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February 2, 2005 -Teterboro, N.J.- corporate jet skids over highway.
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Teterboro Airport does not have adequate safety runoff areas at the ends of its runway.
Neither does Santa Monica Airport.
 
Challenger 600 corporate jets like the one below involved in this accident, fly in and out of Santa Monica Airport regularly.
 
 
 
 

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TETERBORO, NJ - FEBRUARY 2: A CL-600 Challenger corporate jet sits partially inside a warehouse after crashing while trying to take off from Teterboro Airport in February 2, 2005 in Teterboro, New Jersey. The plane, with 11 aboard, skidded across Route 46 during the morning rush hour striking two cars before crashing into the building. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

If this should happen at Santa Monica Airport, the results could be far worse. Bundy traffic is often heavy, and there is a gas station and homes just across the street from the end of the runway to the east in Los Angeles. To the west, there are homes just across 23rd street in Santa Monica. Without the proper safety runoff areas, the FAA and the City of Santa Monica are running a dangerous airport.

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Newly elected  Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersy Councilwoman Carol Skiba writes about the Teterboro Airport accident.

February 7, 2005

Wednesday, February 2nd started out with blue skies and warmer weather; the prospect of a nice day. I was in my bathroom about 7:00 AM when I heard a sound I never heard in all the years in my home. It was the sound of metal folding. The hair on the back of my neck started to stand up and my intuition said plane crash. Ten seconds after that thought my phone rang. My worst fears were confirmed - a jet had broken through the fence at Teterboro Airport, crossed Route 46 and stopped in a building across the highway.

I was at the crash site for about three hours. What I saw left me shocked and horrified. I was heartsick the whole day. I want to take this opportunity to give heartfelt thanks to all of the volunteers on the Hasbrouck Heights Fire Department for the excellent, well-coordinated, professional job they did during this very volatile situation. The jet had a whole tank of fuel and our Fire Department displayed huge resources of bravery and heroism in protecting lives.

For the past three years, I have not been attempting to close Teterboro Airport as some people may say. What I have been doing is trying to bring some sort of compromise to the table. I am very deeply concerned about the safety of the densely packed residential communities which surround Teterboro Airport, ours included.

I do not expect to close one of Port Authority's highly profitable "economic engines." However, I do expect the Port Authority to be accountable for its operation of Teterboro Airport. I also do expect Port Authority to do everything necessary to ensure safety for the residents, quality of life for the residents, to lessen the impact of noise and allow children to learn, and, depending on the results of the environmental impact study, lessen any ill health affects from aircraft emissions.

Aircraft double the size, and sometimes 3 times the size, of the aircraft that crashed this past week use Teterboro Airport on a daily basis. You must ask yourselves, where is the buffer zone, where are the safety barriers, how can Teterboro Airport handle a crash of larger aircraft. It does not take a rocket scientist to realize that as the size of the jet increases, so does the size of the emergency.

Port Authority has already vastly expanded Teterboro Airport and has more plans on the table for further expansion, all without being above board and giving notice to its surrounding neighbors. It seems very ironic to me that there was a statement in the paper about cutting flight activity, but no mention as to how much - by 1,000 flights a year, 2,000. Would those numbers really matter with 202,000 flights a year?

For those of you who feel Teterboro Airport was there first, I have friends in Wood-Ridge whose homes are over 100 years old. In fact, Port Authority condemned neighborhoods with a view toward expanding their "testing" facility. Irrespective of who you feel came first, what is obvious to those who have lived here a long time is that Port Authority not only lacks the integrity and honesty to be forthcoming about its growth and expansion, but has exhibited blatant disregard for the impact it creates on its neighbors as it expands facilities and covers wetlands.

Right in your own backyards, look back over the past 6 months and it will have to be acknowledged that Teterboro Airport had a major cocaine operation busted in August (despite representations at public meetings that everyone who uses the facility is known); a 73,000 pound jet aircraft blew off the south end runway in December (in the vicinity of your children's soccer field); and this recent jet crash which, only by the grace of God, could have been very much worse.

Our community was very lucky in 1999 when the aircraft landed in the middle of four backyards; we were equally very lucky last week that there were no children on buses going to school and that the light on the highway was red. Will the third time be charmed?

Jet Crash Amazingly Causes No Deaths
11:35 AM PST, February 3, 2005
By DAVID PORTER, Associated Press Writer

 

TETERBORO, N.J. — Passengers and crew members of a corporate jet that skidded off a runway and roared across a six-lane highway managed to walk or crawl from the fiery wreckage, and authorities expressed amazement that no one was killed.
   About 20 people were taken to hospitals, including two injured in their cars, after the crash Wednesday at Teterboro Airport, about 12 miles from midtown Manhattan.
   "I think everybody at this point is extremely lucky and fortunate," acting Gov. Richard J. Codey said.
   The jet left a trail of destruction just seconds after a crew member said, "Discontinue takeoff." The aircraft smashed into two cars on the highway and came to rest with its nose in the wall of a warehouse.
   All 11 people on the plane were taken to the hospital; the most seriously hurt among them was one of the pilots, who had a broken leg. One of those injured in a car, James Dinnall, 66, remained in critical condition Thursday morning. Five firefighters and a man in the warehouse also were hurt.
   At a hospital news conference Thursday, Rohan Foster said he was sitting at a stoplight when Dinnall, his passenger, yelled, "Look out!" Foster ducked instinctively as the jet hurtled past, shearing off the top of his Toyota.
   "I thought the plane had gone over," Foster said. "Then I blacked out. When I woke up, I didn't know what had happened." Foster suffered a broken nose and some cuts and bruises, but was otherwise in good spirits.
   The cause of the crash was not immediately known. The Bombardier Canadair Challenger CL-600 had been chartered by Kelso & Co., a New York-based investment firm, to take company employees and guests to Chicago.
   Investigators said there was no indication of trouble on the cockpit voice recorder until either the pilot or co-pilot said, "Discontinue takeoff."
   "The crew made a decision to discontinue takeoff. There was no indication why. The tape ends with the impact," the National Transportation Safety Board's Deborah Hersman said Thursday morning.
   Investigators walked the length of the 6,013-foot runway but found no spilled fuel or debris or any evidence that the plane's wings or tail struck the pavement, Hersman said.
   The plane's flaps and thrust reversers were properly positioned, she said. 
   Investigators hope to speak Thursday with the pilot and co-pilot, both of whom were hospitalized. They both were listed in fair condition Thursday morning, said Peggy Schunk, a spokeswoman at Hackensack University Medical Center.
   The airport and adjacent highway were open Thursday morning. Investigators had covered the airplane, still lodged in the warehouse, with a black tarp.
   On Wednesday, wheel tracks, plainly visible in snow, could be seen running straight off the end of the runway, through a fence and a snowbank, and then across U.S. 46.
   "Usually we see them lift off, but this one just went straight and started scratching the ground. There were sparks shooting out all over the place," said Joseph Massaro, who lives nearby.
   Bruce Hicks, a spokesman for the aircraft service company that fueled the plane before the crash, said his company did not de-ice the aircraft because the pilots did not request it. Other aircraft had taken off from the airport Wednesday morning without being de-iced, he said.
   Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Greg Martin said communication between air traffic control and the aircraft was routine before the crash. The weather was clear and wind was calm, with the temperature around 20 degrees.
   A similar plane, a Canadair CL-601 Challenger, crashed in November in Colorado while trying to take off, killing a son of NBC Sports chairman Dick Ebersol and two others.
   Kelso & Co. declined to identify the five employees and three guests on board. It issued a statement expressing relief the passengers survived, adding, "We hope that the flight crew and anyone else who may have been injured in today's accident will also be all right."

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N.Y. Times, Feb. 3, 2005, photo on bottom of page A1, and full-page article on page A23

"Jet Goes Off a Runway and Crashes, but No One Is Killed"

"Skidding out of its pilot's control, a corporate jet shot off a runway at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey yesterday, ripped through an iron fence and barreled across a six-lane highway -- striking cars, even peeling the roof off one -- before coming to rest with its nose lodged in the brick wall of a warehouse. The authorities expressed amazement that nobody was killed, though more than 20 people were injured.

"The jet, a Canadair CL-600 Challenger, which was taking off, slammed two parked cars into the wall of the warehouse...which partly collapsed and then caught fire. Other parked cars burst into flames. Terrified office workers bolted to safety while startled drivers outside confronted the surreal image of a broken plane sticking out of the building. ...The jet caught fire but did not explode, even though it was carrying enough fuel for a flight to Chicago....The most seriously injured victim was a man driving on Route 46 when the jet careered across it. He was in critical condition....The copilot of the plane -- part of the same seies as the Canadair CL-602 Challenger that crashed in Colorado nine weeks ago, killing the teenage son of Dick Ebersol, chairan of NBC Universal Sports -- suffered a broken leg.

"One official who was briefed on the investigation of the crash said that as the plane barreled up the runway, the pilot decided he did not have enough power to lift off and slammed on the brakes. The official, who was not cleared to speak for attribution, said: 'He did everything to stop. It was toward the end of the runway and he didn't have much space.'

"Almost immediately, local officials renewed calls for federal regulators to reduce traffic at Teterboro....The jet involved in yesterday's crash, the CL-Challenger, was one of 84 planes of that model built from 1980 to 1983 by Canadair, a company that was acquired by Montreal-based Bombadier Inc. in 1986. Planes from the same Challenger series have been involved in two fatal accidents in the last three years. In January, 2002, five people were killed in a crash of a CL-604 jet in Birmingham, England. Last November, Mr. Ebersol was aboard a CL-601 jet when it crashed in Montrose, Colo., killing his 14-year-old son, Edward, and two crew members.

Further down the page, another article:

"Residents of High-density Towns Near Teterboro Feared the Worst"

"Hackensack -- It is the kind of news that residents of the high-density towns around Teterboro Airport, who live with the jet whine, the frequent takeoffs and landing, and the smell of jet fuel, expect to hear but dread hearing: a plane skidding off a runway into a building, or worse, crash-landing in a residential neighborood.

Gil Bowman knows about worse. A six-passenger plane bound for Teterboro crashed in his backyard in Hasbrouck Heights six years ago and burst into flame, killing the pilot and three passengers...Mr. Bowman's wife saw an orange glow against the drawn blinds, thought the house was on fire, scooped up the 8-year-old son and 3-year-old daughter and fled out the front door..."It's inevitable that something like this is going to happen," Mr. Bowman said. Representative Steven R. Rothman, a Democrat from Bergen County who has had measures enacted to keep a regularly scheduled shuttle service and the Boeing 737 regional jet from using Teterboro, said Wednesday's accident was another indication that the airport has reached capacity. Claiming that the FAA has been slow to restrict the number of flights at the airport, Mr. Rothman said, "I hope this will get their attention, that the sleepy little Teterboro Airport is no longer sleepy."

"Twenty-three of Bergen County's 70 communities, with an estimated combined population of 300,000 are within about a four-mile radius of the airport.

"Over the years, as more corporations used the airport's two runways, and it has become increasingy used to ease congestion at the commercial airports like Newark Liberty Airport, it evolved into the top business airport on the East Coast, with some 180,000 lights a year, according to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. In 2002, there was a spike to 200,599 flights, the highest number since 1986, when there were 218,922.

"With the increase has come more anxiety, and not just about crashes. On Jan. 9, for instance, a piece of metal, 3 feet by 4 feet and weighing 20 pounds, fell from a jet taking off at Teterboro and landed in a yard in Maywood 53 feet from where a woman was standing...."


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TETERBORO, NJ - FEBRUARY 2: A CL-600 Challenger corporate jet sits partially inside a warehouse after crashing while trying to take off from Teterboro Airport in February 2, 2005 in Teterboro, New Jersey. The plane, with 11 aboard, skidded across Route 46 during the morning rush hour striking two cars before crashing into the building. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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TETERBORO, NJ - FEBRUARY 2: A CL-600 Challenger corporate jet sits partially inside a warehouse after crashing while trying to take off from Teterboro Airport in February 2, 2005 in Teterboro, New Jersey. The plane, with 11 aboard, skidded across Route 46 during the morning rush hour striking two cars before crashing into the building. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

tet10.jpg

TETERBORO, NJ - FEBRUARY 2: A CL-600 Challenger corporate jet sits partially inside a warehouse after crashing while trying to take off from Teterboro Airport in February 2, 2005 in Teterboro, New Jersey. The plane, with 11 aboard, skidded across Route 46 during the morning rush hour striking two cars before crashing into the building. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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TETERBORO, NJ - FEBRUARY 2, 2005: A car that was hit by plane after it skidded off the runway at Teterboro airport sits on on Rt. 46 Febuary 2, 2005 in Teterboro, New Jersey. The corporate jet skidded off the runway while attempting to take-off, crossing Rt 46 and slamming into a building. (Photo by Stephen Chernin/Getty Images)

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TETERBORO, NJ - FEBRUARY 2: Emergency crews line up on Route 46 at the scene where a CL-600 Challenger corporate jet crashed into a warehouse after trying to take off from Teterboro Airport in February 2, 2005 in Teterboro, New Jersey. The plane, with 11 aboard, skidded across Route 46 during the morning rush hour striking two cars before crashing into the building. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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TETERBORO, UNITED STATES: Police stand next to remains of a car that was hit by a corporate jet trying to take off from Teterboro Airport, 02 February, 2005, on Route 46 in Teterboro, NJ. The jet failed to take off from nearby Teterboro Airport, skidded across the highway and into a warehouse. Two people were in critical condition 02 February, after the corporate jet skidded off the end of a runway at New Jersey's Teterboro airport, veered across a highway and slammed into a warehouse, authorities said. Among the eight passengers and crew aboard the Canadair Challenger 600, the only serious injury was a broken leg sustained by the aircraft's co-pilot. "Most of the others were able to walk away," acting New Jersey Governor Richard Codey told reporters. However, two cars travelling on highway 46 at the time of the crash were struck by the plane, and two passengers -- one from each vehicle -- had been hospitalized with "extremely serious head trauma injuries," Codey said. One person in the warehouse was also hurt. The aircraft, bound for Chicago, was attempting to take off when the crash occured. AFP/STAN HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

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TETERBORO, NJ - FEBRUARY 2, 2005: A Challenger CL-600 corporate jet sits inside a building after skidding off the runway at Teterboro airport Febuary 2, 2005 in Teterboro, New Jersey. The corporate jet skidded off the runway while attempting to take-off, crossing Rt 46 and slamming into a building. (Photo by Stephen Chernin/Getty Images)

A Frightening Related Story

Coincidently, a frightening incident happened one sunny Saturday afternoon in mid January, involving the same type aircraft, a Challenger 600.  I was leaving my residence and walking to my car, when I observed a large commuter jet flying unusually low and south of the path where they are recommended to fly over the noise monitor. The plane did not land, but it made a tight circle north, swung around and came back again over where I was standing. But this time it approached about the lowest I have ever seen a plane around here approach. Again it flew at least 100 yards south of the noise monitor (So much for accurate noise measurements). I was afraid that it would not make it to the runway. It did land, and I was relieved to hear the reverse thrusters.

I later spoke with Matt Majoli, SMO’s Noise Supervisor. I asked for information about this plane, and he told me it was a Challenger 600, and that it is the third largest plane allowed to use the airport. I requested its elevation, and he told me it was not on their flight tracks. He did mention that, for security purposes, about 10% of planes have a discreet squawk code that keeps even Santa Monica Airport administration from viewing the flight tracks.

Speaking of security, this is a perfect example of blatant disregard for the safety and security of those of us on the ground. It is reprehensible that government allows this type of maneuver (It was all perfectly legal). As the years go by, the impacts from the airport on the surrounding communities grow and grow. What the CL600 did in Teterboro, New Jersey should be a wake-up call to all involved. Also, this type of plane was involved in a deadly crash just a couple of month’s ago in Aspen, Colorado. When will the safety of people on the ground be considered? 
                                                 
FAA, are you listening?