The Students of Liszt on Record and Reproducing Piano Roll

Twenty-one students of Franz Liszt are known to have made records, piano rolls, or both. (1) Between them, these pianists left more than 300 performances on records, and an even larger number of reproducing piano rolls - one of the most extensive and thought-provoking links that exists to 19th-century piano performance practice.

Availability is spotty, though. Some of these pianists have had their records substantially or completely reissued on CD; others have been little reissued, or not at all. (Only Rosenthal has had a high-quality reissue of his piano rolls.) Some rolls and records are almost certainly lost, such as Stavenhagen's one known recording. Even if the rolls survive, many were made for Hupfeld's virtually extinct Triphonola reproducing piano, including the rolls by Menter, Roth, and Schytte - three of the four eariest Liszt students to make piano rolls. Of course, the rolls could be translated into a digital medium, though there may not be anyone alive who's qualified, capable, and motivated to do this.

1. Master List of Repertoire. This page contains all the repertoire on records by Liszt students, along with which pianist or pianists recorded each piece. I will not do this for piano rolls, unless many more become available for actual listening.

2. Individual discographies and rollographies, below. These are more detailed than the master list. A "Yes" on the table means the pianist in question made records and/or piano rolls. An active link means the discography or rollography is online. The date format in all discographies is reversed from European practice: Year, month, date. A link in the "Remarks" section means that Charles Barber, Allan Evans or I have written about the pianist.

 Pianist

 Discography

 Rollography (2)

 Remarks

 D'Albert, Eugene (1864 - 1932)

 yes

 yes (2)

 Evans
 Ansorge, Conrad (1862 - 1930)

 yes

 yes

 Evans
 Burmeister, Richard (1860 - 1944)

 none

 yes
 
 Friedheim, Arthur (1859 - 1932)

 yes

 yes

 Evans
 Greef, Arthur de (1862 - 1940)

 yes

 yes (2)
 
 Lambert, Alexander (1862-1929)

 yes

 yes
 
 Lamond, Frederic (1868 - 1948)

 yes

 yes (2)

 Evans
 Liebling, Georg (1865 - 1946)

 yes

 yes
 
 Menter, Sophie (1848 - 1918)

 none

 yes (2)
 
 Motta, Jose Vianna da (1868 - 1948)

 yes

 yes (2)
 
 Reisenauer, Alfred (1863 - 1907)

 none

 yes (2)
 
 Rosenthal, Moriz (1862 - 1946)

 yes

 yes

 Arnest / Evans
 Roth, Bertrand (1855 - 1938)

 none

 yes
 
 Sauer, Emil von (1863 - 1942)

 yes

 yes (2)

 Evans
 Schytte, Ludwig Theodor (1848 - 1909)

 none

 yes
 
 Sgambati, Giovanni (1841-1914)
no
 Siloti, Alexander (1863 - 1945)

 yes

 yes (2)

 Evans / siloti.com
 Stavenhagen, Bernhard (1862 - 1914)

 yes

 yes (2)
 
 Sternberg, Constantin von (1852-1924)

 none

 yes
 
 Timanova, Vera (1855 - 1942)

 none

 yes
 
 Weiss, Josef (1864 - 1945)

 yes

 yes
 

(1) The five-page list of Liszt students in James Huneker's "Franz Liszt" contains several other pianists who made records, including - at least - Wilhelm Kienzl, Arthur Nikisch, Julia (or Julie) Rivé-King (piano rolls only), Camille Saint-Saens, Xaver Scharwenka, Otto Singer (piano rolls only), and Felix Weingartner (as pianist, piano rolls only). However, the extent of Liszt's influence on them is debatable. Wilson Lyle's "Dictionary of Pianists" notes only brief studies with Liszt for Rivé-King, doesn't mention Liszt at all in conjuction with Nikisch, Scharwenka or Singer, and of Saint-Saens says only that he and Liszt were friends (which is the impression one gets from reading Saint-Saens' essays about Liszt). Lyle doesn't list Kienzl or Weingartner, who were primarily composer and conductor, respectively. Alan Walker's ultra-reputable "Franz Liszt: The Final Years" does not list Schytte. In addition, several sources, including Walker, list Eduard Risler as a student. I'm sceptical because Risler was only 13 when Liszt died and isn't mentioned in August Göllerich's diary (published as "The Piano Master Classes of Franz Liszt"), but if there's sufficient interest I'll upload a discography of Risler's 18 Pathé performances. Finally, soprano Marcella Sembrich, who took lessons in musical interpretation from Liszt, can be heard accompanying herself on recordings of Chopin's "The Maiden's Wish" and Pauline Viardot-Garcia's "Aime-moi" (based on Chopin's Mazurka, Op. 33 #2).

Traditionally, Isaac Albeñiz has been included among the Liszt students; recent scholarship suggests that he was not. Since I'm loathe to remove information from the web, my Albeñiz discography and remarks are still available here.

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(2) My burning urge to post rollographies of Liszt students has been tempered by the discovery that many of them are already online at the Reproducing Piano Roll Foundation site: www.rprf.org/Rollography.html

This large rollography includes d'Albert, Friedheim, de Greef, Lamond, Menter, da Motta, Riesenauer, Rosenthal, von Sauer, Siloti, and Stavenhagen, as well many non-Liszt-student rollographies.

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