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I am happy to present this new feature in which either Edward Tarabilda or myself will give a commentary on the principles of The Art of Multi-Dimensional Living/Ancient Ayurveda through an examination of that principle in the life of some great person. "Great person" does not always mean a famous person or even a "good" person. Edward's commentary will be taken from his personal files, written before his passing in 1999. Other than personal readings, this is the best way I know to present The Art of Multi-Dimensional Living/Ancient Ayurveda to all of those interested in this new subjective discipline. It truly is a spiritual science for the 21st century.

The following was written by Edward Tarabilda on 2-12-98.

ALBERT EINSTEIN

In the occult literature, a distinction is made between the higher and the lower mind. In today's society, when we speak of someone being a genius, we are generally referring to his or her lower mind, because, at this point in human evolution, it is not clear how to evaluate genius as it manifests through the higher mind.

Through the principles of The Art of Multi-Dimensional Living, it is revealed that Einstein's lower mind was at the level of genius. His higher mind was just average however. Thus, his ability to correlate his theories and findings with higher metaphysical truths was somewhat limited.

Nevertheless, Einstein's lower mind was so attuned to the vital body sheath, that he was able to clearly distinguish matter from energy, and, to some degree, energy from mind (the observer). He could not only intuit brilliantly novel ideas related to the energetics of creation, but he also had a destiny to pursue these ideas to useful working hypotheses, and later, paradigm-breaking, empirically verified conclusions.

If Einstein's higher mind had been as strong as his lower mind, then he would have been a dominant force in linking quantum physics to the ancient spiritual teachings of the east and the more modern ones of the west. His inability to lead in this arena was unfortunate because it set a precedent followed by most other theoretical physicists. Those who have broken with this precedent, like David Bohm, have, more often than not, been ostracized to some degree or viewed as odd-balls.

The Theosophist, I.K. Taimni, in his book entitled "Science and Occultism", has taken scientists to task for this neglect. It is one of the better books on the relationship of physics to metaphysics and I recommend it highly.

Einstein's failings are not as significant as his accomplishments: the establishment of a completely new worldview which, in turn, generated a whole host of new scientific hypotheses, methodologies and applications.

Just as importantly, his brilliance as a scientist was matched by his humaneness and willingness to tackle the major problems facing the world.