THE PATRICKS OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS
William Wilson Patrick

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Early Texas Capital

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William came to Texas with his father in 1837.   Just a boy in his mid teens, he grew to be a man quickly, due to the harsh unsettled land that tested them daily.  In the early years there was always the threat of Indians, and or disease.  His older brother, Alexander Bell Patrick lost six children to malaria.  Alexander and his wife could not get over this tragedy and decided to return to Kentucky. 

 

Alexander had received a land grant from the Republic, and sold it to William when he returned to Kentucky.  This property, added to the land grant that William received from the Republic, made him a young man of considerable means. 

 

William’s original 320 acres were on Certificate #177 issued by the Board of Land Commissioners for the County of Robertson on May 3, 1841.

 

In 1844 William married Mary Jane Reed,  and from this union two children were born.  Mary was the daughter of Captain Henry Reed, who fought for the Republic’s independence at the Battle of San Jacinto  Henry Reed and his family were sworn in as colonists in Sterling C. Robertson’s Colony on February 2, 1835.  Mary Jane died in 1849, and in the same year Williams father, Alexander deeded him the 640 acres from his original Republic grant.  

 

In the next forty years William Wilson Patrick lived at Horn Hill and Pillow Point in Limestone, County, then back to Robertson County, and finally Leon, County.  After the death of his first wife, William married a woman from Wheelock, Texas.  Her name was Sultana Ann Moore. 

 

 

 

 

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Franklin, Texas
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Patrick Masonic Lodge

In 1850 he was made a Master Mason in Eutaw, Texas and was a Charter Member of the Patrick Lodge No. 359 which was named in his honor.  He was elected twice to the Legislature, and served three times as Robertson County Treasurer.

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A letter from Representative W.W. Patrick
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Original on file at Herzstein Library San Jac Monument

William Wilson Patrick passed away on March 30, 1889, and was laid to rest next to his second wife Sultana and his grand daughter Sallie Ellison in the Owensville Cemetery.

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WILLIAM WILSON PATRICK

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The Republic Minute Man

 

On September 1, 1841 a Public Debt was approved to be paid to William Wilson Patrick, on an outstanding claim, made of the Late Republic of Texas.  The debt was for the balance of pay as a Minute Man.  I believe William Wilson Patrick was a member of a forty-five-man company of Robertson County Minute Men, under the command of Captain Eli Chandler.  Captain Chandler was elected on March 29, 1841, and on April 21, of the same year, led his men against the Indians in the Battle of Pecan Creek in what is now Cooke County.  The Republic Minute Men were authorized to encourage frontier protection by an Act of the Republic on February 4, 1841.  CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE PUBLIC DEBT, that is on file in the Texas State Archives.

 

 

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This house was built by W. W. Patrick at Eutaw near Kosse, Texas.
The Patrick's new home was built of sawed lumber, hauled by oxen from Huntsville, Houston County, Texas.  The house had five rooms a kitchen, and furnishings that included a square "Sam Houston" style piano in the living room.  The Family moved in on Christmas Eve, 1860. 
 
 

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Owensville Cemetary, out of Franklin, Texas
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William Wilson's final resting place.

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Headstone Caption

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HERE LIES AN HONEST MAN
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Reverse caption on headstone

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"The Patricks of the Republic of Texas",   Copyright 2007 Robert Scott Patrick