Paul Wolfowitz

I think all foreigners should stop interfering in the internal affairs of Iraq. Those who want to come and help are welcome. Those who come to interfere and destroy are not.

Paul D. Wolfowitz, qtd. in The New York Times, 22 July 2003

Paul Wolfowitz

"Wolfowitz, on the other hand, is a preeminent hard-liner from the Reaganite side of the party which advocates an aggressive US policy of rolling back perceived threats. He is dean of Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies and former undersecretary of defense. 'Wolfowitz is one of the best representatives of the classical neo-conservative Reagan Republicans. He believes very strongly that power can be used very effectively to create more power,' Wurmser told The Forward of New York. For years Wolfowitz has been pushing hard to arm the Iraqi National Congress, complaining to the House International Relations Committee in February 1997: 'For all the talk about supporting the opposition, the United States has yet to deliver a single rifle.' More recently, Wolfowitz has advocated the use of US ground troops to carve out pieces of Iraqi territory, telling The New Republic in December: 'It will take American forces to create a protected area in which opposition forces can organize and to which units from Saddam's army can defect.' Gen. Anthony Zinni, commander of American forces in the Persian Gulf, called such plans 'a Bay of Goats' scenario." -- Rogues' Gallery: Who Advises Bush and Gore on the Middle East?

Paul Wolfowitz, VelociraptorPaul Wolfowitz, velociraptor.

News and resources

Delusions of Empire: How is Paul Wolfowitz keeping a straight face these days? (Slate, 25 June 2003) Wolfowitz Sees Challenges, and Vindication, in Iraq (New York Times, 22 July 2003) On democracy: One step forward, two steps back (The Hill, 14 May 2003)

Last week, Wolfowitz gave an interview to CNN-Turk, a joint venture of CNN and a Turkish media conglomerate. When asked about the future of U.S.-Turkish relations, Wolfowitz said that if Turkey wanted to get back into America's good graces, the Turks would have to admit they were wrong to deny the U.S. permission to use their territory as a staging ground for invading Iraq and, in essence, apologize.

That's a rough demand for a fellow democracy and a longtime ally. But what raised the ire of many Turks was another of Wolfowitz's statements: the Bush administration, he said, was disappointed that the Turkish military "did not play the strong leadership role on that issue [i.e., the Iraq debate] that we would have expected."

Outside the context of Turkish politics, that statement might seem obscure or insignificant. But in Turkey the meaning seemed painfully clear: The United States wished the Turkish military had either overruled the elected government or perhaps even pushed it aside in favor of one more subservient to U.S. demands.

As numerous Turkish commentators have noted, that's an odd stance for a country now presenting itself as the champion of Middle Eastern democracy. But it's particularly ill-conceived at the present moment in Turkish political history.

Wolfowitz blocked China hosted summit on North Korea in 1980s: documents (AFP, 25 April 2003) Pentagon Official Outlines Postwar Plans for Iraq (NPR 11 April 2003) Juan Williams of NPR interviews Wolfowitz about Iraq war (NPR 7 April 2003) Nathaniel Hurd: Wolfowitz Profile (New York Times Magazine - Other Sources - 22 Sep 02) Wolfowitz on Padilla on NPR 6/11/02 Paul Wolfowitz, velociraptor (The Economist, 7 February 2002)

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Last modified: Fri Aug 8 10:37:05 CDT 2003