Dean Kay
The Dean's List
 Music, Copyright and New Technology in the News
From a Creator's Perspective
09/12/2014
  ____________________________________________________________________________
Tech companies and criminals have made billions supporting the illegal exploitation of our cultural past
while ruthlessly pursuing the dismantling of incentives creators need to fashion our cultural future


Off on business.  Back on the 22nd.

Sons of Anarchy’s Kurt Sutter Is A Rock Star for Creators Rights
The Trichordist -- We love Kurt Sutter’s unapologetic response to Google and Silicon Valley’s assault on creators. (This article contains) links to Kurt’s two editorials that are essential reading for all creators to understand what the “internet economy” means for artists of all disciplines.

For U2 and Apple, a Shrewd Marketing Partnership
By Ben Sisario -- U2 may be giving a new album away, but it is still getting paid. As part of what Timothy D. Cook, Apple’s chief executive, called “the largest album release of all time,” the company released U2’s new “Songs of Innocence” free through iTunes on Tuesday … For what Apple said were up to 500 million customers in 119 countries, “Songs of Innocence” simply appeared in their iTunes accounts on Tuesday afternoon. But the deal that led to that release was carefully negotiated between U2 and some of the most powerful entities in music …

A Concert For One
By Drew Haskins -- The advent of personal audio devices increasingly makes listening to music a concert for one, and the process of sharing and spreading albums and songs is becoming less prominent. Music continues to be shared publicly, of course, but in ways that maintain its confinement to the personal sphere. The way music is shared today is ultimately self-limiting.

iPod Classic Is Gone, But Fondly Remembered
By Joe Wilcox -- These days, like many other people, I listen to music on my smartphone. But I remember where it all began -- on an autumn day, not long before Halloween in 2001.

Amazon Cuts Struggling Phone’s Price to 99 Cents
By David Streitfeld -- Sixty thousand people vied to attend the unveiling of Amazon’s first smartphone in late June.  If only the retailer could persuade those fans — or anyone, really — to actually buy the device. The Amazon Fire is threatening to become the Amazon Fizzle.

The iPhone 6′s New Camera Could Forever Change Filmmaking
By Angela Watercutter -- Amidst all the hoopla over the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus and their motion processors, faster CPUs, and larger screens, it was also announced that Apple’s latest smartphones would have a much better camera. And while that’s great news for those looking to take less-wack selfies at the bar, the new video features that come along with it mean something else: a high-quality camera filmmakers—and those who aspire to be—can keep in their pockets.

Google Accord With Harvard Tie Fails Judge’s Smell Test
By Joel Rosenblatt -- Google Inc.’s settlement of a privacy lawsuit probably won’t win approval because it includes a donation to an Internet research center at Harvard University and to other schools that attorneys who brought the case attended, a judge said.

Google’s Illusion of Data Protection Security
By Scott Cleland -- While a well-positioned fašade of a castle can create the illusion of a fully-fortified castle, real people’s data requires more than the illusion of security; it requires real data-protection-security.  Google’s outsize ability to create the illusion of data-protection-security is particularly apt given that Eran Feigenbaum is Google Apps Security Director by day, and also a professional magician/illusionist by night.

When Does Cybercrime Become Internet Warfare?
Duane Morris LLP -- Cybercrime can go beyond having financial implications for victims …. Cybercrime can reach a point of constituting true Internet terrorism. … And the question arises as to whether a cyberattack initiated by one sovereign state against another constitutes war.

[Take that wine snobs!]
WhatWine Scans A Restaurant’s Wine List To Pair Your Dish With The Right One
By Steve O'Hear -- The newly-launched iOS app WhatWine uses OCR technology to let you scan a restaurant’s wine list and, coupled with wine database Snooth, pair the correct bottle of wine to the type of main dish you’ve ordered.

The Cyber PR Guide to Creating an Effective Music Marketing Plan
By Ariel Hyatt -- It completely baffles me that an artist will work so hard on an album, spending hours and hours writing songs and practicing these songs and then spending large sums of money recording, mixing and mastering, only to rush the release without being ready and having a complete plan in place.

Memorable Cars of Hollywood
Listal.com

9 New Rules For Making Music In Today's Online World
By Bobby Owsinski -- #9. First and foremost, it all starts with the song. If you can’t write a great song that appeals to even a small audience, none of the other things matter.

20 Best High School Music Videos
By Kenneth Partridge

Puff, The One Hit Wonder
True Music Facts Wednesday -- Lenny Lipton is a Cornell physics graduate in the class of 1962.  He is "recognized as the father of the electronic stereoscopic display industry," and "was the lead inventor of the current state-of-the-art technologies that enable today's theatrical filmmakers to project their feature films in 3D."  He holds over 50 patents … But to the world outside of 3-D tech and independent film (I guess that's pretty much the whole world when you round down), Lipton is most famous as a songwriter.  This is true even though he wrote only one song in his life, and did so inadvertently.

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