Constructed Wetlands
Veteran's Memorial Park, Boulder City, NV


Desert Oasis
It Began with a Vision
Partnership Built on Shared Values
A Home for the Endangered
Creating a Wetlands Environment
Volunteer Work Program
Volunteer Work Schedule


A Desert Oasis

Just 23 miles south of the City of Las Vegas, lies the tranquil oasis of the Boulder City Wetlands Park. This six-acre constructed wetland is located at the eastern edge of Boulder City, Nevada, nestled within the Veteran's Memorial Park in the Eldorado Valley.

It Began with a Vision

Hover Dam and Boulder City share a history of will and aspiration to bring richer life to the Mojave Desert. Considered a world wonder, Hover Dam provides power for the southwestern United States. Our precious water resources nurture crops, community life, and businesses throughout the region. The map and culture of the southwest would be very different without the dam that has brought energy and water to the desert environment. While Las Vegas' wastewater returns to Lake Mead through the Las Vegas Wash, Boulder City's wastewater has historically flowed out into Eldorado Valley.

In February 1995, the City Council of Boulder City adopted a resolution with the Bureau of Reclamation and Nevada Division of Wildlife for the creation of a constructed wetland within the Veteran's Memorial Park. Later that year, construction of the Boulder City Wetlands Park began with a vision of reusing Boulder City's unclaimed wastewater to irrigate the Veteran's Memorial Cemetery and provide habitat for threatened and endangered species.


Partnership Built on Shared Values

Boulder City has built a partnership with the community and other local agencies to make the Boulder City Wetlands Park come to life. This constructed wetlands stream was created to mimic a natural aquatic system, providing habitat for native endangered fish as it improves wastewater quality for irrigating the lawn at the Veteran's Memorial Cemetery. Boulder City, the Bureau of Reclamation, Nevada Division of Wildlife, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Clark County Conservation District, school groups and community volunteers have all worked together to combine their efforts to construct this exciting and innovative wetland leading down the slopes of the Eldorado Valley.

A Home for the Endangered

One of the main goals for the construction of the Boulder City Wetland Park is to create habitat for native, threatened, and endangered fish. The Bureau of Reclamation and Nevada Division of Wildlife are part of a seven agency team that has taken an active role in the preservation of the native fish in the Colorado River Basin. In June 1997, approximately 2,000 young Razorback suckers were stocked into the four Boulder City wetlands ponds. The fish are released into Lake Mojave when they are approximately 8 to 12 inches long and are considered capable of avoiding most predators.

Razorback suckers are one of the largest suckers in North America and can live to be 40 years old and can weigh up to 12 to 14 pounds. Razorbacks are found only in the Colorado River Basin. Predation of larval and juvenile Razorbacks by introduced species, like carp and sunfish, pose a major threat to the Razorback sucker population.

Over the next 8 years the team hopes to rear and stock 50,000 Razorback suckers.


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