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 SOC 117: CALIFORNIA YOUTH IN TRANSITION
Library guide

Fall Quarter 2003

This guide is meant to assist you in conducting research for your final papers. Resources are listed below to help with either approach you may take in the assignment, i.e. demographic or ethnographic.

Note: Your are invited at any time to consult with a librarian at the Reference Desk or Government Publications in McHenry Library, if you can't find what you are looking for.

Step 1: Take a few minutes to read about your topic in a sociology encyclopedia; this is an effective and time saving first step in the research process. Encyclopedias can help you define unfamiliar terms, understand the parameters of current debate in a particular area of research, and provide you with preliminary bibliography on the subject. The following are located on the Reference shelves behind the McHenry Reference Desk:

International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences, vols. 1-26 (Ref H41 I58 2001)
(E.g. criminal justice, ethics of; criminal justice, sociology of; crime: sociological aspects; crime and ethnicity; crime and gender; crime and class)

International Encyclopedia of Sociology, vols. 1&2 (Ref HM17 I54 1995)
Search the index for the following headings relevant to the broad topics suggested in the class syllabus i.e. nationalism, environmental sociology, sociology of education, media and sexuality, interpersonal communication, drugs and society. These are suggested headings; there are many more in the index.

Encyclopedia of Sociology, vols. 1-5 (Ref HM 17 E5 2000)
`Search the index for the following headings relevant to the broad topics suggested in the class syllabus i.e. nationalism, environmental sociology, sociology of education, media and sexuality, interpersonal communication, drugs and society. These are suggested headings; there are many more in the index.

Dictionaries of Sociology
There are several good dictionaries located on the reference shelves at Ref HM 17...if you don't understand a term, look it up.

Step 2: Locate books and scholarly journal articles on your topic.

Books:

Articles in scholarly journals:

Use the library's How to...Find Journal Articles (http://library.ucsc.edu/ref/howto/)

Remember there is a difference between an article published in a scholarly journal and one published in a popular magazine. Use the library's How to...Distinguish Between Scholarly and Popular Periodicals (http://library.ucsc.edu/ref/howto/popularscholarly.html) to determine the difference.

Databases most useful for this assignment:

The following indexing and abstracting online services can be accessed through the library's homepage (http://library.ucsc.edu/). Select "Research" and then type the name of the database in the search window. There are many other subject specific databases to search, see a reference librarian for assistance.

InfoTrac Expanded Academic ASAP: (Articles in magazines and journals; Articles from both scholarly journals and popular magazines.) Good place to start for the current debate on topics. Remember to check "Cruzcat" for the titles of journals that are not available in full-text in this database.

Sociological Abstracts: (Citations for articles from over 2,600 journals, books, conference papers, and dissertations in sociology and related disciplines.) To get there: Select "Research" on the library's homepage and then type the name of the database in the search window. Check "Cruzcat" to see if we own the title of the journal you need.

LexisNexis Academic: (Full text and abstracts of news, business, and legal information from nearly 6,000 newspapers and journal titles). .) To get there: Select "Research" on the library's homepage and then type the name of the database in the search window.

Step 3: Statistics for the demographic paper. Use the library's How to...Find Statistics (http://library.ucsc.edu/ref/howto/)

Also see:
Government Publications homepage
(http://library.ucsc.edu/gov/index.html)
(Under "California," then "California government agencies," then search by topic. Also "U.S. Census data," American Factfinder, limit to California.)

Rand California (http://ca.rand.org/cgi-bin/homepage.cgi)
(Online source for California and U.S. statistics) Go to "Research" from the library's homepage, then type Rand in the search window.

Print Sources: U.S. & California state government publications (selected list):

A very few selected Web sites:

Children's defense, "2001 Children in the States": http://www.childrensdefense.org/statesdata.htm
Choices for Youth, "Facts and Stats": http://www.preventviolence.org/facts/key1.html
Alan Guttmacher Institute, "Youth": http://www.agi-usa.org/
Children Now, "California Focus" http://www.childrennow.org/california/

Citation Style: Use the "APA Style Citations and References" guide. (http://library.ucsc.edu/ref/instruction/refguides/apa.html)

Page Created by: Cheryl Gomez, Sociology Librarian, cherylg@ucsc.edu


Contact Annette Marines (amarines@ucsc.edu). Last updated October 2003.

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