artwalks, san francisco, late 2003 through early 2004
 
we began taking what we call artwalks around thanksgiving 2003.  we did a memorable one on thanksgiving day with chef richard while the turkey roasted.  we go out looking for cool stuff to photograph, and we trade off the camera whenever coolness strikes.  we both began by thinking that Our Beautiful Natural World was the way to go, and we took lots of pictures in mclaren park and up at the overlook, and they were cool.  we kind of had an alphabet theme going.  but now it develops that what I really like (right now) are multi-layered reflections, and the mister is in love with tangles of telephone wires and barbed wire loops and old rusty jury-rigged connections.  so we drive and walk around til we see stuff we like. 

we come home with our photos and download them, giving a copy of all to each photographer.  then we fire up photoshop and make art.  see how easy that was?  it's been interesting to see that the offhanded quick shots sometimes surprise you with what they turn into.  to me, this is the 'art' part, the delightful surprise part.  it's fun to go out with the mister and hike about and take a lot of photos, and it's fun to have the cool stuff we end up with.  but the tickle-y pleasing part is when you crank it over in photoshop and it changes completely.  wow - did I do that?  so we sit around and admire each other's slide shows.  those of you who know us can picture this, right?

we've been fairly avid, going once and sometimes twice a week, shooting more than a hundred photos each outing.  digital photography is just the greatest, isn't it?  the pictures you'll see with the links below are small web versions - we've found that the full-sized images make nice 4x6 or 5x7 prints, some even survive at 8x10 if we haven't tweaked them too much.

you can find a number of my artwalk pictures on my art page

you can find a number of mark's artwalk pictures on his art page, and also at his groovy buzznet pictures-only site (this is a pretty fun community). 

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