THINKING SKILLS OF LIBRARIANS



    Librarians can improve their thinking skills through strategically planned reading, writing and Internet researching! Your career success depends upon the quality of your communication skills - -- your reading, writing and speaking habits!

    In order to be successful in the professional public library environment and to survive personally in this big fascinatingly complex changing world, you must understand HOW YOUR BRAIN WORKS!

    To help you develop your intellectual and emotional knowledge and enhance your professional communication skills and abilities --- especially READING and WRITING --- use the following model to visualize how your brain works. Doing more reading and writing itself may produce more stress. But you can use your time wisely in creative pursuits to efficiently and effectively apply many new ideas to your work situation.

CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS

BRAIN AREAS ACTIVATED DURING READING AND WRITING


[1] LEARNING TO STUDY MORE EFFICIENTLY AND EFFECTIVELY


    PART 1 --- Brain Areas for Studying (Reading and Writing Skills):

  1. Primary visual and visual association areas. These areas of your brain perceive the sight of a word.

  2. Angular gyrus. The early stages of word interpretation occur here. This is where your visual stimulus is converted into its linguistic meaning.

  3. Wernicke's area. The full meaning of a written word is understood in this part of your brain. If you decide to write something, the words you use are conceived here.

  4. Broca's area. This area arranges the sequence of movements that you need in order to write anything.

  5. Motor cortex. From here, electro-chemical neural commands are sent to the muscles that you use for writing.

    PART 2 --- Memory Tips

    One of the best ways to efficiently think about how your memory works is to understand the phenomena of "PLANNED REPETITION." First, assume that your brain has "Four Layers:"

  6. LAYER ONE is for "short-term" memory. If there is no repetition, short-term memory is unreliable. Short-term memory is useful for many routine daily activities such as making phone calls or following directions immediately after they are given. It is used for activities that you don't need to remember very long.

  7. LAYER TWO is for slightly longer retention. If there is some repetition, then there is longer retention. The repetition of the information forces it from Layer One to Layer Two of your memory. This level of information is not very reliable.

  8. LAYER THREE represents fairly good retention. If you repeat the information several times and write it down, the act of writing itself creates a "visual" image for your mind to remember. You will have forced that information into Layer Three memory. Your muscles help you "remember" as you write, and your mind "sees" the information on paper again and takes another "picture" of it to "re-store" it in your mind or memory. This provides much longer retention of information than the first two layers of your memory.

  9. LAYER FOUR memory is used when you "force" the information you want to remember into your mind by repeatedly thinking about the material during a period of three to six days. Your conscious choice to repeatedly visualize and write down the information several times over a period of several days provides excellent retention.

Book source: (How to Study in High School)


[2] ACCELERATING LEARNING BY
UNDERSTANDING NEW FACTS ABOUT HOW YOUR BRAIN WORKS



    You can accelerate your learning by creating a pleasant, relaxed receptive state of mind and by "chunking" the new information that you want to learn in new ways that actively involve both your "left brain"and "right brain" (or the "left side" and "right side" of your brain)

    (Automated Brain Tutorial)

    Accelerated learning works by setting up memorable visual and aural associations in your mind that are simultaneously absorbed by BOTH the conscious and the unconscious parts of your brain! The amazing result and paradox is that you put in no more conscious effort than normal, but since you are relaxed, the new information is positioned so that it can be absorbed in a part of your brain that you can think of as being metaphorically like your "peripheral vision" when you see things with your eyes! This complex process will be explained in more detail in the future in "Your Amazing Brain Tutorial."

    Also, by using short and rhythmical sentences to "package" the new ideas or concepts that you want to learn, you can easily remember them.

    You can use this accelerated learning process to create new interesting associations among the facts" that you want to learn in a calm relaxed study environment. This creative "planned repetition" exercise of your brain "locks in" new information in your long-term memory.

Book Source (Accelerated Learning)


[3] MEMORY BIBLE ---
AN INNOVATIVE STRATEGY FOR KEEPING YOUR BRAIN YOUNG



    Memory training includes three basic skills: LOOK, SNAP, and CONNECT!

    LOOK, SNAP, and CONNECT --- the three essential memory training skills

      (1) LOOK --- Actively observe what you want to learn!

        Slow down, take notice, and focus on what you want to remember. Consciously absorb details and meaning from a new face, event or conversation.

      (2) SNAP --- Create mental "snapshots" of memories!

        Create a "mental snapshot" of the visual information you wish to remember. Add details to give the "snaps" personal meaning and make them easier to learn and recall later.

      (3) CONNECT --- Link your mental snapshots together!

        Associate the "images-to-be-remembered" in a chain, starting with the first image, which is associated with the second, the second with the third, and so forth. Be sure the first image helps you recall the reason for remembering the chain!

Book Source (Memory Bible)


[4] DOUBLING YOUR READING SPEED
BY INCREASING YOUR INSTANT MEMORY SKILLS


Book Source: (Double Your Brain Power)


[5] USING WRITING AS A CRITICAL THINKING SKILL TO CHANGE YOURSELF


    Good clear writing is "thinking on paper!"

    Regardless of the words you choose to use to refer to the reasoning part of the process of writing, such as "critical thinking" or "rational inquiry" or "reasoning for discovery" to describe the act of writing, it is still thinking directed toward the assessment and evaluation of things! In summary, thinking is analysis, which can be done either well or badly!

Book Source: (Thinking on Paper)



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