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FAQ

Q1.      Can I choose the fonts? 

Q2.       How do you quote?

Q3.       What information should go on the back of the business card?

Q4.       My customer only wants his name in Korean on the front side, is that okay?

Q5.       What will the Asian side of my business card look like? 

Q6.       The person is Chinese, so should I ask him to write his name in Chinese?

Q7.       My client has an old card, should I fax that also?

Q8.       The spelling of his name is unpronounceable, so should I ask him to pronounce it for me?

Q9.       I want to put the Japanese into an existing English Quark file.  Is that possible?

Q10.     How to I get a price from you?

Q11.     Should I send the original electronic file?

Q12.     I am currently using Mac English Quark in designing.  Why can’t I take your Mac Japanese Quark file and place it in my English Quark?

Q13.     Why can’t you just give me the Japanese text translation so I can lay it out myself in Word, Quark, Illustrator, etc.?

Q14.     Can I give you my English Quark file and have you replace it with Chinese?

Q15.     Which languages do you translate or typeset in?

Q16.     What is meant by translation?

Q17.     What Mac applications do you support?

Q18.     What Windows applications do you support?

Q19.     What’s the difference between Simplified and Traditional Chinese ?

Q20.     Can I send you a Mac zip disk or a CD?

Q21.     My translator used PC Word to write his translation, can I send that to you?

Q22.     When I took our company’s computer made-for-Taiwan brochure to Shanghai, why was the distributor unhappy with the translation?

 

Technical Questions:

Q23.     What is “Double-Byte Encoding”?

Q24.     What is an EPS outlined file?

Q25.     What is a PDF file?

Q26.     What is FTP?


 

Q:    Can I choose the fonts?

A:     Yes, in some of the languages.

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Q.     How do you quote?

A.     Prices are quoted on a per job basis depending on quantity, content, complexity of layout and the final requirement.

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Q.     What information should go on the back of the business card?

A.     In the case of Chinese, Japanese and Korean business cards, the font side is in English and the reverse side contains all the information appearing on the front side in either English or the target language.  To make the best impression, the Asian side should not be less impressive than the English side in terms of color, logo, etc. Translation of address is not useful for any practical purpose other than helping the reader pronounce the street, city or state. Business cards should be presented with decorum, usually with both hands; position the card so that it is in the reading position to the receiver.  Do not be offended if your name is not pronounced exactly as you say it because all the sounds may not be available in that language, and every language has an inherent way pronouncing “English” words.

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Q.     My customer only wants his name in Korean on the front side, is that okay?

A.     Yes, that’s fine. We can just do his name in Korean to be dropped above his English name.

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Q.     What will the Asian side of my business card look like? 

A.     Normally, the Asian side will match the English side as close as possible, which means that if the English side uses a serif font, the Asian side will also use a serif font and the format will resemble the English.  This applies to brochures, labels, boxes, etc.

Another format for Chinese and Japanese is called “Traditional” style where the characters are set vertically from right to left.

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Q.     The person is Chinese, so should I ask him to write his name in Chinese?

A.     Most certainly!  This goes for Japanese names as well, because although there is an English spelling for their names, there is a myriad of possibilities for character choices for the same full name. Some Koreans also prefer to have their names in Chinese characters.

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Q.     My client has an old card, should I fax that also?

A.     By all means, yes!  We want to maintain consistency in translation.

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Q.     The spelling of his name is unpronounceable, so should I ask him to pronounce it for me?

A.     Yes, we can’t write it in another language if we can’t sound it out so a phonetic spelling is helpful because almost all non-English names are translated phonetically to the target Asian language.

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Q.     I want to put the Japanese into an existing English Quark file.  Is that possible?

A.     Yes, that’s why we give you an EPS outline Illustrator file.  This format does not require any system fonts and is usable in both Macintosh and Window programs and can be printed with laser printers or can be printed out by a service bureau.

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Q.     How to I get a price from you?

A.     Just fax us a clear and readable copy of the current English version along with a fax cover sheet along with any important information such as target language and deadline.

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Q.     Should I send the original electronic file?

A.     It’s usually useful to have it, but if it’s not available, then we will scan the faxed material or original printed sheet for placement of the Asian language.

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Q.     I am currently using Mac English Quark in designing.  Why can’t I take your Mac Japanese Quark file and place it in my English Quark?

A.     In order to open a Japanese Quark file, you need the Japanese Quark program, Japanese fonts, Japanese language support installed in your computer.  Japanese, Chinese, and Korean are two-byte characters and English, Spanish, etc. are one byte characters.  As they say, “Women are from Venus and men are from mars—they are totally different.

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Q.     Why can’t you just give me the Japanese text translation so I can lay it out myself in Word, Quark, Illustrator, etc.?

A.     The answer is the same as above.  Unless you have a Japanese operating system, the Japanese Quark program or other Japanese Program in your computer, you will not be able to incorporate the two-byte translation into the one-byte English program, and further more, you need to be able to read the Asian language or have help in laying it out in the correct location.

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Q.     Can I give you my English Quark file and have you replace it with Chinese?

A.     Yes, we can replace it with either Simplified or Traditional Chinese characters, but they are EPS files placed in the English Quark file.  If you are a graphics person, you can do this yourself.  EPS files can be changed in English Illustrator, but once placed in Quark, the graphic is no longer alterable.

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Q.     Which languages do you translate or typeset in?

A.     The majority of our work involves Chinese, Japanese or Korean, but we also can provide it in Arabic, Cambodian, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Brazilian included, Russian, Thai, and Vietnamese.  If there’s another language we did not mention, please feel free to ask.

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Q.     What is meant by translation?

A.     People are often confused with the words translation and typesetting and feel they are one and the same.  Translation is the conversion of text from usually English to a target language.  It requires a comprehensive knowledge of both languages.  Ideally, the person translating the target language is a native speaker of that language; in other words, someone born and raised in that country. Someone just educated in Japan would not have the nuances and cultural attitude of a native speaker.

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Q.     What Mac applications do you support?

A.     Adobe Illustrator (Chinese, Japanese and English), Adobe PageMaker (Chinese, Japanese and English), Photoshop (English), QuarkXpress (Traditional Chinese, Japanese, Korean and English) and MS Word (English).

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Q.     What Windows applications do you support?

A.     Our work is basically done in Mac, but we do have the following programs: Adobe Illustrator (English), PageMaker (English), Photoshop (English) and MS Word (English) and is set up to read files in some Asian languages.

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Q.     What’s the difference between Simplified and Traditional Chinese ?

A.     The difference is in the writing only. Written characters can be read in Mandarin, Cantonese, Shanghai dialect, or some other dialect. In 1945 the Beijing government simplified around 2,200 characters, and these characters are used in Mainland or Big China. Simplified is used in Singapore also. Taiwan uses Traditional Chinese or complex Chinese characters. If one brochure is to be used in Taiwan, U.S. and PR China, then Traditional Chinese in the best choice.

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Q.     Can I send you a Mac zip disk or a CD?

A.     Yes. Zip disk, CD or regular Mac 1.3MB floppy disk is fine.

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Q.     My translator used PC Word to write his translation, can I send that to you?

A.     Yes, we will try to convert the file to usable Mac file.  Please ask your translator to save the file as either Rich Text or just text file.  Recently, we have had better results using the Rich Text format in conversions of the major Asian languages.

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Q.     When I took our company’s computer made-for-Taiwan brochure to Shanghai, why was the distributor unhappy with the translation?

A.     The computer terminology used in Taiwan is not the same as that used in China.  The two countries have grown apart during and after WWII and different terms are now used for changes since then in all fields where a new word or term was required.

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Technical Questions:

 

Q.     What is “Double-Byte Encoding”?

A.     Double-byte describes the Chinese, Japanese and Korean languages which takes two bytes to represent one character.  English and most of the other languages uses one bye to express one letter, such as “a”.  The reason is because the Chinese characters, some of which are also incorporated into the Japanese and Korean languages, are very complex.  The total number of Chinese characters are more than 50,000, but not all of them are actively used.

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Q.     What is an EPS outlined file?

A.     An EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) is a graphic file or a picture which can be used in many applications in both Mac and PC platforms.

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Q.     What is a PDF file?

A.     PDF stands for Portable Document Format.  The PDF file can be printed from both Macintosh and Window computers as long as the computer has Adobe Acrobat Reader.  It is a free program and can be downloaded from www.adobe.com for installation.  This is the trouble-free method of receiving the Asian language graphics file. The only drawback is that the text or layout cannot be altered.

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Q.     What is FTP?

A.     FTP or File Transfer Protocol means the file is uploaded to an FTP site and the same can be downloaded for use.  Usually, these are larger files, which are too heavy to just e-mail.

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