Racing and Slope Planes

C.R. Renegade Composite

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Type: 60" racer
Wingspan: 60"
Wing Area: 420 sq in.
Airfoil:RG15
Weight:32oz
Construction: Fiberglass fuselage, carbon fiber over blue foam wing, balsa tail surfaces
Controls:Flaperons, elevator
Renegade

The composite Renegade was one of the first purpose built airplanes to be made for the then new 60" slope racer class. It features a fiberglass/kevlar fuselage with slip on nose cone, a one piece vacuum-bagged carbon fiber wing (RG-15), and removable balsa tail surfaces.

The Renegade's most notable characteristics are it's high speed and great energy retention. It's also one of the best all around slopers available. It will fly well in light lift, and, when ballasted up, it's very fast. I've had mine weighted up with about a pound of ballast so far. Roll rate is okay, though snap rolls are really fast, especially to the outside. Landings are the hardest part. When carrying a lot of weight, it comes in fast. Some people use flaperons to slow down, but I find that I loose too much aileron control with this method (there's no rudder). Instead, I use spoilerons, combined with up elevator, to control my glideslope.

Renegade: original color scheme Renegade: second color scheme
I intially covered the wing with Ultracote Plus (left). It started off nice, but got ruined on a hot day when it bubbled up. After removing the Ultracote, a friend painted the wing with pearl blue automotive paint (right)...it looked awesome!.

As far as modifications go, I recommend reinforcing the ballast area of the fuse with some extra layers of FG, especially if you plan on weighting this plane up. I've seen quite a few Renegades crack in this area. Luckily, I had reinforced mine before I started flying it, and the fuse has stayed in one piece, even after some really hard landings. It's also not a bad idea to fill the inside of the nosecone with a bit of epoxy in the front. There is a bit of airspace between the the inside of the nosecone and the front of the fuse. If you hit really hard nose-first, it's possible that the nosecone will get driven backward, causing its back edge to dig into the leading edge of the wing. Having something solid up there prevents this.

Renegade: new wing Renegade: new wing
The original wing got pretty thrashed, and was replaced by this new, pre-painted white wing.

There are newer molded planes that are faster then the Renegade, but it's still a great plane, and it can take a lot more punishment then a hollow molded sloper.

Renegade Renegade

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