Quintus-ential Solutions


Network and Geospatial Analysis in the Health Sciences


With emphasis on social network analysis and public health information systems management, I assist in data conversion, analysis, visualization, presentation and publication.


I help with study methodologies, data collection, hardware and software with emphasis on network analysis and visualization, especially of large datasets.

I can help with scientific and grant writing, presentation, layout, self-publishing, and website design.



  • Social Network Analysis - how network structure and individual behaviors interact

  • Information Systems Design - efficient collection, storage, retrieval, and backup to maximize operations

  • Data management - efficient cleanup and record unduplication methods

  • Statistical Analysis - finding patterns in collected data

  • GIS / Spatial Analysis - data collection and analysis methods to take advantage of location, road distance

  • Publication Graphics - worth a thousand words

  • Multimedia Production - Powerpoint, DVD authoring

Network Analysis and Visualization


Here are examples of visualizations of network datasets I have worked on over the years. Many are from datasets I compiled for the HIV Transmission Network Metastudy Project. Descriptions of and access to these data can be found at the referenced link (or at the National Addiction & HIV Data Archive Program [NAHDAP]), along with a list of relevant publications.


Page under construction - check back for updates of this list of extant datasets I have worked on.

CDC Project 90, "The Colorado Springs Study" (1988-1992). The first network study of HIV transmission in heterosexuals focused on recruiting those reporting highest risk behaviors: prostitution, IV drug use (IDU), or sexual contact with the same. Spread outside IDU was not detected, despite 5-years of purposive snowball sampling. Not even a single sexually-spread case of HIV was detected, despite numerous unprotected sexual connections to HIV-positive persons demonstrated by the highly-clustered network data.

Project 90, largest component (N=6475, all connections)

Project 90, remaining 118 components (N=1495, all connections)

The SFHR network, the second study major HIV network study was collected by Sam Friedman and Don DesJarlais's group at NDRI, in New York City. The cohort consisted mainly of IDU in "shooting gallery" settings in Bushwick, Brooklyn. The resulting network exhibited HIV at its heart, which explained high incidence, unlike the Colorado Springs network with its low incidence and HIV in the periphery.

Bushwick, largest component

Bushwick, 313 smaller components

The Colorado Springs HIV network (1985-2000) shows what develops from fifteen years of routine contact investigations. Conscientious follow-up to every identified case of HIV over this time period revealed very little sustained transmission, and the local outbreaks of disease (as well as the case burden nationally) imploded as predicted. To this day, overall risk factor patterns for the newly-infected in the USA mirror that of the situation thirty years ago.

The largest component of 324 cases and sex/needle contacts

The remaining 309 components, compromising 2027 individuals

The "GC 1981" dataset resulted in John Potterat's seminal paper "Gonorrhea as a Social Disease", providing a rich example of how the majority of a community's disease burden can be caused by a relatively small core group. Half the cases came from only four (out of 68) census tracts, and half of the citations of bars involved only 6 places (out of more than 300 possible).

The largest component

The remaining components, showing the highly fragmented nature of connections outside the core

The gang PPNG network (1990-1991) illuminated the social structure of the Colorado Springs gang scene, recently imported mostly from Los Angeles & St. Louis. The sex-for-crack nature of their environments made for an explosive outbreak of drug-resistant gonorrhea.

The largest component (N=584 in this example), demonstrates extraordinary cyclicity and is extremely difficult to visualize.

"Step reduction" (removing terminii) can help reveal the underlying structure of this core network.





Projects with Direct Analytical Involvement





Stephen Muth's Publications

Skip to chapters / commentaries / letters

IN PREPARATION:

  • McKeon KL, Muth SQ, Schmidt N, Kissinger P. Comparing Sexual Networks of Drug Using and Non-Drug Using Latino Migrant Men. To: The Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
  • Al-Tayyib A, Muth SQ. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in Social Networks of Youth and Young Adults who Misuse Prescription Opioids and Heroin. (for Field Methods)

ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTIONS (in reverse chronological order):

  1. Meghan D. Althoff MD, Theall K, Schmidt N, Hembling J, Gebrekristos HT, MM Thompson, Muth SQ, Friedman SR, Kissinger P. Social Support Networks and HIV/STI Risk Behaviors Among Latino Immigrants in a New Receiving Environment. AIDS and Behavior 2017 Dec 21; (12):3607–3617. First Online 21 July. ISSN: 1090-7165 (Print) 1573-3254 (Online). [abstract]
  2. Nikolopoulos GK, Pavlitina E, Muth SQ, Schneider J, Psichogiou M, Williams LD, Paraskevis D, Sypsa V, Magiorkinis G, Smyrnov P, Korobchuk A, Vasylyeva TI, Skaathun B, Malliori M, Kafetzopoulos E, Hatzakis A, Friedman SR. A network intervention that locates and intervenes with recently HIV-infected persons: The Transmission Reduction Intervention Project (TRIP). Scientific Reports (Nature) 2016 (6) 38100; doi: 10.1038/srep38100. [fulltext]
  3. Birkett M, Kuhns LM, Latkin C, Muth SQ, Mustanski BS. The Sexual Networks of Racially Diverse Young Men Who Have Sex with Men. Archives of Sexual Behavior 2015 Oct; 44(7):1787–1797. (2015 July 23 Epub ahead of print). [abstract] [fulltext, unedited]
  4. Kuhns LM, Birkett M, Muth SQ, Latkin C, Ortiz-Estes I, Garofalo R, Mustanski BS. Methods for Collection of Participant-aided Sociograms for the Study of Social, Sexual and Substance-using Networks among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men. Connections 2015 June, Issue 1, Vol. 35. [DOI] [fulltext]
  5. Brewer DD, Muth SQ, Dudek JA, Potterat JJ, Roberts JM. Geographic Profiles of Violent Clients of Prostitute Women and Clients Overall. Social Science Research Network 26 December 2014. [abstract] [PDF]
  6. (Presented at the 8th Annual Crime Mapping Research Conference, Savannah, 7–10 Sep 2005.)
  7. Brewer DD, Muth SQ, Roberts JM, Potterat JJ. Reliability of Reported Sexual Partnership Dates and Measures of Concurrency Social Science Research Network 26 December 2014. [abstract] [PDF]
  8. (Presented at the Workshop on the Current Chlamydia Epidemic in Western Societies, Stockholm, 30–31 Aug 2007.)
  9. Mustanski B, Birkett M, Kuhns LM, Latkin CA, Muth SQ. The role of geographic and network factors in racial disparities in HIV among young men who have sex with men: an egocentric network study. AIDS and Behavior June 2015; 19(6):1037–1047 (online 2014 Nov 28). [abstract]
  10. Shah NS, Iveniuk J, Muth SQ, Michaels S, Jose J, Laumann EO, Schneider JA. Structural bridging network position is associated with HIV status in a younger Black men who have sex with men epidemic. AIDS and Behavior Feb 2014; 18(2):335–345.
  11. Yang C, Latkin C, Muth SQ, Rudolph A. Injection Drug Users' Involvement In Drug Economy: Dynamics of Sociometric and Egocentric Social Networks. Connections July 2013; 33(1):24–34. [PDF]
  12. (presented as Latkin CA, Yang C, Kuramoto S & Muth SQ. HIV Risk Network Composition and Sociometric Measure among Active Injection Drug Users. XXIX International Sunbelt Social Network Conference, San Diego 2009.)
  13. Chew Ng RA, Muth SQ, Auerswald CL. Impact of social network characteristics on shelter use among street youth in San Francisco. Journal of Adolescent Health September 2013; 53(3):381–386. [fulltext, unedited] [abstract]
  14. Doherty IA, Serre ML, Gesink D, Adimora AA, Muth SQ, Leone PA, Miller WC. Sexual networks, surveillance, and geographical space during syphilis outbreaks in rural North Carolina. Epidemiology November 2012; 23(6):845–851. [abstract] [fulltext, unedited]
  15. (presented as posters: Doherty IA, Muth SQ, Fitch MK, Gesink Law DC, Allshouse WB, Serre ML, Leone PA, Miller WC. Geographical Trends of Compactness and Directional Bias of Sexual Networks in North Carolina during an Outbreak. and Doherty IA, Muth SQ, Adimora AA, Gesink Law DC, Fitch MK, Hampton KH, Allshouse WB, Leone PA, Serre ML, Miller WC. Where Was the Outbreak? Use of Number of Cases, Incidence Rates, and Sexual Networks to Assess a Syphilis Outbreak in North Carolina. 18th International Society for Sexually Transmitted Diseases Research Conference, London UK, 1 July 2009.)
  16. Comulada WS, Muth SQ, Latkin CA. The analysis of multiple ties in longitudinal egocentric network data: A case study on bidirectional relationships between trust and drug use. Social Networks 2012; 34(4):691–700. [abstract]
  17. Moody James, adams j, Muth SQ, and Morris M. Quantifying the benefits of link-tracing designs for partnership network studies. Field Methods 2012 May 1; 24(2):175–193.
  18. Doherty IA, Adimora AA, Muth SQ, Serre ML, Leone PA, Miller WC. Comparison of sexual mixing patterns for syphilis in endemic and outbreak settings. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2011 May; 38(5):378–84.
  19. (presented as a talk: Leone PA, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Jones CS, Aral SO, St. Lawrence JS, Hilton MJ. Network Visualization and Ethnography Characterize North Carolina Syphilis Outbreaks as Heterosexually-Driven. International Society for Sexually Transmitted Disease Research; 2003 ISSTDR Congress, Ottawa Canada Jul 2003; Abstr. 0500. And as a poster: Doherty IA, Muth SQ, Adimora AA, Fitch MK, Tarman JS, Hampton KH, Gesink Law DC, Allshouse WB, Serre ML, Leone PA, Miller WC. Sexual Mixing Patterns by Geography, Race/Ethnicity, Age, and Sexual Activity During a Heterosexual Syphilis Outbreak in North Carolina. 18th International Society for Sexually Transmitted Diseases Research Conference, London UK, 1 July 2009.)
  20. Fichtenberg CM, Muth SQ, Brown B, Padian NS, Glass TA, Ellen JM. Sexual network position and risk of sexually transmitted infections. Sexually Transmitted Infections Dec 2009; 85:493–498.
  21. Gisselquist D, Potterat JJ, St. Lawrence JS, Hogan M, Arora NK, Correa M, Dinsmore W, Mehta G, Millogo J, Muth SQ, Okinyi M, Ounga T. How to contain generalized HIV epidemics? A plea for better evidence to displace speculation. International Journal of STD & AIDS, July 2009; 20(7):443–446. [Abstract] [FullText] [PDF]
  22. Fichtenberg CM, Muth SQ, Brown B, Padian NS, Glass TA, Ellen JM. The structure of African American adolescent sexual networks in an endemic sexually transmitted infection setting. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Jan 2009; 36(1):41–48. [Abstract] [HTML] [PDF]
  23. (editorialized in the same issue by: Potterat JJ. Sexual network configuration of sexually transmitted diseases hyperendemicity as harbinger of epidemicity. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2009 Jan; 36(1):49–50.)
  24. Brewer DD, Roberts JM Jr, Muth SQ, Potterat JJ. Prevalence of male clients of prostitute women in the United States. Human Organization Sept 2008; 67(3):346–356. [Abstract]
  25. (presented as: Prevalence of Clients of Prostitute Women in North America. The 2004 American Society of Criminology Conference, Cincinnati, November 2004; 25th International Sunbelt Social Networks Conference, Redondo Beach CA, Feb 2005.)
  26. Brewer DD, Muth SQ, Potterat JJ. Demographic, Biometric, and Geographic Comparison of Clients of Prostitutes and Men in the US General Population. Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality 2008 June 9; (11). [fulltext]
  27. Cook VJ, Sun SJ, Tapia J, Muth SQ, Arguello DF, Lewis BL, Rothenberg RB, McElroy PD, and the Network Analysis Project Team. Transmission Network Analysis in Tuberculosis Contact Investigations. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2007 Nov 15; 196(10):1517–1527. Epub 2007 Oct 31. [Abstract] [fulltext] [PDF]
  28. Rothenberg R, Muth SQ. Large network concepts and small network characteristics: fixed and variable factors. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2007; 34(8):604–612. [abstract] [fulltext] [PDF].
  29. (presented at the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications symposium “Networks and the Population Dynamics of Disease Transmission”, University of Minnesota, 19 Nov 2003)
  30. Rothenberg RB, Dan My Hoang T, Muth SQ, Crosby R. The Atlanta Urban Adolescent network study: a network view of STD prevalence. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2007; 34(8):525–531. Appearing ahead of print as 10.1097/01.olq.0000258132.06764.a1. [abstract] [fulltext] [PDF].
  31. Seña, AC, Muth SQ, Heffelfinger JD, O’Dowd JO, Foust E, Leone P. Factors and the Sociosexual Network Associated With a Syphilis Outbreak in Rural North Carolina. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2007; 34(1). Appearing ahead of print: POST COPYEDIT, 29 November 2006, 10.1097/01.olq.0000237776.15870.c3.[abstract]
  32. (presented at the XXIII International Sunbelt Social Network Conference, Quintana Roo, Mexico Feb 2003 Feb Abstract 98 as "Networks analysis reveals genesis of syphilis outbreak in North Carolina".)
  33. Niccolai LM, Stephens N, Jenkins H, Richardson W, Muth SQ, Rothenberg R. Infectious Syphilis Among Men in Connecticut: Epidemiologic and Spatial Patterns. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2007. Appearing ahead of print: POST COPYEDIT, 10 August 2006, 10.1097/01.olq.0000233708.27225.90. [abstract]
  34. (presented at the National STD Prevention Conference, Jacksonville FL, May 10 2006; [abstract 307])
  35. Brewer DD, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Roberts JM Jr. A large specific deterrent effect of arrest for patronizing a prostitute. Public Library of Science ONE 2006; 1(1): e60. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000060.[abstract] [PDF] [XML]
  36. (presented at The 2004 American Society of Criminology Conference, Cincinnati, November 2004.)
  37. Brewer DD, Dudek JA, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Woodhouse DE. Extent, trends, and perpetrators of prostitution-related homicide. Journal of Forensic Science, 2006; 51(5):1101–1108. [abstract]
  38. (presented at the U.S. Annual Meeting of the Homicide Research Working Group, Ann Arbor MI, June 2004.
  39. Brewer DD, Hagan H, Sullivan DG, Muth SQ, Hough ES, Gretch DR. Social structural and behavioral underpinnings of hyperendemic HCV transmission in drug injectors. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2006; 194(6):764–772. [abstract]
  40. (presented at the XXV International Sunbelt Social Networks Conference, Redondo Beach CA, February 2005; the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute Brown Bag Seminar, University of Washington, 14 June 2005, and at the Epidemiology Brown Bag Seminar, HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Program, Public Health-Seattle & King County, 12 July 2005.)
  41. Auerswald CL, Muth SQ, Brown B, Padian N, Ellen J. Does partner selection contribute to sex differences in Sexually Transmitted Infection Rates Among African American Adolescents in San Francisco? Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2006; 33(8):480–484. [abstract]
  42. (presented at the XXV International Sunbelt Social Networks Conference, Redondo Beach CA, February 2005.)
  43. Brewer DD, Rothenberg RB, Muth SQ, Roberts JM Jr, Potterat JJ. Agreement in reported sexual partnership dates and implications for measuring concurrency. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2006; 33(5):277–283. [abstract]
  44. Rothenberg RB, Muth SQ, Malone S, Potterat JJ, Woodhouse DE. Social and Geographic Distance in HIV Risk. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2005; 32(8):506–512. [abstract]
  45. (presented, in part, at the 5th European and XVIII International Sunbelt Social Networks Conference, Sitges Spain, May 1998.)
  46. Ellen JM, Brown BA, Chung S, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Valente TW, Padian NS. Impact of sexual networks on risk for gonorrhea and chlamydia among low-income urban African American adolescents. The Journal of Pediatrics 2005; 146:518–522. [abstract]
  47. (presented at the ISSTDR Conference, Ottawa Canada, July 2003. Abstract 0039. [PDF – pg. 25, bottom]
  48. Brewer DD, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Malone PZ, Montoya PA, Green DA, Rogers HL, Cox PA. Randomized trial of supplementary interviewing techniques to enhance recall of sexual partners in contact interviews. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2005; 32(3):189–193. [abstract]
  49. (presented partially at the 126th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association, Washington DC, November 1998, the XXII International Sunbelt Social Network Conference, New Orleans, February 2002, and at the XXIV International Sunbelt Social Network Conference, Portoroz Slovenia, May 2004.)
  50. Brody S, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Woodhouse DE. Psychiatric and characterological factors relevant to excess mortality in a long-term cohort of prostitute women. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy 2005; 31(2):97–112. [abstract]
  51. Potterat JJ, Brewer DD, Muth SQ, Rothenberg RB, Woodhouse DE, Muth JB, Stites HK, Brody S. Mortality in a long-term open cohort of prostitute women. American Journal of Epidemiology 2004; 159(8):778–785. [abstract] [fulltext] [PDF]
  52. Rothenberg RB, McElroy PD, Wilce M, and Muth SQ. Contact tracing: comparing the approaches for Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Tuberculosis. International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 2003 Dec; 7(12):S342–S348. [abstract] [PDF]
  53. McElroy PD, Rothenberg RB, Varghese R, Woodruff R, Minns G, Lambert LA, Muth SQ, Ridzon R. A Network-Informed Approach to Investigating a Tuberculosis Outbreak: Implications for Enhancing Contact Investigations. International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 2003 Dec; 7(12 Suppl 3):S486–93. [abstract]
  54. (nominated for the 2004 Charles C. Shepard Science Award, Laboratory and Methods category [DOC - pg10])
  55. Auerswald CL; Brown B; Muth SQ; Padian N; Ellen J. Older male partners, high rates of incarceration and marginal economic activities in the sexual networks of a random digit dial sample of 14–19 year old economically disadvantaged African American youth. Journal of Adolescent Health 2003 Feb; 32(2):155. [abstract] [fulltext] [PDF]
  56. Potterat JJ, Phillips-Plummer L, Muth SQ, Rothenberg RB, Woodhouse DE, Maldonado-Long TS, Zimmerman HP, Muth JB. Risk network structure in the early epidemic phase of HIV transmission in Colorado Springs. Sexually Transmitted Infections 2002; 78(Suppl I):i159–i163. [abstract] [fulltext] [PDF]
  57. (presented, in part, at the "Phase-specific Strategies for the Prevention, Control and Elimination of Sexually Transmitted Diseases" Conference, Rome, Italy, 5 October 2000.)
  58. Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Rothenberg, RB, Zimmerman-Rogers H, Green DL, Taylor JE, Bonney MS, White HAl. Sexual network structure as an indicator of epidemic phase. Sexually Transmitted Infections 2002; 78(Suppl I):i152–i158. [abstract] [fulltext] [PDF]
  59. (presented at the "Phase-specific Strategies for the Prevention, Control and Elimination of Sexually Transmitted Diseases" Conference, Rome Italy, 5 October 2000.)
  60. Brewer D, Potterat JJ, Garrett SB, Muth SQ, Roberts JM, Kasprzyk D, Montano DE, Darrow WW. Prostitution and the sex discrepancy in reported number of sexual partners. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 2000; 97:12385–12388. [abstract] [fulltext] [PDF]
  61. (presented at the XIXth International Social Networks Conference, Charleston SC, Feb 1999)
  62. Rothenberg RB, Sterk C, Long D, Pach A, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ. The Atlanta urban networks study: I. A blueprint for endemic transmission. AIDS 2000; 14:2191–2201. [abstract]
  63. Muth SQ, Potterat JJ, Rothenberg RB. Birds of a feather: assessing sample bias using geographic information systems. The International Journal of Epidemiology 2000; 29:899–904. [fulltext]
  64. (presented, in part, at the 5th European and XVIIIth Sunbelt Conference on Social Networks, Sitges, Spain, May 1998.)
  65. Rothenberg R, Wasserheit JN, St.Louis ME and the Ad Hoc STD/HIV Transmission Group. The effect of treating STDs on the transmission of HIV in dually-infected persons: a clinic-based estimate. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2000; 27:411–416. [abstract]
  66. (presented at the 12th World AIDS Conference, Geneva, Switzerland, June 1998, Abstract No. 23369.)
  67. Potterat JJ, Zimmerman-Rogers H, Muth SQ, Rothenberg RB, Green DL, Taylor JE, Bonney MS, White HA. Chlamydial transmission: concurrency, reproductive ratio and the epidemic trajectory. The American Journal of Epidemiology 1999; 150:1331–1339. [abstract] [fulltext]
  68. Potterat JJ, Rothenberg RB, Muth JB, Woodhouse DE, Muth SQ. Invoking, monitoring and relinquishing a public health police power: the Health Hold Order. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 1999; 26:345–349. [abstract]
  69. (Editorialized in the same issue as, The role of the police power in 21st century public health, pp. 350–357.)
  70. Zimmerman-Rogers H, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Bonney MS, Green DL, Taylor JE, White HA. Establishing efficient partner notification periods for chlamydia patients. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 1999; 26:49–54. [abstract]
  71. (Presented at 12th International Society for STD Research Conference, Seville, Spain, 22 October 1997; Abstract # 775.)
  72. Darrow WW, Potterat JJ, Rothenberg RB, Woodhouse DE, Muth SQ, Klovdahl AS. Using knowledge of social networks to prevent human immunodeficiency virus infections: the Colorado Springs study. Sociological Focus 1999; 32:143–158. [abstract]
  73. (presented at the 1995 Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, 20 August 1995, Washington DC)
  74. Potterat JJ, Rothenberg R, Muth S. Network structural dynamics and infectious disease propagation. The International Journal of STD & AIDS 1999; 10:182–185. [abstract]
  75. (presented at the 2nd European Conference on Methods and Results of Social and Behavioral Research on AIDS, Paris, France, 14 January 1998: Abstract SY 6.4; and at the Measurement of Risk and Modeling of AIDS Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark, 3 June 1998)
  76. Potterat JJ, Rothenberg RB, Muth SQ, Darrow WW, Phillips-Plummer L. Pathways to prostitution: the chronology of sexual and drug abuse milestones. The Journal of Sex Research 1998; 35(4):333–340. [fulltext]
  77. (presented at the IX International Conference on AIDS/IV STD World Congress, Berlin, Germany, June 1993 [Abstract # WS-CO8-5])
  78. Rothenberg RB, Potterat JJ, Woodhouse DE, Muth SQ, Darrow WW, Klovdahl A. Social network dynamics and HIV transmission. AIDS 1998; 12:1529–1536. [abstract]
  79. (presented at the National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, 10 July 1995, Washington DC; at the 1995 Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association, San Diego [California], October 1995; and at the XVI International Sunbelt Social Networks Conference, Charleston SC, February 1996)
  80. Brace NE, Zimmerman HP, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Muth JB, Maldonado TS, Rothenberg RB. Community-based HIV prevention in presumably underserved populations—Colorado Springs, Colorado, July–September 1995. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 1997; 46:152–155. [fulltext]
  81. (Reprinted in the Journal of the American Medical Association 1997; 277:876–877.)
  82. Rothenberg RB, Potterat JJ, Woodhouse DE, Darrow WW, Muth SQ, Klovdahl AS. Choosing a centrality measure: epidemiologic correlates in the Colorado Springs study of social networks. Social Networks 1995; 17:273–297. [abstract]
  83. (presented at the XIV International Sunbelt Social Networks Conference, New Orleans [Louisiana], 18 February 1994.)
  84. Woodhouse DE, Rothenberg RB, Potterat JJ, Darrow WW, Muth SQ, Klovdahl AS, Zimmerman HP, Rogers, HL, Maldonado TS, Muth JB, Reynolds JU. Mapping a social network of heterosexuals at high risk of human immunodeficiency virus infection. AIDS 1994; 8:1331–1336. [abstract]
  85. (presented, in part, at the VI International Conference on AIDS, 23 June 1990, San Francisco [California]: Abstract # S.C. 679; also at the VII International Conference on AIDS, 19 June 1991, Florence, Italy: Abstract # W.C. 100; and at the VIII International Conference on AIDS/III STD World Congress, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, July 1992: Abstract ThC 1519.)
  86. Klovdahl AS, Potterat J, Woodhouse D, Muth J, Muth S, Darrow WW. Social networks and infectious disease: The Colorado Springs study. Social Science and Medicine 1994; 38:79–88. [abstract]
  87. (presented at the VI International Conference on AIDS, June 1990, San Francisco [California]: Poster SC 679; and at the XII International Social Networks Conference, San Diego [California], February 1992.)
  88. Potterat JJ, Woodhouse DE, Rothenberg RB, Muth SQ, Darrow WW, Muth JB, Reynolds JU. AIDS in Colorado Springs: Is there an epidemic? AIDS 1993; 7:1517–1521. [abstract]
  89. Bethea RP, Muth SQ, Potterat JJ, Woodhouse DE, Muth JB, Spencer NE, Hoffman RE. Gang-related outbreak of Penicillinase-Producing Neisseria Gonorrhoeae and other sexually transmitted diseases—Colorado Springs, 1989–1991. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 1993; 42(2):25–28. [fulltext]
  90. (Reprinted in the Journal of the American Medical Association 1993; 269:1092,1094. Presented at the VIII International Conference on AIDS/III STD World Congress, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, July 1992: Abstract ThC 1516.)
  91. Klovdahl AS, Potterat J, Woodhouse D, Muth J, Muth S, Darrow WW. HIV infection in an urban social network: a progress report. Bulletin De Méthodologie Sociologique 1992; 36:24–33.
  92. (presented by AS Klovdahl at the XI International Sunbelt Social Network Conference, Tampa Florida, February, 1991)
  93. Potterat JJ, Woodhouse DE, Muth JB, Muth SQ. Estimating the prevalence and career longevity of prostitute women. Journal of Sex Research 1990; 27:233–243.
  94. CHAPTERS:

  95. MacKeigan T, Muth SQ. “A Grammatical Network of Tzotzil Mayan Colour Terms”, in Carole P. Biggam & Christian J. Kay (eds): Progress in Colour Studies Volume I: Language and culture, John Benjamins, 2006.
  96. (presented as “A Network Analysis of the Emergence of a New Colour Term” at the Progress in Colour Studies Colour Conference, July 2004. Department of English Language, Institute for the Historical Study of Language, University of Glasgow, Scotland)
  97. Potterat JJ, Woodhouse DE, Muth SQ, Rothenberg RB, Darrow WW, Klovdahl AS, Muth JB. Network dynamism: history and lessons of the Colorado Springs study, in Morris M (ed.) Network Epidemiology: A Handbook for Network Survey Design. Oxford University Press, 2004: Ch. 4.
  98. Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Muth JB. “Partner notification in the early AIDS era: misconstruing contact tracers as bedroom police”, in Stanfield J and Margolis E (eds): Research in Social Policy Vol. 6 (AIDS Research/AIDS Policy: Competing Paradigms of Science and Public Policy), 1998:1–15. JAI Press Inc., Greenwich, Connecticut. [link]
  99. (presented, in part, at the "Future Directions in Partner Notification: Policy, Practice, and Research" Conference, 17 October 1996, Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta [Georgia] and at the 10th Annual Texas HIV/STD Conference, 2 July 1997, Austin [Texas].)
  100. Woodhouse DE, Potterat JJ, Rothenberg RB, Darrow WW, Klovdahl AS, Muth SQ. “Ethical and legal issues in social networks research: the real and the ideal”, in Needle RH, Genser SG, Trotter II RT (eds): Social Networks, Drug Abuse and HIV Transmission. National Institute on Drug Abuse Monograph No. 151 (NIH Publication No. 95-3889); 1995:131–143.
  101. (presented at NIDA, Rockville [Maryland] 20 August 1993.)
  102. Rothenberg RB, Woodhouse DE, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Darrow WW, Klovdahl AS. “Social networks in disease transmission: the Colorado Springs study”, in Needle RH, Genser SG, Trotter II RT, (eds): Social Networks, Drug Abuse and HIV Transmission. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Monograph No. 151 (NIH Publication No. 95-3889); 1995:3–19.
  103. (presented at NIDA, Rockville [Maryland] 19 August 1993.)

    COMMENTARIES:

  104. Brewer DD, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Roberts JM Jr. Rationale for using the term "prostitute" in scientific research. PLoS One. 2006. [link]
  105. Potterat JJ, Brewer DD, Rothenberg RB, Muth SQ, & Brody S. HIV and hepatitis C epidemics in Africa: continuing the debate. AIDScience 2003; 3:19(16 October). [fulltext]
  106. Foster KC, Muth SQ, Potterat JJ, Rothenberg RB. A Faster Katz Status Score Algorithm. Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory 2001; 7(4):275–285. [abstract]
  107. Jolly A, Wylie J, Muth S, Potterat J. Sexual networks and STIs; a tale of two cities. The Journal of Urban Health 2001; 78(3):433–445. [abstract]
  108. Rothenberg RB, Baldwin J, Trotter R, Muth SQ. The risk environment for HIV transmission: results from the Atlanta and Flagstaff network studies. The Journal of Urban Health 2001; 78(3):419–432. [abstract]
  109. Muth SQ, Potterat JJ. Every picture tells a story: mapping STD cases to depict risk. Colorado Public Health Association Newsletter Spring 1999, p.2
  110. Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Brody S. Evidence undermining the adequacy of the reproductive number formula: a matter of scale? Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2000; 27(10):644–645. [fulltext]
  111. Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Bethea RP. Chronicle of a gang STD outbreak foretold. Free Inquiry in Creative Sociology 1996; 24:11–16.
  112. LETTERS:

  113. Gisselquist D, Potterat JJ, St Lawrence JS, Hogan M, Correa M, Dinsmore W, Muth SQ. Repeating a plea for better research and evidence (Letter). International Journal of STD & AIDS 2011; 416–417.
  114. Brewer DD, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ. Withholding access to research data (Letter). The Lancet 2010; 375:1872.
  115. Brody S, Brewer DD, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ. Lack of association between heterosexual lifetime number of sex partners and prevalent HIV infection: a crucial implication. International Journal of STD & AIDS 2010 Jan; 21:74–75.
  116. Brewer DD, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Brody S. Raising the standard of evidence for determining modes of HIV transmission. Public Library of Science One 2009 May 20. [link]
  117. Brewer DD, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Gisselquist D, Brody S. Disconnects in presumed heterosexual HIV transmission in Malawi. AIDS 22(11):1377. [fulltext] [PDF]
  118. Potterat JJ, Brody S, Brewer DD, Muth SQ. Assessing anal intercourse and blood exposures as routes of HIV transmission in Mombasa, Kenya. Sexually Transmitted Infections Epub 23 April 2008.
  119. Brewer DD, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Brody S. Converging Evidence Suggests Nonsexual HIV Transmission among Adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. Journal of Adolescent Health 2007; 40:290–291.
  120. Brewer DD, Rothenberg RB, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ. Data-Free Modeling of HIV Transmission in Sub-Saharan Africa. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 2007; 34(1)54–56. [PDF]
  121. Potterat JJ, Brewer DD, Brody S, Muth SQ. The protective effect of male circumcision as a faith lift for the troubled paradigm of HIV epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa. Public Library of Science: Medicine Epub 2006 Jan 31; 3(1):e6
  122. Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Stites H. Twenty-year mortality in a 1981 cohort of homosexuals with gonorrhea: a preliminary estimate. International Journal of STD & AIDS 2001; 12(6):414–415.
  123. Potterat JJ, Muth SQ. Of vice and men: reflections on drug abuse and male prostitution. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 1999; 26:93–94. [fulltext]
  124. Plummer L, Potterat JJ, Muth SQ, Muth JB, Darrow WW. Providing support and assistance for low-income or homeless women. Journal of the American Medical Association 1996; 276:1874–1875.

BOOKS:



Order our book "In The Shadow Of Venus"

From Amazon.com (US) (UK) (EUR) (links open another site)



In The Shadow Of Venus Cover

What's it like to be a venereal disease detective?

Reading these 121 (mercifully short) true stories about people caught up in the exotic world of venereal diseases provides a front row seat to human foibles revealed in a starkly naked way.

Some stories are funny, some touching, some sad, some tragic, some raunchy, some unforgettable, and all vividly depicted.

In other words: a mirror for human nature and for our lives.



Interspersed among these sketches are frolicsome drawings that enhance the stories' impact.

Man

Like the goodies in a box of chocolates, these micro-stories can be savored one at a time, or several at a time, or (gulp!) at a single sitting in which case you would neither overdose nor get fat.

Above all, ask yourself how you would feel or react, had you been thrust into any of these peculiar situations.

Dog






Order John Potterat's book "Seeking The Positives"

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Seeking The Positives Cover

What's it like to be on the front lines of sexually transmitted disease control? How do public health workers figure out patterns of transmission?

Answer: by persistently tracing, and working with, those at high risk: adventurous young people, drug users, prostitutes, street gangsters, gays, "tri-sexuals" (those who try anything), and people one would not suspect to be at risk.

The author draws from his more than three decades of experience running an exceptionally effective local STD/HIV control program—exceptional because this program habitually challenged the received wisdom, bringing scientific rigor to an area that previously lacked it.

HIV Network

It also introduced innovative tools, such as network analysis, to elucidate STD propagation dynamics on the community level. Science is the major theme unifying both this control program and this book.

Lastly, the author details the failures of both the international health agencies (CDC, WHO, UNAIDS) and researchers in academia to implement scientifically rigorous studies of HIV transmission that could reliably answer the question: "Why Africa?"

Seeking The Positives Cover








Download John Potterat's book "SEEKING THE POSITIVES"


Free downloads!
Download either the entire book
or just the chapter on AIDS in Africa.


SEEKING THE POSITIVES

A Life Spent on the
Cutting Edge of Public Health


PDF (3.3 Mb)

ePUB (3.6 Mb)

MOBI (4.9 Mb) (older Kindles)

AZW3 (4.6 Mb) (newer Kindles)

Why Africa? The Puzzle of Intense
HIV Transmission in Heterosexuals

(Chapter 7 only)


PDF (451k)











Online Resources

I use the following free and low-cost software on a regular basis:

  • Python, by Guido van Rossum at Stichting Mathematisch Centrum in the Netherlands. Using Python, I was able to automate repetitive tasks in geospatial analysis to produce network overlays on maps.
  • Pajek, by Vladimir Batagelj & Andrej Mrvar - excellent for visualization & analysis of large networks
  • UCINet / NetDraw, by Steve Borgatti @ Analytic Technologies - provides advanced, matrix-based network analyses
  • Mage / Kinemage, David & Jane Richardson, et al. @ The Richardson Lab, Duke University - 3D network visualization
  • Statnet / ERGM, by Hunter, Butts, Goodreau, Handcock, Morris, et al. - statistical simulation of networks (presentation)
  • General Networks Links

  • INSNA - International Network for Social Network Analysis - if you're interested in network analysis, this is network central
  • NetVis - THE collection of network visualization resources, a one-stop super-shop
  • Cytoscape - for visualizing networks of molecular interaction - it could be good for many more things
  • Access Database Resources

  • DatabaseDev - a UK-based site with excellent FAQs, tutorials, forums and code
  • Blue Claw Database Design, LLC - excellent tips and tricks, stuff you won't find in any book. They will custom design systems as well.
  • Allen Browne's Tips - for Access database developers. One of the best sites out there for undocumented tips and tricks.
  • VB Forums - a comprehensive forum for Visual Basic development
  • Driverstock - Driver Downloads For Free - A great place for finding obscure device drivers.






Colleagues

I have worked with the following individuals on a frequent basis:

Devon D. Brewer, PhD, Director, Interdisciplinary Scientific Research, LLC

John Potterat, Independent Consultant

Prof. Dr. Stuart Brody, PhD DSc CPsychol FBPsS Visiting Professor, Charles University, Prague

Contact Details

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