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Statements made by family & friends
in the Revolutionary War Pension Paper Records for

NATHANIEL BARRETT Jr
of Nelson, NH
Son of Nathaniel and Abigail [Searl] BARRETT of Mason, NH
Husband to Mercy [Cummings] ~ Brother to Reuben, Isaac and
Sybil Barrett


Revolutionary War Pension Papers, W24627 for Nathaniel Barrett, Jr
[Note: The handwriting in this document is difficult to read in parts and when unreadable it is designated with "---?---". Transcribed by R. R. Owings.
Also note that some of these papers are printed in the following publication: "Celebration by the town of Nelson, New Hampshire of the One Hundred and Fifthieth Anniversary of its First Settlement 1767 - 1917 / Sketch of the Early History of the Town to Which is Added the Names and Records of the Pioneer Settlers of Packersfield who had part in the War of the Revolution" by Major-General Simon Goodell Griffin, 1917
These papers are transcribed in three parts:

PAGE 1: Papers filed by Mercy Barrett in 1838 and her son John in 1852
PAGE 2: Papers filed by Sybil Barrett (Below)
PAGE 3: Papers filed by friends

.

Below are statements made by Sybil Barrett in the Revolutionary War Pension papers of Nathaniel Barrett and partly a statement in the file of Joseph Proctor, her 2nd husband. Some of the copies I received from the file were nearly un-readable. I transcribed what I could from them.

I Sybil Proctor of Mason, County of Hillsboro & State of New Hampshire, Eighty six years of age depose and say as follows ---

I am the widow of Joseph Proctor, late of Mason forsaid a Revolutionary soldier.
I was about sixteen years old at the close of the War.
My maiden name was
Barrett & I had three brothers, Nathaniel, Reuben and Isaac who were in the Revolutionary War.

Nathl enlisted at the commencement of the War for a few months was at the battle of Bunker Hill - he was about this time, being a part of the time at Mason & a part of the time at what is now Milford - in Amherst then. He had married a girl by the name of Mercy Commings two or three years before the war. He married her in Massachusetts somewhere - I am very sure it was at "old Andover" but it might have been at Hatfield or Shrewsberry - he was working in different places in Massachusetts & I can't tell exactly where he was married but think it was at Andover. He came home not long after he was married.

In a few months after the Bunker Hill fight he came home --

I am now certain that he was in the army again, for I remember that there was a time for a good while that when he came home he came from the army & when he went away he was going to the army. I have also some recollection that when he started for Cambridge at first he started with my other brothers from Mason & that afterwards he started with a company from Amhurst.

I remember also very distinctly conversations that I have heard him have with a Dr. Gray who lived in this town after the War (cannot tell whether he lived here before or not) about a service that they were upon in Ohio during the war. Our army had got nearly starved out and the captains of the different companies picked some men to go and find something to eat, and Nathaniel was taken with others. They had to crosss a large river - had to carry their guns ready to fire much of the way, fearing the Indians. They found some cattle, and when they were driving them to camp and had come to the river it had begun to rain. It was just at night and they did not dare to cross. They had to lay on their guns all night to keep them dry, and in the morning they drove the cattle across and forded the river themselves, carrying their guns as high above their heads as they could to keep them dry. They got the cattle to the army.

I have aften heard him speak of the smoky bread and horse meat they had to eat during the time mentioned above.

Never knew of but two Nathaniel Barretts besides my brother. One was my father, who did not serve at all in the War. - he was a lame man. The other was a young man who came to Mason from Massachusetts sometime after the war. He could not have been in the War unless as ---?-- or Servant to some officer & then not from Mason. He was too young for a soldier. I never heard of any other Nathaniel Barrett besides these but my nephew at Nelson.

I have been at the house of my brother Nathaniel, both in Milford or Amherst and at Nelson. (Pecker Nelson as we used to call it). was sick there several weeks. I think he lived in Milford three or for years after the war before he removed to Nelson.

He used to make wooden mortars, bowls, trays and other dishes. I have a motar which he brought me from Nelson, made of a knot which he said would last me as long as I lived. He used to bring some on his back, almost everytime he came to Mason. He took a hard way to get a living. I remember his coming once to Mason and having helped a reaping; he took the grain he received for pay upon his shoulder to Nelson.

The bulls ran down a hill, dragging him by a chain which got hitched somehow onto his leg in such a way that a cord was torn out and he was lame always afterwards. His son Nathaniel helped him much.

He had a shock of Palsey when he was doing something to the roof of his house. They said it was hard work to get him down.

His wife was a feable woman, but she outlived him. She is dead now and all the children, but John.

I think the names of his children were Nathaniel, John, Phineas, Hannah and Nabby. I don't remember the names of the two who died young.

I think he was married at Andover for when I was sick at Nathaniel's at Nelson a Deacon Ingalls from Andover came there to see his sons & and called to see Mercy in that he might carry back word to her brother at Andover how they lived. -- at any event he was married there in these years before the war. Which fact I personnally --?-- and distinctly remember.

And I further say that I have no interest in the result of any case where my testimony is to be used as evidence.

her
Sybil X Proctor
mark

signed AD 1854

Witnessed by Willis Johnson, Justice of the Peace



PAGE 1: Papers filed by Mercy Barrett in 1838 and her son John in 1852
PAGE 2: Papers filed by Sybil Barrett (above)
PAGE 3: Papers filed by friends
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Created 14 December 2006