Textual corrections to "Liquid Tolkien" by David Bratman

This page includes textual corrections to the first printing of "Liquid Tolkien: Music, Tolkien, Middle-earth, and More Music" by David Bratman, in the book Middle-earth Minstrel: Essays on Music in Tolkien, edited by Bradford Lee Eden (Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 2010), p. 140-170.

Page 144, first full paragraph, lines 2-5:
Reads: Surely it should not be possible to read a mythological creation story in which the world is created through music, and then write that that music meant little to its author.
Should read: Surely it should not be possible to read a mythological creation story in which the world is created through music, and then write that the art of music meant little to its author.

Page 148, last paragraph, lines 1-2:
Reads: The major composer who most reminds listeners of Tolkien is the Finnish master, Jean Sibelius.
Should read: The major composer who most often reminds listeners of Tolkien is the Finnish master, Jean Sibelius.

Page 157, 2nd full paragraph, last line:
Reads: all of which have been set, and recorded, at least five times.
Should read: each of which has been set, and recorded, at least five times.

Page 158, second full paragraph, lines 4-9:
Reads: Brocelïandeís characteristic blend of Anglo-American folk with medieval and Renaissance style seems a perfect mixture for capturing Tolkienís spirit, especially the spirit of hobbits. And the melodies, many of them penned by the late fantasy author Marion Zimmer Bradley, and sung by her on occasion in the 1970s, are both sturdy and delightful.
Should read: Brocelïandeís characteristic blend of Anglo-American folk with medieval and Renaissance influences seems a perfect mixture for capturing Tolkienís spirit, especially the spirit of hobbits, though the Elvish songs are also beautiful. And the melodies, many of them penned by the late fantasy author Marion Zimmer Bradley, and sung by her on occasion in the 1960s and 1970s, are both sturdy and delightful.

Page 160, 1st full paragraph, lines 1-4:
Reads: The rock keyboardist Rick Wakemanís album Landscapes of Middle-earth alternates overdubbed synthesizers with a backbeat of noodling new-age piano music for the Elven lands and, strangely, Rohan.
Should read: The rock keyboardist Rick Wakemanís album Landscapes of Middle-earth consists largely of overdubbed synthesizers with a backbeat, while noodling new-age piano music represents the Elven lands and, strangely, Rohan.


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