom.
 
History
 
"Brothers in Blood." Much of what we "learned" about history in government schools simply wasn't so. The reputation of one of the "greatest" presidents is a case in point.
"Learning From the Past." Maybe we should treat our enemies as did Lincoln and FDR and the rest. Or maybe not. (Published as"Learning From Past Wars.")
"Rockefeller vs the United States." Far better to trust our nation's cultural icons to private hands than those of the government. A comparison between my experience visiting the Liberty Bell and Colonial Williamsburg, VA.
 
Humor
 
"Humor Against the State." Making fun of things can be a serious business. When it comes to fighting statism and collectivism, it's either laugh or start crying.
"Mr. Russell's Neighborhood." Perhaps if we were nicer to the statists and collectivists seeking control, they would give up their plans to take away our freedom. Sure, they would.
"Rampant Discrimination Exposed!" A tongue-in-cheek analysis of the group most discriminated against in our society...and the ludicrous nature of most claims of discrimination made by women and minorities.
"The Statist Dictionary: Word Control." Statists and collectivists attempt to control us by controlling the language we use. (Published as "The Statists' Dictionary: Word Control for Mind Control.")
"Wally's World." Attacks on Walmart hide assaults on self-determination, capitalism, and success itself...
 
Involuntary Servitude and Slavery
 
"The Best and the Worst." In making excuses for a corrupt State, many who profess to believe in freedom help to enslave us all. (Published as "Suck-Ups to the State.")
"Body Snatchers." Mandating organ donation is a logical extension of State power.
"The Forgotten Thirteenth: Slavery and Conscription." What part of "no involuntary servitude" don't the politicians understand? (Published as "Conscription and Slavery: The Forgotten Thirteenth.")
"I Belong to Me." At its most basic, freedom and morality are about who "owns" you: you or other people. There is only -- and can be only -- one right answer.
"Polite Slavery." When an advocate of involuntary servitude argues for its virtues, should the one he seeks to enslave remain calm and polite? (Published as "The Polite Slave.")
"The Roots of the Problem." On the twenty-fifth anniversary of the television miniseries, "Roots," many Blacks still do understand what freedom means. (Published as "The Lessons of Roots.")
"Shakedown." Reparations for slavery violates the principle of individual moral responsibility.
 
Medicine and Health Care
 
"Doctors Shrugged." Doctors are retiring from practice or starting other careers in ever greater numbers. Are they "shrugging" or is something else going on...?
"Medical Wrongs...and Rights." Is health care a right?
 
Myths
 
"The Myth of Animal Rights." Animals have no free will, no use for morality, and, hence, no rights.
"The Myth of Gun Violence." The mantra against "gun violence" blurs important differences in morality.
"The Myth of Market Failure." The enemies of freedom seek to blame the market for their own failings.
 
Personal Development and Values
 
"Courage and Convictions." Integrity means defending your values even in the face of opposition.
"Friendship and Loyalty." Egoism properly understood does not mean abandoning your friends.
"I Am Not Responsible." Politicians proclaim that none of us is responsible when we should be, yet we are supposed to be fully responsible in areas where control belongs to others.
"I Belong to Me." At its most basic, freedom and morality are about who "owns" you: you or other people. There is only -- and can be only -- one right answer.
"Is Honesty Always the Best Policy?" Not always...
"Pandering: The Redistribution of Virtue." Too many people today believe we should cater to the weaknesses of others; that we should tear down the good and praise the worthless.
"Poverty and Violence." Equating one's poverty with an act of violence reflects a bumper sticker mentality.
"The Success of Failure." How Edgar Rice Burroughs persevered to create Tarzan. (Published as "Tarzan: The Success of Failure.")
 
Politics and Government
 
"Equality Before the Law." When nonobjective law becomes the norm; penalizing disfavored groups.
"Government and Anarchy." Is relying upon a properly limited government or upon private, competing defense agencies the better way to achieve and preserve liberty?
"Interesting Times.". The State inverts what should be constant and unchanging and what should be open to personal choice. (Published as "Cursed by Interesting Times.")
"Kettles and Pots." Politicians have the amazing ability to issue moral indictments while they engage in far worse acts of immorality. (Published as "Politician Pot Calling the Enron Kettle Black.")
"Libertarian Arrogance." One man's freedom is another man's arrogance. Guess who's right.
"Living in the Real World." What constitutes the "real world" in politics and precisely who believes in a fantasy and who does not? (Originally: "The Horse's Mouth.")
"Media, Effects, and Politics." An analysis of the strong and weak media effects models and how politicians stick with the one that, though discredited, supports their abuses of freedom.
"The Miracle of Voting." Say the magic words, "We voted for this," and the impossible becomes reality...at least in the minds of too many Americans.
"Money Is Time." People often tell us that "time is money." But what is even more important to realize is that when the State steals your money, it is actually "stealing" your life.
"Oaths of Office." Who would be surprised when a politician does not honor his oath of office?
"The Perfection of the Market." If "perfection" means anything, the free market IS perfect.
"Presumed Guilty." Prior restraint, burden of proof, and logic are all issues in calls to ban cell phones in cars.
"Principles: Public and Private." The giant disconnect between thinking on issues public vs private.
"The Right vs the Left: A = A." The equality of Statists.
"Running the Country." Politicians operate from the conceit that it is they who run the country rather than individuals who run their own lives. Sadly, most people agree.
"Show Me the Evidence." Opponents of freedom care little for facts in their quest to push statism.
"You Should Be Thankful." Using the worst rather than the best for your standard does not help freedom. (Published as "Don't Thank the NRA.")
 
Privacy and Identification Cards
 
"Anti-Privacy Privacy." The State pretends to protect our medical privacy while granting itself full access to the most intimate details of our lives.
"Bank on It." Attempts to outlaw privacy in banking and money "laundering" are primarily concerned with making you less free. (Published as "The Looming Menace of Offshore Accounts.")
"Cash Out." L.A. County is upset with the underground, cash-only economy: they aren't getting their cut of the goods and are losing power. (Published as "The War on Cash.")
"Castles No More." The Supreme Court undermines objective law while violating our privacy.
"Identify Yourself." If the State demands you provide it with evidence of who you are, should you be required to comply?
"The Naked Truth." Soon, the State will know everything about you...whether you like it or not. (Published as "Naked Surveillance.")
"Perfect Security." The French are planning a "perfectly secure" national identification card. How long before they -- and our own government -- institute chip implants when the "perfect security" of their cards fails?
"Return to Sender." The United States Post Office wants to create "smart" stamps with embedded links to your identity. The policy won't control criminals, but it will be another step in controlling citizens.
"To Chip or Not to Chip." Convenience is great, but how much are we willing to pay for it? The implantable VeriChip tests the boundaries between freedom and convenience as the State looks on with barely veiled interest.
"Who Are You?" Not only are private businesses inordinately nosy when it comes to asking for irrelevant information, now the Supreme Court continues its quest to erase your ability to exercise your right to anonymity.
"Your Friendly, Neighborhood Bankerman." Bankers are ready agents of a State determined to eliminate all forms of privacy and anonymity.
"Your Papers, Please." Renewed calls for mandatory national ID cards in the name of safety will only achieve the opposite.
 
Property Rights
 
"'It's Only Money...'" The money you earn represents part of your life. Respecting one requires respecting the other.
"Dollars and Non-Sense." Apparently the editors of The TV Guide accept the lie that it only makes "sense" that rich people can only justify their wealth by giving it away to those who did not earn it.
"The Miracle of Voting." Say the magic words, "We voted for this," and the impossible becomes reality...at least in the minds of too many Americans.
"Pride in Property." The idea and reality of "property" should be celebrated, not ridiculed.
"Sacred Ground." Some people claim that the WTC site should remain a memorial, with no construction or commerce allowed there, because it is "sacred ground." Unfortunately, such people do not understand what truly makes a plot of land sacred.
"Taking the Fifth." Eminent domain and "takings" take more than your property...they take your freedom, too.
"Zoned Out." Local tyranny is often most easily seen in the subjective enforcement of zoning laws.
 
Ayn Rand and Objectivism
 
"American Fascism Revisited." A reexamination of Ayn Rand's1962 speech, "The Fascist New Frontier," and its application to present-day society.
"Ayn Rand: Philosopher for a New Millennium?" Rand's place in history and the future.
"Free Will vs Determinism." A brief consideration of contradictions inherent in accepting determinism and rejecting free will.
"Fuel For the Soul." An analysis of Rand's main goal in writing her classic novel, Atlas Shrugged. [NB: This is the shorter, 4100 word version of the essay that is to appear in Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged: A Philosophical and Literary Companion edited by Edward Younkins (Ashgate Publishers, 2006). For the uncut, 5700 word version, go here.]
"Heroes and Cowards." Ayn Rand exemplied heroism. Hers is an example to be emulated.
"Introduction to Objectivism." A brief summary of some major foundations.
"Objectivism and Business." A review of Ayn Rand and Business by Donna Greiner and Theodore Kinni. Objectivist guidelines for conducting one's business. (Published as "Ayn Rand and Business.")
"The Persuasive Art." A review of Ayn Rand's The Art of Nonfiction.
"Rand on War." What Ayn Rand said about war, in general, and Vietnam, in particular, echoes eerily with present-day concerns.
"Re: 'The Generation of Life." A critique of Laura Rift's discussion of reproduction vs production.
"Re: 'Rationality as a Source of Conflicts of Interest.'" A critique of Murray Franck's evaluation of Rand's essay, "The 'Conflicts' of Men's Interests."
"The Right vs the Left: A = A." The equality of Statists.
A Second Letter to Full Context re: Murray Franck's Essay on "'Conflicts' of Interests"
"Remembering Rand." A review of Facets of Ayn Rand: Memoirs by Mary Ann and Charles Sures. When certain facets are ignored... (Published as "Facets of Ayn Rand: Whitewashing by the Ayn Rand Institute.")
"The Skeptic." The incoherence of skepticism.
"The Truth About Writing." A review of Ayn Rand's The Art of Fiction: A Guide to Writers and Readers. (Published as, "The Art of Fiction.")
"Values and Virtues: Von Mises and Rand." Ayn Rand sought to rescue the concepts of "selfishness" and "sacrifice" and "rights" from the statists and the collectivists, from the mystics and the altruists. The concept "values" has also been debased by the inclusion of goals, objects, and actions that are inimical to life. Any such desires that undermine life should be understood and labeled for what they are: destruction.
 
Responsibility
 
"The Evil I." A look at the nature of evil and whether it even exists.
"Getting to the Bottom." A hike to the bottom of the Grand Canyon reveals important lessons we, as a society, would do well to learn if we value freedom.
"Give Us Some Credit." The Feds go after Visa and Mastercard; better they let us make our own decisions.
"I Am Not Responsible." Politicians proclaim that none of us is responsible when we should be, yet we are supposed to be fully responsible in areas where control belongs to others.
"Rejecting Responsibility," When -- and when not to -- accept responsibility.
"Watering the Tree." Despite the natural tendency to protect the weak and helpless, sometimes the best we can do for them is to leave them alone.
"Wealth and Responsibility." Those who feel guilty about their own wealth and advocate force to impose their views on others understand neither wealth nor responsibility.
 
Rights
 
"Disabled Thinking." Rights are of no concern to those who believe that disabled people have special rights. (Published as "ADA's Disabled Thinking.")
"Getting Rights Right." By examining the origins and foundations necessary for the existence and exercise of full adult rights, we can better understand how the concept of "rights" applies to children.
A Letter to George H. Smith re: Capital Punishment and Inalienable Rights.
A Letter to R. W. Bradford re: Rights and the Non-coercion Principle.
A Letter to Rush Limbaugh re: The Nature of Rights.
"Medical Wrongs...and Rights." Is health care a right?
"My Life: A Comic Adventure." The two most powerful -- and misunderstood -- words in human thought are "my life," as in, "My life belongs to me," and all that such a claim implies.
"The Myth of Animal Rights." Animals have no free will, no use for morality, and, hence, no rights.
"No-Brainer." The ends never justify the means...not even with PBS.
"Punishing the Many." When those who have done no wrong have their freedom curtailed because of the misdeeds of others.
"Pushing the Peanut." An effort to establish legal rights for a chimp is yet another example of statist incrementalism and a direct assault on the very meaning of rights.
"The Right to Discriminate." People have the right peacefully to discriminate against -- or for -- anyone for anyone reason.
"Taking Freedom Personally." Few people get upset as their freedom is robbed from them day-by-by. Passion is conspicuously absent in a realm that should be intensely personal.
"Taking Rights." Is it possible for peaceful individuals ever to have their fundamental rights "taken away" from them?
 
Safety
 
"In Praise of Violence." Violence can be either good or bad. Forget the difference at your peril.
"Risky Business." Appeals to omniscience and the "precautionary principle" lead to more risks.
"Safety Uber Alles." Seat belts for everyone at the point of a gun do not make us safer.
"Saving Lives." When cops on PSA's tell us they're giving us seat belt violation tickets in order to "save lives" maybe we should be grateful...or not.
 
Science
 
"The Certainty of Uncertainty." An Objectivist look at quantum theory.
"The Resurrection of Lysenko." Lysenkoism in modern science; when politics trumps the truth.
 
Self-Defense and Guns
 
"America, East." U.S. efforts to disarm Iraqi citizens eerily echo the actions of the State here in America, West. (Published as "Gun Control in America East.")
"Are Objectivists Afraid of Guns?" Why do Objectivists so rarely address Second Amendment issues?
"Calling the NRA." Asking for what you think you can get rather than for what you think is right betrays both your self and your values.
"End the U.N." The United Nations wants to burn your guns...and your rights, as well. (Published as "Abolish the United Nations.")
"The Evil Freedom Culture." Attacking the "gun culture" is, at heart, a repudiation of the freedom upon which our right to self-defense depends.
"Gun Control Cyclops." Anti-self-defense advocates "see" only with the eye of emotion. They are blind to facts and reality.
"If Guns Could Kill." Are guns -- or their owners -- the source of violence?
A Letter to E. G. Ross on the compatibility of self-defense and a government monopoly on force.
"The Myth of Gun Violence." The mantra against "gun violence" blurs important differences in morality.
"Paint It Black." Understanding principles is the key to recognizing how the State systematically violates our rights. Paintball, pilots, and play guns share a common denominator.
"'Rights' In the Heartland." The Heartland is hardly a model of freedom to be emulated. Attitudes there towards self-defense starkly reveal how poorly rights are understood. (Published as "Self-Defense in the Heartland.")
"Second to None." Anti-self-defense groups are aghast at the notion that someone might want to respect the Second Amendment as much as the First.
"Self-Defense and Property Rights." Three men fired by AOL take aim at the anti-gun company. (Published as "The Gun Pointed at AOL.")
"The War on Self-Defense." A Michigan case reveals the absurd logic of those opposed to self-defense.
"When a Gun Is Not a Gun." When airport security screeners treat candy and toys as weapons, their conceptual confusion poses a threat to both our freedom and our lives.
"You Should Be Thankful." Using the worst rather than the best for your standard does not help freedom. (Published as "Don't Thank the NRA.")
 
Smoking
 
"Defending Joe." Who is responsible for smoking?
"Inmates Running the Asylum." A mother must choose between smoking and visitations from her son. A case of children dictating to their parents.
"Smoking (Out) Fascists." Laws to ban smoking in so-called public businesses is fascism in disguise.
 
Taxes
 
"Bad Economy." In the inverted world of statism, the major evidence of a bad economy is when government programs are cut. (Published as "Bad Economy Good.")
"Costing the Government." Tax cuts "cost" the government nothing and can never be "too expensive." (Published as "Eat the Government.")
"In the Arms of the State." Should people be forced to die in prison for keeping what is morally -- if not legally -- theirs, i.e., their own money? What should we do when the rule of law conflicts with what is right?
"Option Tax Opposition." A short letter demonstrating the evil of democratically imposed theft.
"Taxypayers' Rights." While the sentiments of tax reformers may be good, these activists do not really understand the principles involved nor the contradictions of that which they seek.
 
Terrorists and Terrorism
 
"Attacking Freedom." September 11, 2001, will not soon be forgotten: the day terrorism gripped America and destroyed the World Trade Center.
"Constitutional Suicide." Those statists who spout the slogan, "The Constitution is not a suicide pact," are out to destroy what stands in their way.
"'Dangerous' Knives." Hysteria over unconfiscated knives on planes hides the reality that stealing citizens' means of self-defense does not make them safer.
"The Limits of Tragedy." Some of the relatives of the 9-11-01 attacks have crossed the line from accepting charity to violating rights.
"The New Boogeymen." The State exaggerates the extent of "terrorist threats" as an excuse for stealing our freedom. They refuse to consider the one solution that would actually increase our security.
"The One True Religion." On the anniversary of the World Trade Center attacks, it's clear that the real culprit was not Islam or any particular religion. The true source of our problems goes much deeper and is far more widespread that any such narrow concerns.
"Race For Freedom." In the wake of the World Trade Center attack, we face a race between freedom and growing dictatorship.
"Taliban 'R' Us." The Taliban provide an eerie reflection of ideas and principles commonly held by American citizens.
"True Terrorists." Who better exhibits the characteristics of terrorists: common criminals or the State? (Published as "The Real Terrorists.")
"When a Gun Is Not a Gun." When airport security screeners treat candy and toys as weapons, their conceptual confusion poses a threat to both our freedom and our lives.
 
Voting
 
"The Marching Morons." When stupidity is celebrated and used as a weapon against the rest of us. (Published as "Florida and the Marching Morons.")
"Voting Fraud." A gubernatorial recall and the introduction of electronic voting have some people concerned. Too bad they totally ignore the real fraud that plagues voting.
 
War (Iraqi War, War in General)
 
"Avenging Angels." Many supporters of war view themselves as righteous warriors out to combat the evils of the world...and eager to force the rest of us along regardless of our own desires. (Published as "Avenging Angels of Western Civilization: Paroxysms and Orgasms of War.")
"The Corruption of Self-Interest." Those who justify actions of the State in war and domestically by an appeal to "self-interest" carefully avoid the proper qualifier: rational self-interest.
"Eager For War." Those pushing for war with Iraq have lots of reasons...too bad none of them are good.
"A Good Defense." The president insists that a threat that "may" develop at some hazy time in the future justifies an immediate attack. What might happen if lovers of liberty took him at his word?
"Good Wars: The Self-Fulfilling Prophecies of Statists." Every war is seen as "good" by some people. How many actually were justified is another question altogether.
"I Don't Get It." The White House Gang told us they knew where the Iraqis were hiding their WMD's. Too bad we can't find them now... (Published as "What Happened to the Weapons of Mass Destruction? I Don't Get It.")
"Learning From the Past." Maybe we should treat our enemies as did Lincoln and FDR and the rest. Or maybe not. (Published as"Learning From Past Wars.")
"Rand on War." What Ayn Rand said about war, in general, and Vietnam, in particular, echoes eerily with present-day concerns.
"Self-Defense: Preemptive, Immediate, and Retaliatory." Those who blur the fundamental difference between self-defense and aggression are guided by a goal other than freedom.
"Unleashing the Dogs." The warped idea that we should attack someone because he "might" pose a threat sets the United States on a collision course with half the world. (Published as "Iraq: Unleashing the Dogs.")
"'We' Speaks." The Prez gives a speech on the war in Iraq. But no matter how many times he says "we," he does not speak for me. (Published as "Onward Presidential Minions: 'We' Speaks.")
 
F. Paul Wilson Reviews and Interview
 
"Crossing Jack." In the new Repairman Jack novel, Crisscross, by F. Paul Wilson, Jack's "fix-its" entwine in ways that test the core of his being.
"Gateways to Hidden Worlds" A review of Gateways by F. Paul Wilson. Repairman Jack journeys to the Everglades and becomes acquainted with a stranger: his dad. (Original title: "Gateways: A Review.")
"The Haunted Air." A review of The Haunted Air by F. Paul Wilson. Repairman Jack tackles the irrational and risks all he holds dear.
Implant by F. Paul Wilson, A Review. (Short Version). Medicine versus freedom. Long version (w/ commentary on health care.)
"Infernal Wisdom." A review of F. Paul Wilson's, Infernal, a Repairman Jack novel. Jack and his brother, Tom, meet, at last...much to Jack's dismay.
Interview with libertarian author F. Paul Wilson.
"Jack of All Trades." A review of All the Rage by F. Paul Wilson. Repairman Jack faces more than one kind of demon...
"The Measure of a Man." A review of Sims by F. Paul Wilson. Genetically-modified worker apes make life easier for those who lease them. But are these creatures "property"...or persons?
"Of Parasites and Hosts." A review of Hosts by F. Paul Wilson. Repairman Jack meets his sister.
"Repairman Job." In Harbingers, Repariman Jack echoes the suffering of the Biblical Job as he struggles to survive the relentless attention of the Adversary and the Ally.
 
 


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