AN UNKNOWN MASSACRE IN VIETNAM
EYE WITNESS REPORTS OF THE MASSACRE
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WAS THERE AN ATTEMPT TO COVERUP THE MASSACRE OF THE DUC DUC REFUGEE VILLAGE
GREAT COLLEGE OR HIGH SCHOOL HISTORY TERM PAPER TOPIC ON THE VIETNAM WAR
RECENT SATELLITE PICTURE OF THE AN HOA AREA
TET 1968 ATTACK ON THE VILLAGE
HISTORY OF THE AN HOA VALLEY
ORIGINAL WEBSITE FOR THE DUC DUC REFUGEE MASSACRE
Go Noi Island - Quang Nam Province - South Vietnam
COMBINED ACTION PROGRAM (CAP: What was it...)
ASSOCIATED PRESS ARCHIVES: DUC DUC RESETTLEMENT VILLAGE MASSACRE MARCH / APRIL 1971
THE DUC DUC RESETTLEMENT VILLAGE MASSACRE BY ALAN WAUGH
EYE WITNESS REPORTS OF THE MASSACRE
POLL AND YOUR COMMENTS ABOUT THE MASSACRE
The Experiences of a CAP Marine Living and Serving in Duc Duc
MAPS
More Details of the Massacre and Pictures of the People of Duc Duc
MORE PICTURES OF THE AMERICANS AND PEASANTS OF DUC DUC
AMERICAN JUSTICE

Help Democracy grow in Iraq.  Be part of the solution...
             Jack_Cunningham

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Taken from the Vietnam War-Almanac .
General Editor;  Mr. John S. Bowman 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----

To: Jack Cunningham (Proud CAP Marine)

From: "Dennis S. Sherman" <marine@stic.net>

Sent: Monday, April 12, 2004 11:10 PM

Subject: Re: I was in Duc Duc - March 29, 1971

 

Jack,
As far as news paper articles, there was an article on the AP wire from the LA Times that made it to the Baltimore Sun Paper.   I am from Baltimore, and my brother saw the article and read it to my parents.  You know one of those "Holy Smokes" kinds of moments.  I no longer have that article, but I'm sure it is in the L A Times archives.
 
I was sent to Duc Duc in late January 1971 to be the "Senior NCO of the Marine Liaison Team."  The team consisted of me, the new guy, two Marine Lance Corporals, who had been there for a while, and really could have done everything that needed to be done by themselves.  

 

I lived in a little hooch just to the right of where the U.S. Army put a generator on the river side of the compound North (?).  Right behind the building that had "Quan Duc Duc" on it. 

 

I read the account that the Marine helicopter pilots wrote that is on your website.  That was the first I knew about the boats and the NVA battalions.  I was told later by the Army Intelligence Captain, who was part of Advisory Team 15, that it was elements of the T-89th and 90th Sapper Battalions that had hit us.  

 

We had been getting shelled on a fairly regular basis, but nothing super-heavy.  I was in the main bunker listening to RFVN about 0230-0300 hrs and they were just reporting that Lt. Calley had been sentenced.  We started taking pretty heavy mortar fire.  It hit the bunker that I was in and the building behind it.  The second mortar round that hit the building took out most of our medical supplies, including the IV bottles.   A Rocket-Propelled-Grenade (RPG) hit the chain link fence that the Army had put outside the bunkers for just this purpose, but the explosion still pushed through the bunker wall and I got hit in the head with a PRC Radio that I was trying to talk on.   We were on the radio pretty quick and found out that the Viet Cong terrorists were hitting several places all at once; so the cavalry so to speak, was spread thin.  

 

A mortar round hit the roof of the bunker and the ply board ceiling came down.  The Vietnamese Commanding Officer, Major Chin, came in very excited and yelled  "VC in compound."   An American Army Officer and I took an M-60 machine-gun and headed for another bunker.  We could see that most of the bunkers below us on the west side of the compound had been satchel charged and were gone.  We opened up with the M-60 just to let the Viet Cong know we were there and they  promptly returned the favor and wounded the Army Officer in the arm.  We could hear explosions all over, but I could not see what was happening on the village side of the perimeter.  We were the only folks on the west side of the defensive perimeter for a while, and finally a Vietnamese machine gunner came over and opened up on our side with us. 

 

After what seemed like an eternity, black hammer helicopters showed up and began to lay down some fire and things began to calm down on the west side of the perimeter.   When the sun came up, I was able to get over to the south side towards the former 5th Marine Base at An Hoa and could see that the village was a wreck.  The hooches were mostly burned down and there was a VC flag flying over the big blue building.   There were a few houses left, which were very close to the road that went from the compound out towards An Hoa. 

 

We had helicopter support and they were shooting and buzzing around the village.  Some of the South Vietnamese troops moved out to take back the village areas that the Viet Cong terrorists were still holding.  

 

We began trying to evacuate the wounded.  I can't tell you how many wounded there were, but they were being taken out on Ch-46 helicopters.  Old Vietnamese and young Vietnamese kept coming out of their burned village.  The sight that will always stick in my mind was a little two or three year old boy lying on the ground with a huge bandage around his little head and it was soaked with blood.  His eyes looked up at me and they were going back and forth like a metronome.  We were evacuating wounded villagers as fast as possible, but more would come. 

 

An old Vietnamese peasant was being carried on a bloody sheet by his family, little kids and some women.  There was a lot of blood and death and destruction all around. 

 

I couldn't figure out what the terrorists' military objective was.  The Viet Cong put up a flag in the village and they hammered us, but they must have known they weren't going to be able to hold it.  We had a lot of dead in the compound and in the village.  Most of the village was gone, and I don't know how many villagers were casualties.  We got their flag from the village and weapons from 33 KIA's.  It took several days of evacuating wounded and picking up bodies.  My ears rang for more than a day.  They had to send in a Navy ordinance disposal team to pick up all the unexploded grenades etc. that were lying around from an ammo bunker they blew up. 

 

The U.S. Army Officer, who was wounded, received a Purple Heart and I think may have been recommended for a Silver Star. (He had only 13 days to go on his tour.)   I was put in for a Bronze Star by the same Army Officer (The Army was easily impressed by Marines.) 

 

The Marine Corps sent in a lot of wood and tin to rebuild the village.  About two weeks later, I was pulled out of Duc Duc and I was sent to Hill 37.  After that I was sent to Hill 42 and eventually was sent home.    

--------------------

 

I don't know for sure why they hit the village, but it seemed unnecessary to me.   Most of what was there was destroyed.

 

The Army advisor Team members were:  CO Major Trapnell, he was from near Baltimore too.  A Staff Sergeant, who was born in London England, named Wallon.  The District Intelligence Officer was Capt. Brian Walls.  (I ran into him just a day after we got back to the states at BWI airport.)  Staff Sergeant Malcom Campbell was from Hagerstown Md.   Major Trapnell still lives in Towson, Md. (I think.) 

 

That is all of the American Team, who I can recall.

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See A Current Satellite Picture And MAP of the site of the Duc Duc Resettlment Village Massacre.
 
 
 

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AN  UNKNOWN  PIECE  OF  HISTORY  FROM  THE  VIETNAM  WAR.
(A great topic for a history term paper.)
 
The Vietnamese communists must have felt there would be a reaction in America.   Even during the Vietnam War, a massacre of hundreds and hundreds of peasant men, women and children would trigger a negative response.
 
The Vietnamese communists were taking a big chance that such a massacre could turn the American People against them.

http://www.capveterans.com/the_duc_duc_resettlement_village/id7.html

 
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WHETHER  INTENTIONAL  OR  NOT...
 
 
Back in April 1971, as John Kerry was appearing on television talk shows around America condemning his brother and sister Vietnam vets for being Baby-Killers and Village-Burners, he was helping cover up the Duc Duc Refugee Village Massacre.   Learn the details at:

WHAT DID JANE FONDA REALLY DO (In Short)
 
 
JANE FONDA AND JOHN KERRY WORKING FOR AMERICA'S ENEMY TOGETHER
 
 
A MESSAGE FROM JANE FONDA ABOUT HER VIETNAM TRIP
 
 
I might be pissing in the wind, but I have to do something...   Please press the link:   
 
 

 
TODAY'S  BRAVE  AND  HONORABLE  MILITARY  IS  TOMORROW'S  VETERANS
 
Is it fair that the Federal and State's Governments turn their backs on Veterans, when they ask for Equal Rights... 

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The below New Jersey Herald News Article is about the Duc Duc Resettlement Village.
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A  PIECE  OF  FORGOTTEN  AMERICAN  HISTORY
 
THE  BATTLE  OF  MINISINK.
 
 
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FOR  THOSE  OF  YOU  WHO  BELIEVE  THAT  JANE FONDA  IS  A  NATIONAL  HERO,  AND  FOR  THOSE  OF  YOU  WHO DON'T  BELIEVE  SHE  IS,  PLEASE  PRESS  THE  BELOW  LINK:
 

 

 
----- Original Message -----
 
Check out the Viet-Myths website.  We're another group working on trying to get the truth out on the Vietnam War. 
            Regards,
           Mike Benge,
     Former VN POW '68-73
 
 
 

Examining the Myths of the Vietnam War

A Conference,
under the auspices of The RADIX Foundation,
which took place at Simmons College,
300 The Fenway, Boston MA, 26-29 July 2004


"The Vietnam War was mis-reported by the Media, mis-recorded by the Historians, mis-taught in our schools and mis-applied in addressing policy decisions.
MMMM should replace UUUU as our recognition symbol."
 

Stephen Sherman

http://www.viet-myths.net/OSession01.htm

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It wasn't Jane's fault.   It was because her former husbands made her do it.
(SHE  MUST  BE  TRYING  TO  MAKE  A  COMEBACK.
SHE THINKS AMERICANS ARE STUPID...)
 
 

DISNEY made it big on good, moral, honorable, American family stories.  It's when DISNEY changed their format that the Corporation started having problems.

Wal-Mart made it big;  because they advertised everything sold in the store was American-Made.

Boy, how things change!!

    Jack   http://www.CapVeterans.com 

READ  JACK'S  DUC DUC  EXPERIENCES  AT:  http://www.CapVeterans.com
 
 

The Last Americans, Who Lived In Duc Duc
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The Last Americans, Who Lived In Duc Duc

CAP  2-9-2 / NOVEMBER  3 

 
Pictures of the Duc Duc Resettlement Village and More Details of the Attack at:   http://home.earthlink.net/~ducducvietnamfriends 
 
Additional Pictures of the Duc Duc Resettlement Village at:  http://home.earthlink.net/~vietnamwar
 
 

 
Surrender Was Not An Option

      
Help Democracy grow in Iraq.  Be part of the solution...   Support Civil Action Programs in Iraq.     Press here to learn about one such Civil Action Program.   Local Heroes in a Foreign War.
 
             Jack_Cunningham

 

Local Heroes

December 20, 2004
By Andrew Borene

"I think that there is no greater gift than for a man
to be willing to risk his life for the freedom of strangers."


Op-Ed Contributor: Local Heroes

December 20, 2004
By ANDREW BORENE

Minneapolis - IF the Pentagon hopes to start bringing American troops home from Iraq while also increasing security there, it will have to find a way to do more with less. One approach could be expanding the Marine Corps combined-action program, an initiative that was successful in Vietnam and has shown early promise in Iraq.

The concept behind the program is that if American and foreign troops operate together, each will gain knowledge from the other as to the best way to counter an insurgency. In Vietnam, platoons were created that combined marines and Vietnamese militia members. The Americans were handpicked, chosen because they had shown particular respect for the local culture. They were expected to live in the villages they were assigned to defend, striving to "work themselves out of a job" by training their Vietnamese counterparts in police work and security operations.

The most striking success of the program was a rapid increase in actionable intelligence. Living in Vietnamese hamlets for months, the marines got a chance to get to know the locals, who in general had kept a careful neutrality in the war. This helped to humanize the American presence and reduced the passive support many civilians had been giving to Vietcong guerrillas. For many, their respect for (or fear of) the communist guerrillas waned, and they broke their silence about intelligence leads.

In the long run, it was one of the few efforts that managed to win some "hearts and minds" in Vietnam. Unfortunately, the top brass lost interest in the program in the early 1970's and, well, the rest is history.

Last year, under the leadership of Gen. James Mattis, members of the First Marine Division in western Iraq began adapting the program to aid poorly trained Iraqi National Guard and police forces. Although it is too soon to declare success, reports from the military and the news media suggest that Iraqis in the combined-action program perform better in combat, have higher morale and are considerably more reliable than their regular Iraqi military counterparts.

Expanding the program would be best accomplished by teaming coalition troops with Iraqi security troops, or even paramilitary groups as in Vietnam, and placing them in cities along the main supply routes. This would significantly bolster the coalition's ability to gauge popular sentiment and gather intelligence leads on the pursuit of enemy leaders. It would also reduce the high profile of the coalition forces.

While the situations in Vietnam and Iraq are not identical, when it comes to battling insurgents it is always vital to erase their advantages in popular support and local knowledge. A few good marines learned how to do that during Vietnam; perhaps trying it again in Iraq can bring about a different ending.

Andrew Borene, a law student at the University of Minnesota, was a first lieutenant with the Marine Expeditionary Force in Iraq. He is an adviser to Operation Truth, a veterans' advocacy group.

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http://www.CapVeterans.com