AN UNKNOWN MASSACRE IN VIETNAM
THE DUC DUC RESETTLEMENT VILLAGE MASSACRE BY ALAN WAUGH
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WAS THERE AN ATTEMPT TO COVERUP THE MASSACRE OF THE DUC DUC REFUGEE VILLAGE
GREAT COLLEGE OR HIGH SCHOOL HISTORY TERM PAPER TOPIC ON THE VIETNAM WAR
RECENT SATELLITE PICTURE OF THE AN HOA AREA
TET 1968 ATTACK ON THE VILLAGE
HISTORY OF THE AN HOA VALLEY
ORIGINAL WEBSITE FOR THE DUC DUC REFUGEE MASSACRE
Go Noi Island - Quang Nam Province - South Vietnam
COMBINED ACTION PROGRAM (CAP: What was it...)
ASSOCIATED PRESS ARCHIVES: DUC DUC RESETTLEMENT VILLAGE MASSACRE MARCH / APRIL 1971
THE DUC DUC RESETTLEMENT VILLAGE MASSACRE BY ALAN WAUGH
EYE WITNESS REPORTS OF THE MASSACRE
POLL AND YOUR COMMENTS ABOUT THE MASSACRE
The Experiences of a CAP Marine Living and Serving in Duc Duc
MAPS
More Details of the Massacre and Pictures of the People of Duc Duc
MORE PICTURES OF THE AMERICANS AND PEASANTS OF DUC DUC
AMERICAN JUSTICE

 
 
ALAN  WAUGH's EMAIL ADDRESS:   alananhoa@fsmail.net
 
 

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The Last Americans, Who Lived In Duc Duc

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The Last Americans, Who Lived In Duc Duc

The American Marine on the right is Jack Cunningham, the webmaster of this website.
 
 
 
 

Below is what the Duc Duc Resettlement Village looked like after it was punished for helping Americans.

PLEASE PRESS THE PICTURE FOR A LARGER PICTURE

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The Duc Duc Massacre

The first two weeks of March 1971 saw an increase in enemy activity in the province of Quang Nam. Da Nang took 16 rockets in an attack on 4th March. Throughout the An Hoa basin patrols made contact with small groups of VC or NVA.

III MAF using recovered enemy documents knew that the Communists were planning a new offensive called the K-850 Campaign. The objectives of the campaign were to attack district Headquarters, PF & RF positions, CUPP and CAP units. Da Nang would also get its fair share of rockets .

During K-850 the VC/NVA put a lot of pressure on the Vietnamese forces and their pacification programme. On 27th March the 1st Marine Division put all its units on alert against foreseen rocket attacks. On the night of the 28th Da Nang which was shrouded in low cloud came under rocket attack along with nearby allied positions.

In the province the enemy attacked Duc Duc, Dai Loc, Dien Ban, and the Que Son District Headquarters. They also attacked CUPP and CAP hamlets and refugee resettlement hamlets. Bridges and highways in the province were also attacked.

Early on the morning of the 29th at 0210 two battalions of the NVA 38th Regiment along with two VC sapper battalions charged into Duc Duc while their mortars and rockets roared in. The District HQ compound was the NVA’s primary target. Meanwhile the VC sappers attacked the nearby hamlets destroying everything in their path.

The 412th Regional Force Company and the 123d Popular Force Platoon along with a few U.S. Advisers retreated to the HQ Compound and prepared to make a last stand.The NVA encircled the compound and due to low cloud, fix-winged air support could not be used. The defenders of the HQ could see the flames coming from local villages as the VC carried on with their destruction.

In Da Nang at 0245 the Direct Air Support Center ordered the Black Hammer helicopters of 1st MAW stationed at Marble Mountain to fly to Duc Duc and assist its defenders. Black Hammer was the name given to night reconnaissance missions. The patrol of helicopters was made up of a Huey searchlight bird from HML-167 which was under the command of Captain Thomas C. Mc Donald who was the flight leader. With him were two AH-1Js Sea Cobra gunships from HML-367. Lt Colonel Clifford E. Reese commanded these birds.

Flying below the thick cloud with their running lights off, the choppers headed south-west towards Duc Duc which was about 25 miles from Da Nang. Duc Duc incidentally was only a thousand meters from An Hoa Combat base. The U.S. Marines had pulled out of An Hoa on the 15th of October 1970 leaving the base in the hands of the ARVN The burning villages acted as a beacon for the Black Hammer patrol .

The radio in the compound crackled into life as Captain McDonald contacted the U.S. Advisor. The advisor soon gave a sitrep to McDonald and informed him that they were in grave danger of being overrun. Clearance was given for the gunships to fire at any targets around the HQ’s perimeter. The advisor also told McDonald that he could not direct any air-strikes as they were under heavy enemy fire.

Mc Donald’s Huey lead the attack and the patrol dropped down to 400 feet and homed in on flashes from the enemy’s guns. Once found the Huey’s Xenon search-lights lit up the area and a hail of bullets from the 7.62mm mini-guns and 20mm cannons tore into the NVA. The gunships also fired 2.75in rockets onto a knoll which was west of the compound where the enemy had set up mortars and RPGs.

The action was close and the gunships brought their firepower as near as 30 meters from the defenders. Desperate times need desperate measures. Now the choppers were under attack as the NVA fired into the night sky. The search-light Huey was most at risk. As soon as he turned on his beam, the NVA fired at it.

The Black Hammer patrol stayed at Duc Duc for four hours. The AH-1Js took it in turns to fly back to Marble Mountain to re-fuel and to re-arm. The other birds stayed to give cover to the trapped forces in the compound.

The NVA then began to pull back towards the Song Thu Bon and started to cross the river in boats. The Black Hammer followed this withdrawal and one of the Sea Cobras fired at the boats, sinking six of them mid-stream. The NVA fired back at the birds and the Huey’s search-light operator was wounded. With a Marine injured and the enemy in retreat the Black Hammer patrol returned to Marble Mountain and touched down at 0600. During the battle the Black Hammer patrol had expended 2,800 rounds of 20mm cannon and 64 2.75in rockets. They also destroyed 6 boats and 12 hooches. The enemy KIA was four confirmed and ten probable.

For the next three days and nights the area continued to take hostile fire. HML-367 squadron carried on with the air cover and provided emergency medical envac. During the support of ARVN forces they expended 407 2.75in rockets, 14,158 rounds of 7.62mm and 1,386 rounds of 20mm ammunition.

Units of the 51st ARVN Regiment were sent to reinforce the PF and RF garrison. They made contact with the NVA throughout these three days. The NVA losses were 59 KIA while the RFs and PFs lost 20 men and 26 WIA. 103 civilians were murdered in the attacked hamlets, 96 were injured and 37 civilians were also kidnapped by the NVA.

Over 1,500 homes were destroyed by the VC sappers attack. The 38th Regiment remained in the Duc Duc area and on the 3d April Duc Duc District HQ was attacked again by the NVA. Over 100 mortars fell on the compound and surrounding villages. The NVA 38th Regiment was here to stay and take on the ARVN 51st.

Notes:

In researching this article for my book / CD An Hoa Combat Base U.S. Marines in Quang Nam Province 1966-1971 I used information from:

U.S. Marines in Vietnam 1970-71 USMC History and Museums Division.

Narrative Summary for HML-367 March 1971.

This article is the copyright of Alan Waugh 2005

If you want to get in touch, or would just like to ask some questions please email me at:  

 alananhoa@fsmail.net

 
See A Current Satellite Picture And MAP of the site of the Duc Duc Resettlment Village Massacre.
 
 
 

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AN  UNKNOWN  PIECE  OF  HISTORY  FROM  THE  VIETNAM  WAR.
(A great topic for a history term paper.)
 
The Vietnamese communists must have felt there would be a reaction in America.   Even during the Vietnam War, a massacre of hundreds and hundreds of peasant men, women and children would trigger a negative response.
 
The Vietnamese communists were taking a big chance that such a massacre could turn the American People against them.

http://www.capveterans.com/the_duc_duc_resettlement_village/id7.html

 
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WHETHER  INTENTIONAL  OR  NOT...
 
 
Back in April 1971, as John Kerry was appearing on television talk shows around America condemning his brother and sister Vietnam vets for being Baby-Killers and Village-Burners, he was helping cover up the Duc Duc Refugee Village Massacre.   Learn the details at:

WHAT DID JANE FONDA REALLY DO (In Short)
 
 
JANE FONDA AND JOHN KERRY WORKING FOR AMERICA'S ENEMY TOGETHER
 
 
A MESSAGE FROM JANE FONDA ABOUT HER VIETNAM TRIP
 
 
I might be pissing in the wind, but I have to do something...   Please press the link:   
 
 

 
TODAY'S  BRAVE  AND  HONORABLE  MILITARY  IS  TOMORROW'S  VETERANS
 
Is it fair that the Federal and State's Governments turn their backs on Veterans, when they ask for Equal Rights... 

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The below New Jersey Herald News Article is about the Duc Duc Resettlement Village.
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A  PIECE  OF  FORGOTTEN  AMERICAN  HISTORY
 
THE  BATTLE  OF  MINISINK.
 
 
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FOR  THOSE  OF  YOU  WHO  BELIEVE  THAT  JANE FONDA  IS  A  NATIONAL  HERO,  AND  FOR  THOSE  OF  YOU  WHO DON'T  BELIEVE  SHE  IS,  PLEASE  PRESS  THE  BELOW  LINK:
 

 

 
----- Original Message -----
 
Check out the Viet-Myths website.  We're another group working on trying to get the truth out on the Vietnam War. 
            Regards,
           Mike Benge,
     Former VN POW '68-73
 
 
 

Examining the Myths of the Vietnam War

A Conference,
under the auspices of The RADIX Foundation,
which took place at Simmons College,
300 The Fenway, Boston MA, 26-29 July 2004


"The Vietnam War was mis-reported by the Media, mis-recorded by the Historians, mis-taught in our schools and mis-applied in addressing policy decisions.
MMMM should replace UUUU as our recognition symbol."
 

Stephen Sherman

http://www.viet-myths.net/OSession01.htm

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It wasn't Jane's fault.   It was because her former husbands made her do it.
(SHE  MUST  BE  TRYING  TO  MAKE  A  COMEBACK.
SHE THINKS AMERICANS ARE STUPID...)
 
 

DISNEY made it big on good, moral, honorable, American family stories.  It's when DISNEY changed their format that the Corporation started having problems.

Wal-Mart made it big;  because they advertised everything sold in the store was American-Made.

Boy, how things change!!

    Jack   http://www.CapVeterans.com 

READ  JACK'S  DUC DUC  EXPERIENCES  AT:  http://www.CapVeterans.com
 
 

The Last Americans, Who Lived In Duc Duc
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The Last Americans, Who Lived In Duc Duc

CAP  2-9-2 / NOVEMBER  3 

 
Pictures of the Duc Duc Resettlement Village and More Details of the Attack at:   http://home.earthlink.net/~ducducvietnamfriends 
 
Additional Pictures of the Duc Duc Resettlement Village at:  http://home.earthlink.net/~vietnamwar
 
 

 
Surrender Was Not An Option

      
Help Democracy grow in Iraq.  Be part of the solution...   Support Civil Action Programs in Iraq.     Press here to learn about one such Civil Action Program.   Local Heroes in a Foreign War.
 
             Jack_Cunningham

 

Local Heroes

December 20, 2004
By Andrew Borene

"I think that there is no greater gift than for a man
to be willing to risk his life for the freedom of strangers."


Op-Ed Contributor: Local Heroes

December 20, 2004
By ANDREW BORENE

Minneapolis - IF the Pentagon hopes to start bringing American troops home from Iraq while also increasing security there, it will have to find a way to do more with less. One approach could be expanding the Marine Corps combined-action program, an initiative that was successful in Vietnam and has shown early promise in Iraq.

The concept behind the program is that if American and foreign troops operate together, each will gain knowledge from the other as to the best way to counter an insurgency. In Vietnam, platoons were created that combined marines and Vietnamese militia members. The Americans were handpicked, chosen because they had shown particular respect for the local culture. They were expected to live in the villages they were assigned to defend, striving to "work themselves out of a job" by training their Vietnamese counterparts in police work and security operations.

The most striking success of the program was a rapid increase in actionable intelligence. Living in Vietnamese hamlets for months, the marines got a chance to get to know the locals, who in general had kept a careful neutrality in the war. This helped to humanize the American presence and reduced the passive support many civilians had been giving to Vietcong guerrillas. For many, their respect for (or fear of) the communist guerrillas waned, and they broke their silence about intelligence leads.

In the long run, it was one of the few efforts that managed to win some "hearts and minds" in Vietnam. Unfortunately, the top brass lost interest in the program in the early 1970's and, well, the rest is history.

Last year, under the leadership of Gen. James Mattis, members of the First Marine Division in western Iraq began adapting the program to aid poorly trained Iraqi National Guard and police forces. Although it is too soon to declare success, reports from the military and the news media suggest that Iraqis in the combined-action program perform better in combat, have higher morale and are considerably more reliable than their regular Iraqi military counterparts.

Expanding the program would be best accomplished by teaming coalition troops with Iraqi security troops, or even paramilitary groups as in Vietnam, and placing them in cities along the main supply routes. This would significantly bolster the coalition's ability to gauge popular sentiment and gather intelligence leads on the pursuit of enemy leaders. It would also reduce the high profile of the coalition forces.

While the situations in Vietnam and Iraq are not identical, when it comes to battling insurgents it is always vital to erase their advantages in popular support and local knowledge. A few good marines learned how to do that during Vietnam; perhaps trying it again in Iraq can bring about a different ending.

Andrew Borene, a law student at the University of Minnesota, was a first lieutenant with the Marine Expeditionary Force in Iraq. He is an adviser to Operation Truth, a veterans' advocacy group.

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http://www.CapVeterans.com