AMERICANS WORKING TOGETHER
VIETNAM UNDER COMMUNISM
AMERICANS WORKING TOGETHER
THE PARIS PEACE ACCORDS
SEND A THANK YOU EMAIL TO OUR BRAVE TROOPS
National Medical War Memorial and Youth Education Center Project
HEROES OF THE VIETNAM GENERATION
STOLEN HONOR
LINKS TO REMEMBER
BUSH IS LOOKING GOOD
WHAT DO THESE AMERICAN CELEBRITIES HAVE IN COMMON....
UNITED STATES MARINES IN IRAQ
DO YOU LIKE TO DANCE
HBO'S MUSIC SPECIAL - WELCOME HOME VIETNAM VETERANS
TERRORIST STRIKE LONDON
THE TRUTH ON IRAQ
VANDALS ATTACK VETERANS GRAVES
ONE MAN'S WAR AGAINST AMERICA'S MILITARY
100 People Who Are Screwing Up America
CHINA AND IRAN ARE GETTING TO BE THE BEST OF FRIENDS
WHO ARE BEHIND THESE TERRORISTS WHO HATE AMERICA
WHO WOULD RATHER SEE TERRORISM SUCCEED THAN A REPUBLICAN PRESIDENT.
A DICTATORSHIP AMERICA MAY SOON SUPPORT
AMERICAN TROOPS
SUPPORT FOR OUR TROOPS NEVER STRONGER
WHILE SERVING IN IRAQ LAST YEAR
1979 IRANIAN HOSTAGE CRISIS RETURNS TO THE PRESENT
ALL DEMOCRATS, REPUBLICANS, CONSERVATIVES, LIBERALS, INDEPENDANTS; AND ALL OTHER AMERICANS
THE VIETNAM FILES
NEWS WORTH READING
IRAQI PEACE ACCORDS
AMERICAN PUPPETS?
BUSH REJECTS TIMETABLE TO PULLOUT OF IRAQ
AMERICAN POLITICS
HILLARY'S RUN FOR PRESDENT 2008
AMERICAN CONSUMER CONCERNS
WHAT ARE OUR BRAVE AND HONORABLE MEN AND WOMEN FIGHTING FOR AND AGAINST
AMERICA'S SERVICEMEN & SERVICEWOMEN
VETERANS ISSUES
DISABLED VETERAN ISOLATED AND FORGOTTEN
A WAR MASSACRE HARDLY COVERED BY THE AMERICAN NEWS MEDIA
VIETNAM UNDER COMMUNISM
DOLLARS AND SENSE
THE LUCKY FROG

 
 

This article was published by F18News on: 14 July 2005

http://www.forum18.org/Archive.php?article_id=607

VIETNAM: Three fundamental causes of persecution remain

By Magda Hornemann, Forum 18 News Service

Despite three new legal documents on religion since last November, government harassment of religious communities has not eased. Prison sentences on Mennonite pastor Nguyen Hong Quang and a colleague were confirmed in April, two Hoa Hao Buddhists were given prison sentences and massive fines the same month for distributing the teachings of their movement's founder, while Hmong Protestants in the north-west were beaten by local officials and had their properties confiscated in May. The Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam and numerous Protestant churches remain outlawed. A comparison of the situation five years ago and today shows no change in the fundamental causes of persecution: the restrictions on unregistered religious activity, the interference in the activity of registered religious communities and the lack of a transparent line of command from the central government to local officials which allows local violations to continue. If religious freedom is to improve, these three causes of persecution will be crucial benchmarks of change.

 

Over the past year, Vietnam has implemented three new legal documents on religion: a new ordinance on religious affairs and two prime ministerial decrees on how that ordinance should be implemented. The ordinance officially went into effect in November 2004 and ostensibly replaced the 1999 prime ministerial decree as the controlling government document on religion – hence the ordinance's importance (for an analysis of the ordinance see F18News 21 September 2004 http://forum18.org/Archive.php?article_id=415 ). This piece of legislation, along with the two implementation decrees – one of which specifically addresses Protestant Christian issues - was hailed by Vietnamese officials as an indication that their government was taking greater strides toward protecting people's right to "believe or not believe" in religion.

Yet, during this 12-month period, the government continued to violate religious freedom. On 8 June 2004, just days before the religious affairs ordinance was promulgated, Pastor Nguyen Hong Quang, a leader of the non state-sanctioned Mennonite Church, was arrested on charges related to an altercation in March 2004, when police allegedly entered the Mennonite church in Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon) where Quang had lived and worked, and harassed other church workers. Pastor Quang was sentenced to three years in prison in November 2004, the month when the religious affairs ordinance went into effect. In April 2005, a court upheld Pastor Quang's sentence and that of his associate, the Mennonite evangelist Pham Ngoc Thach.

In late September 2004, according to Human Rights Watch, hundreds of local officials and police in the Central Highland province of Kon Tum arrived at the home of another Mennonite pastor, Nguyen Cong Chinh. They confiscated his belongings and burned his home and chapel, which were later bulldozed. Two months later, a court in the province of Dak Nong, also in the Central Highlands, sentenced 17 ethnic minority Protestants to up to 10 years in prison for undermining national security for joining an April 2004 protest against religious repression and land confiscation. In May 2005, Hmong Protestant Christians in Vietnam's north-western provinces told Radio Free Asia that they were beaten by local officials and that their properties were confiscated.

Relations between the Catholic Church and the government remain tense as the communist regime continues to interfere in the training, appointment and assignment of priests. Father Thaddeus Nguyen Van Ly, who has become one of the most prominent Vietnamese dissidents in recent years, was released from prison in February 2005 as part of the government's general amnesty to 8,000 prisoners and the same month, the government approved the appointment of Joseph Ngo Quang Kiet as Archbishop of Hanoi, replacing the ailing Cardinal Pham Dinh Tung. Yet the government's record of interference in church affairs had prompted the Archbishop of Hue to tell Asia News in November 2004 that the new religious ordinance will continue to limit the Catholic Church's ability to conduct its own affairs.

During the same period, the state has maintained its control over non-Christian religious communities and committed violations against members of those communities. In June 2004, just as the new religious ordinance was promulgated, a Hoa Hao organisation in the United States reported that the Vietnamese government elevated a state-appointed administrative committee – headed by a long-time communist – that has been managing the religious community. The re-named Central Administrative Council arbitrarily replaced the charter of the religious community with a new one and changed the regulations governing the Hoa Hao Ancestral Temple, which is perceived by many Hoa Hao Buddhists to remain the property of the family of the religion's founder, Huynh Phu So.

In February 2005, according to the same US-based Hoa Hao organisation, two Hoa Hao Buddhists, Tran Van Hoang and Tran Van Thang, were arrested at their home in the province of An Giang for the unauthorised distribution of compact discs and cassettes containing Huynh Phu So's teachings. In April, the brothers were handed prison sentences of nine and six months respectively, while Hoang was also fined 20 million dongs (8,247 Norwegian kroner, 1,040 Euros or 1,260 US dollars) and Thang 10 million dongs. These are astronomical sums, given that Vietnam's annual per capita GDP is only some 500 US dollars. In August 2004, according to Agence France Presse, a cleric of the indigenous Cao Dai religion was arrested for illegal preaching.

In addition, the government has continued to outlaw the Unified Buddhist Church of Vietnam (UBCV), the dominant Buddhist organisation before the communists reunified the country in 1975. In May 2005, according to the Paris-based International Buddhist Information Bureau (IBIB), police interrogated several young monks in the Nguyen Thieu Monastery, where the UBCV Patriarch, the Venerable Thich Huyen Quang, is under "pagoda arrest". They were accused of disseminating special messages by the patriarch and his deputy, the Venerable Thich Quang Do, commemorating the birth of the Buddha and threatened with expulsion if they did not immediately cease all affiliations and contacts with the UBCV.

Such continued harassment has led many critics of the new religious ordinance to conclude that it is simply "old wine in new wineskins". Truong Tri Hien, a former leader of the unregistered Mennonite Church in Ho Chi Minh City now in exile, argued that the three documents contain considerable contradictions which provide opportunities for local officials to interpret and enforce these regulations at their own discretion (for Hien's personal commentary, see F18News 6 July 2005 http://www.forum18.org/Archive.php?article_id=598 ). Put simply, Hien and others argue that the government's policy on religion remains unchanged - and repressive.

While difficult to challenge this assessment of the regulations, it may be premature to conclude that government policy will not be affected by them. After all, the ordinance only went into effect seven months ago, and the two decrees even more recently. It is difficult to imagine how any government can reverse policies and practices that have been in existence for nearly thirty years with one stroke of the pen, let alone a government that has had very strained relations with the religious communities.

Moreover, even if policies are easy to change, mindsets are not. Communist party and government officials mostly remain trapped in the anti-religion mindset. Furthermore, even if any of the officials were remotely sympathetic to the plight of religious believers, they would likely still give priority to their personal political and professional interests. More time may be required before it is clear how far these regulations will eventually effect real changes in the state of religious freedom.

However, how much time is sufficient to reach a solid conclusion about the impact of this latest round of regulations? Given that it was approximately five years ago in April 1999 that the government last promulgated a prime ministerial decree on religious affairs, five years may be a useful reference point to make such an assessment. Moreover, it was around this time in 1998 that the United States became the first – and so far only – country to enact a law that required its government to issue annual reports on the conditions of religious freedom across the globe, and Vietnam's religious freedom conditions very quickly became the focus of US congressional attention, particularly when the two countries signed and ratified their Bilateral Trade Agreement.

Five years ago, the UBCV was already a banned religious organisation. The patriarch was already under pagoda arrest and the second-ranking leader of the group was under regular surveillance by the government. Government officials harassed UBCV monks, preventing them from conducting charitable acts such as flood relief. Some were not even permitted to renovate the pagodas where they lived. Ultimately, in 2001, the Venerable Thich Quang Do was placed under house arrest in punishment for trying to organise other monks and nuns to take the UBCV patriarch from his place of confinement in Quang Ngai province to Ho Chi Minh City for medical care.

Since then, the patriarch has been allowed to seek medical care outside his place of confinement and met the prime minister in 2003, who reportedly told the patriarch that his confinement and that of the Venerable Thich Quang Do resulted from "mistakes" by local officials. Following this meeting, the government terminated the detention order against the patriarch. Yet, after UBCV leaders met to discuss UBCV affairs, both the patriarch and the Venerable Thich Quang Do were re-confined to their residences, where they remain today, while some of the other monks who participated in this meeting were sentenced to long-term administrative detention.

About five years ago, the government had just conferred recognition on Cao Daism (1997) and Hoa Hao Buddhism (1999) (for an analysis of the backgrounds of these indigenous Vietnamese religions see F18News 28 July 2004 http://www.forum18.org/Archive.php?article_id=378 ). The key pre-condition for state recognition of both religions was the establishment of state-appointed administrative organs for them. By all accounts, these state impositions faced strong resistance. In fact, in 2000, some Hoa Hao Buddhist leaders attempted to establish a management organ apart from the state-approved one, leading to the imprisonment of several Hoa Hao Buddhists. Adherents of Cao Daism have also been arrested and imprisoned, including two in October 1998 who tried to meet the visiting United Nations Special Rapporteur on Religious Intolerance. They were held for two years.

The issue of management has not been the only issue confronting Hoa Hao Buddhism and Cao Daism. Hoa Hao Buddhists have repeatedly complained that the government has refused to publish all the writings by the founder of the religion. They have also felt that the communist regime has never provided a satisfactory explanation for his death, which many Hoa Hao Buddhists suspect was at the hands of the communists. Adherents of Cao Daism have complained that the government has not permitted them to conduct the necessary rituals for selecting their clerics. However, for adherents of both faiths, the key complaint against the state, aside from the state's imposition of the management organs, is that it has not returned properties confiscated after 1975.

Arguably, the Catholic Church in Vietnam has had better relations with the Hanoi government than other religious communities, partly because of the significant role Catholicism has come to play in Vietnam's modern history. It is also a reflection of the communist regime's desire to normalise relations with the Vatican. The Vatican and Hanoi had long worked on an agreement over the procedure for appointing bishops. Nonetheless, the government retains inordinate control over selecting seminarians and assigning priests to parishes. This state interference has left the Church complaining of too few priests to serve the growing Catholic community. The Catholics also face the problem of confiscated properties, many of which remain unreturned.

These issues were already on the agenda in talks between the Vietnamese government and the Catholic Church when Father Ly, viewed by some Vietnamese Catholic clerics as a maverick, was arrested for joining other Vietnamese religious leaders in trying to establish an interfaith organisation independent of the state. In the eyes of the communist regime, his crime was compounded soon after when he submitted written testimony about the state of religious freedom to the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom in Washington. Eventually sentenced to 15 years in prison, his recent release was most likely the result of extensive foreign pressure on the Vietnamese government.

For Protestant Christians, the situation five years ago was grim. Although the state finally recognised the Evangelical Church in the south in 2001, the unregistered house church community faced constant harassment from local officials. Although some unregistered Protestant leaders, including Pastor Quang, were "invited" to visit the head of the Religious Affairs Committee in 2002, the meeting yielded no positive results. Pastor Quang was indeed eventually arrested and imprisoned. In the meantime, religious minorities in the Central Highlands and the north-western provinces were actively repressed, with a steady flow of reports detailing the gruesome means by which local and provincial officials forced the religious minorities in these areas to renounce their faith. Demonstrations from 2000 by the Central Highlanders culminated in mass marches in February 2001, whose main grievances against the state were the confiscation of properties and the denial of religious freedom. These demonstrations resulted in an overwhelming state crackdown that landed numerous Central Highlanders in prison while forcing others to flee across the border to Cambodia.

This brief overview has demonstrated the remarkable similarity between the state of religious freedom five years ago and today. None of the issues then on the agenda has been resolved. Not only has the government failed to end attempts to control and repress religious communities, some have even argued that the regime has found new instruments of control, in part through the newly-promulgated religious ordinance. Some Protestant leaders maintain that the government is now employing the Evangelical Church of Vietnam in the south as a means to control Protestant congregations in the Central Highlands. In effect, the regime is attempting to curtail Protestant activities there by only allowing congregations registered as part of the Evangelical Church of Vietnam in the south to function.

Although this overview leads to the depressing conclusion that the communist regime has failed to improve its policy and practice toward religious communities, it has also yielded a few benchmarks by which foreign governments and organisations can assess how much genuine progress in protecting religious freedom will have taken place five years from now.

First, it is clear that the communist regime must end its ban on certain religious communities and restrictions on the activities of any religious community simply because it has not been approved by the state. One of the fundamental causes of harassment of individual communities is the very fact that the regime has demonstrated no willingness to cease or at least restrain its arbitrary power to deny state recognition to some religious groups. Without change in this fundamental policy, no changes in regulations will bring about genuine religious freedom.

Second, the regime must also be willing to cease its control over state-sanctioned religious communities. No genuine religious freedom can exist unless religious communities can determine their own affairs in accordance with their own wishes and regulations. The new religious ordinance is unlikely to help promote religious freedom as it continues to stipulate the state's prerogative in determining who may lead religious communities and what those communities can do.

Finally, there is no clear and predictable line of authority in which the central government is ultimately held accountable for all official policies and practices, allowing harassment of religious communities to continue unchecked at local level. In the new religious ordinance and its predecessor, the provincial and local governments have been conferred powers to manage religious affairs in their areas. While this is rational - central government would not be burdened with the minutiae of administering state policies on a local level - this approach is filled with potential pitfalls: the central government can always attribute religious freedom violations to over-zealous or corrupt local officials, as did the prime minister to the UBCV patriarch. Without ensuring that the central government will ultimately be held accountable for religious freedom violations, it will be difficult to advance genuine religious freedom in Vietnam.

Article 38 of the new religious ordinance stipulates that should any provisions of the ordinance conflict with stipulations in international treaties that Vietnam has signed, "the regulations prescribed by the international treaties shall prevail". Vietnam has acceded to a number of human rights conventions guaranteeing religious freedom, including the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Whether or not the Vietnamese government means what it says when it claims to want to implement religious freedom will depend on whether it can meet these three crucial tests.

(END)

For a personal commentary on the latest legal moves, arguing that the Vietnamese government should be judged by its continuing attacks on its own citizens' religious freedom, and pleading for action to be taken against to government to force it to abide by international human rights standards. see F18News 6 July 2005 http://www.forum18.org/Archive.php?article_id=598

For an analysis and commentary, arguing that trade alone will not bring religious freedom and advocating consistent foreign pressure to support the Vietnamese people's struggle for religious freedom, see F18News 2 February 2004 http://www.forum18.org/Archive.php?article_id=242

For an analysis of the Ordinance on Belief and Religion, see F18News 21 September 2004 http://www.forum18.org/Archive.php?article_id=415

For a report on state interference in the indigenous Vietnamese religions of Cao Daism and Hoa Hao Buddhism, see F18News 28 July 2004

 

 

 

VIETNAM 22 YEARS AFTER UNIFIED UNDER COMMUNISM

http://www.vietquoc.com/under-frame.htm

Before April 30, 1975, the propaganda system of the Communist regime in Ha Noi had concentrated great efforts to depreciate the non-Communist regime in South Vietnam. It tried the best to prove that everything done by the South Vietnamese government was wrong or false or corrupt.

After 22 years, the Hanoi government has done nothing better than what the South Vietnamese had in 1955 when the late President Ngo Dinh Diem came to power.

1. Though annual economic growth is reported at 8 to 9 percent during the last few years, the gap between the rich and the poor gets larger and larger. The South Vietnamese peasants' life are much worse than during the war. This year, despite the fact that rice production in the Mekong delta greatly increases, the farmers earned much less. Hanoi is selling rice at very low price for hard currency and the farmers suffered. Meanwhile, people in many mountainous areas particularly in North Vietnam are frequently facing starvation.

In 1975, South Vietnam was better than the Southeast Asian countries in every aspect though it was in war especially in freedom of speech. Now those countries are taking advantages of Hanoi's ill management to exploit cheap labor and natural resources, not much different from what the French colonialist regime had done before 1945.

2. Corruption becomes out of control and it seems that there is no way to stop it. Everyone in Vietnam admits that corruption now is at least a hundred times more than under the former Saigon government. Authorities at any branch, any level are squeezing bribes from all walks of life, businesses of all sizes, in all kinds of services. The poorest - sidewalk peddlers, cyclo drivers - are not spared. The lowest bribe is a filter cigarette, the highest is unknown, but certainly both extremes exceed those in the former regimes.

3. Education suffers a serious downgrade, both in culture and in ethics as well as knowledge in science and technology. Communist high ranking cadre Tran Bach Dang has admitted that South Vietnamese students in 1975 were much more polite than those in North Vietnam.

Social evils such as prostitution, drugs, sex related diseases, gambling, organized crimes, homicdes are rising several times higher than when America troops were still in South Vietnam.

4. The South Vietnamese regime had a relatively stable judiciary system with every efficient law and regulation for a free economy. Since April 30, 1975, the communist regime has revoked all laws in South Vietnam without replacing the new ones, because they had none. Handful of newly enacted laws and regulations since 1985 are ambiguous and can be amended overnight without notice. The more and more worsening red tape fosters corruption and hinders economic reforms and management, and foreign investment.

South Vietnam representatives in various international conferences were often elected to be chairmen or vice chairmen of the presiding panels. South Vietnam foreign ministry was also entrusted with drafting the UN convention governing the rights over the waters and continent shelves. It is impossible to say when the Hanoi government will be capable to be given some similar tasks..

5. Environment protection has been ignored or just belittled. Forests were destroyed at least 4 times (estimated in 1982) than that defoliated by American and South Vietnamese armed forces in war. Abuse of quick lime as insecticide in North Vietnam seriously reduced the population of birds and particularly fishes in most water bodies. South Vietnam suffers the same by ill planned irrigation canals.

6. Since the 1980's, Hanoi government restored almost everything that it had abolished in South Vietnam in 1975. A few examples, in education: re-establishing the school surveyors in charge of discipline and study; re-establishing the "baccalaureate part I and part II" (high school diploma part I after 11th grade and part II after 12th grade) ; restoring school uniform. However, while Hanoi is building up large national revenues, money allocated to education are below 11 percent of national budget, or around $7 per student a year.

7. Before 1975 in SVN, only the central government ran national reconstruction lottery, selling less than 700.000 tickets a week. It was attacked bitterly by Hanoi propaganda. Since 1976, dozen provinces have been running lotteries and selling several million tickets a day, each drawing prizes daily.

7. South Vietnam has many times won various Asian sports championship in tennis, table tennis, soccer. For the last. 22 years under the Hanoi regime, sports have suffered a lot. Teams and individual athletes won no prize. A German soccer coach who had been training the South Vietnamese national soccer team before 1975 returned to Vietnam a few years ago in a contract to train a national team but he resigned a few months ago because a disagreement with the communist authorities and , understandable, because of despair over the ill management and political interference.

Most of the matches in Vietnam today end up with politically pre-arranged scores.

8. If the Communist leaders in Hanoi had kept their promise of reconciliation after April 30, 1975, had had not locked up several hundred thousand former South Vietnamese officers and civil servants in concentration camps for years, their Communist regime would certainly face little opposition and would have built a prosperous Vietnam, far better than any Southeast Asian countries.

________________________________

YOUNG VIETNAMESE LIVING IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES!

You are young patriots who may think a lot about Vietnam, your mother country.

The best way you should do to help our beloved nation and people is to liberate Vietnam from the Hanoi dictators by the most peaceful way possible and conforming to the laws of the countries you are living..

Join any Vietnamese party or movement or organization that aim at democracy, freedom and human rights for Vietnam among the Vietnamese émigrés. You will be the main force unifying the Vietnamese patriots abroad in struggling for the better Vietnam.

BELIEVE IN OUR VICTORY.

Before November 1991, who could have thought that the formidable Soviet Union would collapse without shedding a drop of blood, even after the disintegration of the Eastern European Communism?

*****

american_flag2.gif
 
 
 
 
Why are the two teenage boys' in the below picture eyes closed?

closeup_george_and_jack.jpg

 
I found this great PTSD article on a military base.   It was in a FAMILY MAGAZINE for American troops.
PTSD does not only hit our military men and women.    It impacts a great number of Americans, who never left home...
Child abuse, elderly abuse, marital abuse, street crime victims (rape), etc. are some of the biggest sufferers.
Understanding PTSD is a great way from keeping it from passing down through generations.
 
 
 

 
 
VICE-CHAIRMAN OF ATTORNEY ETHICS WENT TO TRIAL FOR LEGAL MALPRACTICE AND LOST TO A PTSD VET     http://home.earthlink.net/~ptsd_discrimination/id12.html
 

 
 
MORE  AND  MORE  LIBERAL-DEMOCRAT  LEADERS  ARE  LINING  UP  TO  COMPARE  THIS  WAR  ON  TERRORISM  WITH  THE  VIETNAM  WAR.     SINCE  HOLLYWOOD'S  MOVIES  WERE  MOSTLY  ALL  WRONG  ABOUT  THE  VIETNAM  WAR  AND  YOU  WERE  NOT  TAUGHT  ABOUT  THE  VIETNAM  WAR  IN  SCHOOL,  LEARN  IT  ON  THE  INTERNET...
THE  BELOW  ARTICLES  COME  FROM  THE  BOOK
DIRTY  LITTLE  SECRETS  OF  THE  VIETNAM  WAR
 
jane_s_dirty_secrets2.jpg
jane_s_dirty_secrets1.jpg
 
***
 
IS  HISTORY  REPEATING  ITSELF...
(Who Are Today's Terrorist Connections?)
 
Two recently discovered documents captured from the Vietnamese communists during the Vietnam War strongly support the contention that a close link existed between the Hanoi regime and the Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) while John Kerry served as the group's leading national spokesman.
 
Researchers Troy Jenkins and Tom Wyld located the two Vietnamese communist documents referenced above in the archives of the Vietnam Center at Texas Tech University, in the Douglas Pike Collection. Douglas Pike was a leading authority on the Vietnam War who collected over 2 million pages of original documents now archived at the Vietnam Center. James Reckner, Ph.D., Director of the Vietnam Center at Texas Tech, verifies that the documents in the Pike collection are original and authentic. The Circular and the Directive are listed as items numbered 2150901039b and
2150901041 respectively.
 
 
 
IS  HISTORY  REPEATING  ITSELF...
(Who Are Today's Terrorist Connections?)
 
Yes, the American Liberal News Media is one connection.
 
 

 

Amnesty International: Insurgents are guilty

The Amnesty International report — "In Cold Blood: Abuses by Armed Groups" — said (terrorist) insurgents were guilty of direct attacks intended to cause the greatest possible loss of civilian life, indiscriminate attacks resulting in the deaths of civilians, targeting humanitarian organizations, abductions and killing captured and defenseless police and military personnel.

"There is no honor nor heroism in blowing up people going to pray or murdering a terrified hostage.  Those carrying out such acts are criminals, nothing less, whose actions undermine any claim they may have to be pursuing a legitimate cause," Amnesty said.

 
Rights Group Denounces Iraqi Insurgents
----------------------------------------------------------------------

A  MASSACRE  FEW  AMERICANS  HAVE  HEARD  ABOUT

http://home.earthlink.net/~ducducvietnamfriends/an_unknown_massacre_in_vietnam/

http://home.earthlink.net/~americans_who_lived_as_peasants/