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Families in Lowcountry South Carolina

Some groups of ancestors lived in lowcountry South Carolina, some of whom arrived in the colony in the late 1600s mainly from England and France, the French immigrants including several Huguenot families who arrivied after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV in 1685. The main families discussed on this page are:

The Cater family is covered on its own page.


Bohun
 
The Bohun family directly descends from an old Norman family, one of whom, Humphrey de Bohun, arrived in England with William the Conqueror during the Norman Conquest and was evidently close to William the Conqueror.  The Bohun family intermarried with English royalty.  Descendants of Edmund Bohun are also direct descendants of the following: Charlemagne, Alfred the Great, King Edward the Elder, King Edmund I, King Edgar I, King Ethelred the Unready, King Edward the Confessor, William the Conqueror, King Henry I, King Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, King John, King Henry III, King Edward I, King Edward II, King Edward III of England, and King Malcolm of Scotland. Henry de Bohun (1176-1220), the 1st earl of Hereford, was one of the signers of the Magna Carta.

Edmund Bohun (1644/5-1699)
Edmund Bohun was born on March 12, 1644/5 in Ringsfield, Suffolk, England.

He attended Queens College, Cambridge. While in England, he did some important translations and authored some books, including an autobiography that was not published until a private printing in 1853, edited by S. Wilton Rix (The Diary and Autobiography of Edmund Bohun, Esq. with an Introductory Memoir, Notes and Illustrations). 

In 1692, the monarchs, William and Mary, appointed him as licenser of the press, but Bohun encountered political problems related to censorship and remained in the position for only a few months.  He was imprisoned for a short period of time.  A rather unsympathetic account of Bohun and this matter is presented in volume IV of Thomas Babington Macaulay's The History Of England from the Accession of James II

In mid 1698, Bohun was appointed the first Chief Justice of the colony of South Carolina. Documents concerning him and his rulings are found in A. S. Salley, Jr.'s edition of Commissions and Instructions from the Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Public Officials of South Carolina 1685-1715 (1916).

Edmund Bohun died from yellow fever on October 5, 1699, within a year of his arrival in the colony.

He married Mary Brampton on July 26, 1669 in England.  She died in England in August 1719.

There is an entry on Edmund Bohun in Volume II of the Dictionary of National Biography, edited by Leslie Stephen and Sidney Lee, pp. 768-69.

Edmund Bohun is included in Gary Boyd Roberts, The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies Who Were Themselves Notable or Left Descendants Notable in American History (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004), pp. 182-83:

1.    Edward III, King of England, d. 1377 = Philippa of Hainault

2.    John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster = Blanche           2.    Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of
      Plantagenet                                                             Gloucester = Eleanor Bohun

3.    Elizabeth Plantagenet = John Holand,                    3.    Anne Plantagenet = William Bourchier,
      1st Duke of Exeter                                                    Count of Eu

4.    Constance Holand = Sir John Grey of Ruthin           4.    John Bourchier, Baron Berners  =
                                                                                  Margery Berners

5.    Alice Grey = Sir William Knyvett (Knevet)               5.    Sir Humphrey Bourchier = Elizabeth
                                                                                  Tilney

6.    Sir Edmund Knevet = Eleanor Tyrrell                      6.    John Bourchier, Baron Berners =
                                                                                  Catherine Howard

7.    Sir Edmund Knevet         =                                  7.    Joan Bourchier

8,    Elizabeth Knevet (sister of John) = Francis Bohun

9.    Nicholas Bohun = Audrey Coke

10.   Edmund Bohun = Dorothy Baxter

11.   Baxter Bohun = Margaret Lawrence

12.   Edmund Bohun, chief justice of S.C. = Mary Brampton   

See p. 183 of Roberts' volume for a complete listing of sources, the main one being the pedigree provided in Bohun's published diary and the attached pedigree.

 

Nicholas Bohun (1679-1718)
Nicholas Bohun, a son of Edmund Bohun and Mary Brampton, was born January 11, 1679/80 in England.  He married Margaret Bellinger in South Carolina around 1700.  Nicholas Bohun was a planter in Colleton Co., SC, living on land on the Ashepoo River that was willed from Edmund Bellinger to his daughter Margaret.

The following sale, dated 30 Dec. 1738, is recorded in Vol II 1740-1755, Books V--P-P of Clara A. Langley's South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772 (Easley: Southern Historical Press, 1984), p. 277.

RICHARD BAKER, planter, of Berkeley Co., to WILLIAM WEBB, planter, of Colleton Co., for £ 1500 currency, 500 a. Whereas Landgrave EDMUND BELLINGER owned 1000 a. at a place called Ashepoe, in Colleton Co., & by will gave his daughter MARGARET (late wife of NICHOLAS BOHUN, also deceased) the 1000 a.; & whereas she married NICHOLAS BOHUN & they had 2 daughters, MARY the elder, (afterwards wife of RICHARD BAKER, party hereto), & ELIZABETH (later wife of PETER GIRARDEAU), who inherited the land on the death of their mother, MARGARET; & whereas NICHOLAS BOHUN bequeathed to said 2 daughters, MARY & ELIZABETH, the 1000 a.; & whereas sometime later the land was divided into 2 equal parts & RICHARD BAKER & his wife MARY (she being the elder & having right of 1st choice) having chosen the E half, bounding N on Ashepoo River, on which NICHOLAS BOHUN'S dwelling house formerly stood; & whereas RICHARD & MARY had several children & after the death of his wife MARY, RICHARD BAKER by curtesie of England became tenant for life, the reversion being in WILLIAM BAKER, an infant, the eldest son, now aged 12 years; & whereas RICHARD BAKER for himself & eldest son WILLIAM, has agreed to sell the 500 a. to WILLIAM WEBB; now RICHARD conveys the land to WEBB; WILLIAM BAKER to confirm the sale when he becomes of age. Witnesses: JOSEPH ELLIOTT, JOSEPH ELLICOTT. Before RICHARD WRIGHT, J. P. WILLIAM HOPTON, Register.

The following is an abstract of Nicholas Bohun's will from Caroline T. Moore's edition of Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1670-1740 (1961):

Nicholas Bohun, Colleton County, planter, voyage to England intended. Daus: Mary and Elizabeth, all my land. Brother: Edmund Bohun. Exors: Capt. Christopher Wilkinson, Mr. John Palmer, Mr. Thomas Barnes. Wit: Tho. Fairchild, Wm. Loughton, Thomas Fairchild, Jr.
D: 17 May 1718. P: 21 Nov. __.  R: 25 Jan. 1722/3. p. 43.

Nicholas Bohun died in 1718 in South Carolina.

Mary Bohun
Mary Bohun, a daughter of Nicholas Bohun and Margaret Bellinger, was born in South Carolina in 1702.  She married Richard Baker on January 23, 1723.

She died in South Carolina in 1736.


Bellinger
The Bellinger family played a prominent role in 18th century South Carolina.  Edmund Bellinger, Sr., was a landgrave and this hereditary title was passed down several generations within his family. Landgraves were given their titles and baronies from the Lords Proprietors; the baronies themselves were 12,000 acres in size.

Edmund Bellinger  (d. about 1705)
Edmund Bellinger was the First Landgrave of Tombodly and Ashepoo Baronies in South Carolina, which were established in 1698. The Ashepoo Barony was granted on December 12, 1702 to Landgrave Edmund Bellinger: these 6000 acres on the southwest side of the Ashepoo River in St. Bartholomew's Parish in Colleton County.

For information on these baronies, see Henry A. M. Smith's chapters "Ashepoo Barony, from Vol. XV (1914) 63-72" and "The Tomotley Barony, from Vol. XV (1914) 63-72"  in The Baronies of South Carolina: Articles From The South Carolina Historical (and Genealogical) Magazine (Spartanburg, SC: The Reprint Company, 1988).

Charles H. Lesser's South Carolina Begins[:] The Records of a Proprietary Colony, 1663-1721 (Columbia: South Carolina Department of Archives, 1995) 437 contains the following:

Edmund Bellinger, a ship's captain from Westmoreland County, England, had been attorney general in the colony. He became a landgrave a month after he was commissioned surveyor general in March 1698. Bellinger would also serve as collector of customs and receiver and escheator.

According to these records Bellinger was commissioned as surveyor general on March 31, 1698 and served from 1698 until February 1703.

The following entry is from Agnes Leland Baldwin's First Settlers of South Carolina 1670-1700 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1985), p. 20:

Bellinger, Edmund (Esquire, Landgrave, Captain, Commander, Lord Proprietors' Deputy)
Arrived before 7 March 1689. Bellinger was commander of the ship Blake. His official positions were Surveyor General, Deputy Judge of the Admiralty, member of Commons House of Assembly, Receiver General, and "Deputy Governor" in 1699.

He was married to Sarah Cartwright.

The following Grant, dated 3 Jan. 1699, is recorded in Vol II 1740-1755, Books V--P-P of Clara A. Langley's South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1719-1772 (Easley: Southern Historical Press, 1984), p. 33:

By warrant dated 1 Aug. 1699, signed by Gov. JOSEPH BLAKE, EDMUND BELLINGER, Sur. Gen., laid out for himself on 6 Aug. 1699, 1 lot on E side of Charleston at E end of Cooper Street (marked B on model); bounding N on the wharf before ELIZABETH CLAPP'S land; S on BENJAMIN SCHENCKINGH'S wharf; W on "the Front Street" parallel with Cooper River upon the line of wharfage laid out by commissioners; E on low water mark. Whereas JOHN, Earl of Bath, Palatine; GEORGE, Lord Carteret; SIR JOHN COLLETON, Baronet; THOMAS AMY, ESQ. & WILLIAM THORNBURY, ESQ., Lords Proprs., on 16 Aug. 1798 authorized Gov. JOSEPH BLAKE, Landgrave JOSEPH MORTON, ROBERT DANIEL, JAMES MOORE, EDMUND BELLINGER, & JOHN ELY, ESQRS., or any 3 of them, to sell & grant land; now they grant CAPT. EDMUND BELLINGER 1 front town lot (B); he to erect & keep in repair a sufficient part of stairs or common landing place 8-1/2 ft. wide, with bolts, rings & posts for common use. Signed by ROBERT DANIEL, JOSEPH (Great Seal) BLAKE, JOSEPH MORTON. ROBERT AUSTIN, Pub. Reg.

The following is from Joseph Gaston Bulloch's A History and Genealogy of the Families of Bellinger and De Veaux and Other Families (Savannah: The Morning News Print, 1895), pp. 6-7:

This ancient family of South Carolina is descended from the Bellinghams of Bellingham, in Northumberland, in the days of William the Conqueror, and the Bellingers have kept their identity separate and distinct since 1475, when Walter Bellinger was created Ireland King at Arms and granted the following coats-of-arms, "Argent, a Saltire en grailed sable, entre four roses, Gules, or [sic]. Captain Sir Edmund Bellinger, of Westmoreland County, England, arrived in the Colony of Carolina and settled upon James Island in 1674.  He was in the Royal Navy and Commanded the ship Blake, in August 16, 1697, and was appointed Surveyor General for the two Carolinas, April 1, 1698, and created Landgrave May 7th, 1698.  He was also appointed Receiver of Land Rents August 14, 1700. He married about 1680, Sarah Cartwright, in England, and had the following children: [Thomas, Margaret, Edmund, John, Elizabeth, William, Lucia, and Ann]

The following entry for Edmund Bellinger is in Walter B. Edgar and N. Louise Bailey, Biographical Dictionary of the South Carolina House of Representatives Volume II The Commons House of Assembly 1692-1775 (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1977), pp. 72-73:

BELLINGER, EDMUND (d. 1705?). Father of EDMUND BELLINGER (d. 1739); grandfather of EDMUND BELLINGER (1719-1787); GEORGE BELLINGER (1724-1755?), STEPHEN BULL (1716-1770), and WILLIAM PALMER; father-in-law of BURNABY BULL and JOHN PALMER (d. 1744?).

    Edmund Bellinger, a ship's captain from Westmoreland County, England, settled in South Carolina by 1692, and in 1694 he was Attorney General of the province.  He was a member of the Second Assembly (1695) and represented Berkeley and Craven in the Third Assembly (1696-1697). Bellinger continued to follow the sea and in May 1696 he commanded the ship Blake bound for London. En route, the vessel was captured by the French and Bellinger was taken to France. He was in England in 1698 and was instrumental in getting the number of the articles of the Fundamental Constitutions reduced. On 1 April 1698 he was appointed Surveyor General for the Carolinas and on 7 May 1698 was created a landgrave. By 1700 he was the deputy for Thomas Amy, Collector of Customs, and deputy judge of the Court of Admiralty. NICHOLAS TROTT and others accused Bellinger, Governor Joseph Blake, and JOSEPH MORTON of seizing and condemning vessels and then purchasing them at auction for a fraction of their value. The Lords of Trade dismissed the formal complaint against Bellinger 29 May 1700. On 14 August 1700 he was named Receiver General of the Quit Rents. Among the other offices he held were commissioner, of pilotage (1694, 1702); commissioner, to make Sullivan's Island more remarkable to mariners (1700); commissioner, to hear complaints and appeals on tax assessments (1702); and commissioner, to repair fortifications (1702).

    As a landgrave, Bellinger was nominated 11 September 1700 to replace the deceased governor, Joseph Blake. JAMES MOORE and ROBERT DANIELL objected to Bellinger's nomination on the grounds that he was a proprietor's deputy and held several offices. When the ballot was taken, Bellinger received only a single vote. His being a dissenter and a "proprietor's man" had more to do with his defeat than the reasons advanced. He again fell victim to factional politics in 1703 following the withdrawal of the Colleton County delegation from the assembly. As a justice of the peace he attempted to quell the ensuing riot and in the process was caned by WILLIAM RHETT. Bellinger supported the dissenters' sending JOHN ASH (d. 1704) to London to plead their cause.

    Under his patent as landgrave, Bellinger was entitled to 48,000 acres of land. Ashepoo Barony, a tract of 7,260 acres was run out on the Ashepoo River and, apparently, was the only portion of the acreage that he claimed under his patent. However, he did take grants for an additional 2,054 acres in Berkeley County and 1,290 in Colleton. These lands and the patent passed first to his eldest son Thomas, who died without issue, and then to Edmund. Bellinger and Sarah Cartwright had six other children: Margaret (m. Nicholas Bohun), John, Elizabeth (m. John Palmer), William, Lucia (m. Barnaby Bull), and Ann (m. Richard Fairchild). The First Landgrave Edmund Bellinger died between 10 October 1705 when it is mentioned that he signed his will and 1 May 1708 when the Second Landgrave received two land grants.

    Second Assembly    Member                      1695
    Third Assembly        Berkeley and Craven    1696-1697

Margaret Bellinger (1680-about 1718)
Margaret Bellinger, a daughter of Edmund Bellinger and Sarah Cartwright, was born on January 1, 1680 in England. She married Nicholas Bohun, and they lived on land on the Ashepoo River willed to her by her father. They had two daughters, Mary and Elizabeth.

 

She died sometime before her husband created his will in 1718.

 


Baker
The Baker family was prominent in the Charleston area and established an indigo and rice plantation called Archdale Hall in the 1680s, about 14 miles from Charleston on Old Dorchester Rd on the north bank of the Ashley River.  Here is a Web site containing information about Archdale Hall ruins: http://south-carolina-plantations.com/dorchester/archdale-hall.html.  Click to see an article by Isabella G. Leland called "Archdale Hall[,] Legend Says Ghosts Arose on Dreadful Night of Quake" from the Charleston newspaper on August 7, 1960.

An informative article on the Baker family is Mabel L. Webber's "Baker Records[:]From copies owned by Mrs. J. Drayton Grimké," South Carolina Historical Magazine, 34, (1933), pp. 62-66; reprinted in South Carolina Genealogies[:] Articles From the South Carolina Historical (and Genealogical) Magazine (Spartanburg, SC: The Reprint Company, 1983), I, pp. 28-32.

Richard Baker (-1698)
Richard Baker came to the colony of South Carolina in 1680 from Barbados. At one point he was a member of the Assembly and an assistant judge.  His plantation was called Archdale Hall and was from a land grant from Charles II, King of England to Richard Baker.

The following entry is from Agnes Leland Baldwin's First Settlers of South Carolina 1670-1700 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1985), p. 11:

Baker, Richard (Esquire, Assistant Judge)
Arrived before 22 July 1692 with Edward, William, Richard, Jane, Hannah, and Elizabeth Baker. Was a member of Commons House of Assembly. There may have been two Richard Bakers here at this time, or Baker may have arrived in 1681 alone then returned with his family in 1694.

The following entry for Richard Baker is in Walter B. Edgar and N. Louise Bailey, Biographical Dictionary of the South Carolina House of Representatives Volume II The Commons House of Assembly 1692-1775 (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1977), p. 46:

BAKER, RICHARD (d. 1698). Father of WILLIAM BAKER; grandfather of RICHARD BAKER (d. 1752) and JOSEPH CANTEY (d. 1763); father-in-law of WILLIAM CANTEY.

Richard Baker immigrated to South Carolina from Barbados. On 23 March 1681 he received a grant for 297 acres on the Ashley River. This grant was confirmed 12 May 1697, and on the same day he was granted another 400 acres on the Ashley. He was elected to the Third Assembly (1696-1697) from Berkeley and Craven and served one term. He and his wife Elizabeth had seven children: William, Edward, John, Elizabeth, Richard, Jane (m. William Cantey), and Hannah (m. John Palmer). Richard Baker died between 28 January 1698 when he signed his will and 24 July 1698 when it was proved.

    Third Assembly    Berkeley and Craven    1696-1697

He was married to Elizabeth Wilson (1630-1734). The following death notice for Elizabeth Wilson is reprinted in A. S. Salley's Death Notices in the South-Carolina Gazette 1732-1775:

On Saturday, Aug. 13, 1734 (Tuesday) died near Ashley River in the 104th year of her age, Mrs. Elizabeth Baker, her maiden name was Elizabeth Wilson, she was born in a town called Chirton, (Wiltshire Co.) the 18th day of Oct. 1630; she lived in England 27 years, in Barbadoes 23, and in Carolina 54 years. She had 12 children, two of them being alive yet; 25 Grand children and 43 great grand children, and the same day she died one of her great grand daughters, the spouse of Col. Latimer, was delivered of a child.

The following is an abstract of Richard Baker's will from Caroline T. Moore's edition of Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1670-1740 (1961):

Richard Baker, Esq. Wife: Elizabeth, executrix. Sons: Edward, "this house and plantation," and other lands; William and John. Dau: Elizabeth, cattle numbered with those my son Richard Baker left her. Sons-in-law: John Palmer and Wm. Canty. Wit: Wm. Canty, James Hulbert, Wm. Baker, Edward Baker.
D: 28 Jan. 1697/8. P: 24 July 1698. R: nd. p. 68. 1851

Richard Baker died in 1698 in South Carolina.

William Baker (-about 1718)
William Baker was a son of Richard Baker and Elizabeth Wilson. He was married to Susannah Rowsham, who was born about 1680.

The following entry for Richard Baker is in Walter B. Edgar and N. Louise Bailey, Biographical Dictionary of the South Carolina House of Representatives Volume II The Commons House of Assembly 1692-1775 (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1977), p. 48:

BAKER, WILLIAM (d. 1718). Son of RICHARD BAKER (d. 1698); father of RICHARD BAKER (d. 1752); grandfather of RICHARD BOHUN BAKER; father-in-law of EDMUND BELLINGER (d. 1739); brother-in-law of WILLIAM CANTEY.

    William Baker was the son of Richard Baker, the immigrant, and his wife Elizabeth. He represented Berkeley and Craven counties in the Fifth Assembly (1700-1702), served Berkeley County as a tax inquirer (1703), and was a member of the Ninth Assembly (1707). In 1709 he received a grant for 500 acres on Combahee Island and in 1711 he received another for 318 acres on the Ashley River. He married Susannah Rowsham and they had four children, two of whom were Richard and Elizabeth (m. Edmund Bellinger). Richard Baker died in 1718 without a will and the property on the Ashley passed to his son Richard.

    Fifth Assembly    Berkeley and Craven    1700-1702
    Ninth Assembly    Member                    1707

William Baker died about 1718. He is buried in St. George Parish, Dorchester Co., SC.

Richard Baker (about 1703-1752)
Richard Baker, a son of William Baker and Susannah Rowsham, was born about 1703 in South Carolina. He was a planter in St. George's Parish in Berkeley Co., SC.

He was married first to Mary Bohun on January 23, 1723.

He married second to Mary Cater Quarterman on July 25, 1738.  His third wife was Sarah Fowler, as mentioned in his will.

The following entry for Richard Baker is in Walter B. Edgar and N. Louise Bailey, Biographical Dictionary of the South Carolina House of Representatives Volume II The Commons House of Assembly 1692-1775 (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1977), p. 46:

BAKER, RICHARD (d. 1752). Father of RICHARD BOHUN BAKER; son of WILLIAM BAKER; grandson of RICHARD BAKER (d. 1698); brother-in-law of EDMUND BELLINGER (d. 1739).

    Richard Baker, Ashley River planter, was the son of William Baker and Susannah Rowsham. He married first Mary Bohun, daughter of Nicholas Bohun and Margaret Bellinger, on 23 January 1723, and they had six children: William, Elizabeth (m. Josiah Pendarvis), Mary (m. William Logan), Susannah (m. Thomas Cater), Margaret (m. Thomas Bulline), and Richard Bohun. Mary Bohun Baker died in 1736 a few weeks after the birth of her sixth child. On 25 July 1738 Baker wed Mary Quarterman. They had three daughters: Ann (m. John Bulline), Rebecca (m. James Brisbane), and Hester (m. 1st Thomas Baker, 2d William Bellamy). His third wife was Sarah Fowler by whom he had no issue.

    Baker kept his family records in his copy of Matthew Poole's Annotations Upon the Holy Bible.  He was a Baptist and a member of the Ashley River Congregation. He bequeathed £250 to the trustees of the congregation for a "Perpetual fund for and towards the support of the Gospel Ministry among that Christian Congregation of People meeting together to Worship God on the Northeast side of Ashley River who by profession are Antepedo Baptists denying Arminyanism and owning the Doctrine of Original Sin Personal Creation and final Preservance. . . . Provided always that . . . such Minister hold Profess Preach and Defend the afordsaid Doctrines. . . ." The phraseology of the bequest bears the imprint of the preaching of Rev. Isaac Chanler (d. 1749), one of George Whitefield's disciples, who for many years had served the Ashley River Congregation and had written The Doctrine of Glorious Grace Unfolded, Defended, and Practically Improved in which he defended election and predestination while denouncing Arminianism and Socinianism. Chanler's meeting house was not too far from Archdale Hall, Baker's residence. In addition, Baker owned 300 acres on Jack's Savannah, 200 acres called Old Cow Savannah, and 540 acres on Cooper River in St. James Goose Creek Parish.

    He served his home parish of St. George Dorchester as Commissioner of the High Roads (1721); bridge commissioner (1722); road commissioner (1736); and tax inquirer and collector (1736). The parish elected him to the Seventeenth Royal Assembly (1748), but he declined to serve. Baker also was a captain in the local militia (1736-1752). On 16 July 1752 Richard Baker was shot and killed by JOSEPH BUTLER of Granville County. The real and personal property of the deceased was divided among his numerous progeny, but in December 1752 his widow ordered the chattels belong to the estate sold at public auction.

    Seventeenth Royal Assembly    St. George Dorchester    1748

Richard Baker died on May 31, 1752, perhaps the result of a duel.

The following is an abstract of Richard Baker's will from Caroline T. Moore's edition of Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1740-1760 (1964):

Richard Baker, St. George's Parish, Dorchester, Berkeley County, planter. Wives: Sarah, alias Fowler, one room in my house at Ashley River during her widowhood; 1st Mary Bohun, deceased. Sons: eldest William, deceased; Richard, under 21 years, plantation on Ashley River where I now live, land at Jack Savanna, all my right and title to land belonging to my brother Josiah, deceased, called Cow Savanna. Daus: Margaret, Ann, Rebecca, and Esther, all under 21 years. Grandsons: Richard Pendarvis; George Logan, one-half land on Cooper River in St. James' Parish, Goose Creek; Thomas Cater, under 21 years. Granddaus: Mary Pendarvis and Mary Cater, under 21 years. Mentions: other half Cooper River land to be divided among my said daus; William Webb of Ashepoo, Colleton County; Nicholas Bohun, deceased, and my 1st wife Mary Bohun, deceased; to Richard Bedon, Peter May, Thomas Bulline, Sr., Charles Baker, William Maine, John Bulline, son of Thomas, John Norman, Josiah Pendarvis, Elihu Baker, James Baker, and Thomas Cater in trust 250 [pounds] for perpetual fund for support of the "Gospel Ministry among that Christian Congregation of People meeting together to Worship God on the northeast side Ashley River who by profession are Antepedo Baptist. . . .;" Mr. Straighter. Exors: Henry Middleton, Esq., and William Maine. Wit: John Stephens, Elihu Baker, James Baker.
D: 20 May 1752. P: 1 Dec. 1752. R: nd. p. 41.

Susannah Baker (1731-1752)
Susannah Baker, a daughter of Richard Baker and Mary Bohun, was born April 6, 1731 in South Carolina.

She married Thomas Cater, a son of William Cater and his wife Mary.

She died January 8, 1752 in South Carolina.

 


Postell
The Postells (Potell) were French Huguenots who settled in South Carolina in the late 1600s. An informative article on the Postell family is William Dosite Postell's "Notes on the Postell Family," South Carolina Historical Magazine, 54, No. 1 (1953), pp. 48-53; reprinted in South Carolina Genealogies[:] Articles From the South Carolina Historical (and Genealogical) Magazine (Spartanburg, SC: The Reprint Company, 1983), III, pp. 311-316.

In her article "Huguenot Genealogy," (Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 93, (1988), p. 1-18), Virginia Gourdin says this about the Postells: [I]t's no wonder that the descendants of the émigré Jean Potell have had trouble with their lines: as "The Liste" reveals, he named two of his four sons for himself, and one can spend months trying to determine which is "Sr.," which "Jr." in the land records, and which wives and children belong to which of the three Jeans."  She provides the following information:

Jean Pôtell, his mother, Marie Brugnet Postell, and his sister, Marie Postell Laurens, certainly arrived before 1688, when he provided a 30-pound dowry for his sister, at her marriage to Jean Boisseau, with agreement that they leave plantations in Dorchester to two of his sons.  If he ever lived at Santee (as "The Liste" [17th century list of Huguenot immigrants] says), it may have been with a wife "Margaret," as an early Inventory for a "Margaret Postell" was filed (Packet O). However, Madeleine Pepin was the mother of his four sons (Jean, Pierre, Jacques, and Jean) all born in Carolina before 1696. Her father, Alexander Pepin, probably died "in his house on Broad Street" in 1688 (see S. C. Hist. Mag. Vol. 12, p. 227," Will of François Macaire") on the ¼ part of Lot 26 (the southeast corner of Broad and Church Streets) which he had bought on Dec. 16, 1688, and which he willed to his wife and son. In 1693, his son, Paul, sold an interest in this ¼ part of Lot 26, and the tenement on it, to his step-father Pierre Le Chevalier, the joiner, who had married the widow Madeleine Garillion Pepin, and who continued to live there after her death, leaving it, in his will, dated 1702, to his then wife Catherine. However, Paul Pepin had retained an interest in ¼ part of Lot 26 and, after his death, in 1699, it was held in trust for his only child until her death in 1712, at which time Jean Postell I, by then married to "Mary Ester," claimed it as heir of his earlier wife Madeleine Pepin and as father of her children. A will for Madeleine Postell (in Packet V,15) and an inventory for Paul Pepin (in Packet X), both filed before 1700, are now missing. As early as 1693, Jean Postell I had warr[a]nts for Lots 177 and 178 (on the south side of Broad Street between Orange and Legare) and may have built there and lived there, or within the walls, all his life. He did own land, before Apr. 10, 1695, on upper Goose Creek near Dorchester where his brother-in-law Jean Boisseau had settled and, in 1710, had a warrant for another 600 acres, but the early records do not tell us that he moved to Dorchester or affiliated with the Huguenot Church at Ladson. His second son, Pierre, may have been an invalid; a "Peter Pôtell," either son or grandson, was buried by St. Phillip's Church in 1729, the same year as Jean Postell I, perhaps because the Huguenot Church in Charleston had no pastor at that time (St. Philip's Register, 1720-1758. p. 40, 2 entries). No will was filed for Jean Postell I. By the early 1720's his three sons (John "Sr.," James, and John "Jr.") were established planters near Dorchester. John "Sr." (w. d. Sept. 10, 1745, pr. 1746, and Inv. submitted Jan. 1746, where filed in Packet 4R; copy in Misc. Recs, Vol. 67-B, p. 468, and Vol. 72-B, p. 544) married (Hannah?) and had John, James, Elijah, Benjamin, and two daughters; James (d. bef. Joseph Blake's w. d. 1750), married Judith and had Francis, Samuel, Jane, John, Elizabeth, and Magdalen (Samuel's w. d. Jan. 23, 1757, pr. 1757, Judith's w. d. Nov. 1, 1757, pr. Oct. 21, 1763, Inv. Oct. 27, 1764); and the youngest, John "Jr." (w. d. Feb. 26, 1732 in French, pr. Dec. 22, 1736, Inv. 1736, filed in Packets 3I and 3P) married, before 1725, Marguerite Poitevin, had Pierre, Magdalen, Mary, and Andrew, sold his plantation in Dorchester, and moved to Granville County, near his wife's relatives, before his death in 1736. (p. 7)

Jean Postell (-1729)
Jean Postell, a son of Nicholas Postell and Mary Brugnet, was born about 1660 in Dieppe, Normandy, France, according to the Register of Qualified Huguenot Ancestors of the National Huguenot Society, 4th edition, compiled by Arthur Louis Finnell, (Bloomington, MN: National Huguenot Society, 1995).  Several members of this family applied for English naturalization in South Carolina in 1697.

He married Madeleine Pepin, a daughter of Alexander Pepin (died 1688 in Charleston) and Madelaine Garillion.

The following entry is from Agnes Leland Baldwin's First Settlers of South Carolina 1670-1700 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1985), p. 190:

Potell, Jean
Arrived before 5 March 1688/89. A native of Diepe, he was the son of Nicholas Potell and Mary Brugnet. His wife was Madeleine Pepin. Their children, Jean, Pierre, Jacques, and Jean, were born in Carolina.

He died in South Carolina in October 1729.

John Postell, Jr. (-about 1735)
John Postell, the younger of Jean Postell's two sons named John, was born in the 1690s in Charleston.  He died about 1735.

In 1723 he married Margaret Poitevin, who died about 1751. In her will, she refers to her half brothers James and John as her brothers. The following is an abstract of Margaret Postell's will from Caroline T. Moore's edition of Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1740-1760 (1964), pp. 156-57:

Margaret Postell, Prince William's Parish, Granville County, widow. Son: Andrew, under 21 years. Day: Magdelin, under 21 years. Grandsons: John Gerardeau; James Gerardeau. Granddau: Mary Gerardeau. Brothers: James and John Deveaux. Sister: Magadane Garnier. Mentions: residue of estate to be divided between my son Andrew and my dau. Magdelin. Exors: Mr. John Garnier, Mr. James Deveaux, Mr. James Gerardeau. Wit: A. Deveaux, Sarah Deveaux, Mary Maxwell.
D: 1 Jan. 1751/2. P: 19 Aug. ____. R: nd. p. 33.

Andrew Postell (after 1731-1806)
Andrew Postell, a son of John Postell, Jr. and Margaret Poitevin, was born after 1731 in South Carolina.

In 1782, he was a member of the house of representatives for Prince William Parish.

According to the will of his Joshua McPherson, dated February 11, 1774, and the will of Joshua's father, James McPherson, dated September 28, 1765, Andrew Postell was married first to Susannah McPherson.

On June 18, 1785, he married Sarah Laird, who was the widow of Captain Ulysses McPherson. She was a daughter of John Laird and his wife Sarah.

The following deed abstract is in Brent H. Holcomb's South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1783-1788 (Columbia: SCMAR, 1996), p. 283:

V-5, 26-28: Lease and release. 10 & 11 Sept 1770, James Miles of St. Pauls Parish, Colleton County, Planter and Joanna his wife to Andrew Postell of Prince Williams Parish, planter, for £3200 SC money, 421½ acres. Jas Miles (LS), Joanna Miles (LS), Wit: Allen Miles, John Martin Kemmoner. Proved in Colleton County by the oath of Allen Miles before Andre Leitch, J.P., 13 Nov 1770. Recorded 27 May 1786.

In the 1790 federal census, Andrew Postell was living in Beaufort Co., SC.

In the 1800 federal census, Andrew Postell was living in Prince William's parish in Beaufort, SC.

The following entry is in Bobby Gilmer Moss' Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution:

Postell, Andrew
d. 11 April 1806
He served as captain of a troop of horse in Prince William's Parish during 1775.

The following entry for Andrew Postell is in N. Louise Bailey and Elizabeth Ivey Cooper, Biographical Dictionary of the South Carolina House of Representatives Volume III 1775-1790 (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1981), p. 573. This entry mistakenly names his first wife as the mother of children Sarah and Mary:

POSTELL, ANDREW. Brother-in-law of ISAAC MCPHERSON (1759-1787).

    Andrew Postell, son of John Postell, Jr. and Margaret Deveaux [sic] (d. 1752?), resided in Prince William Parish. According to a 1798 tax return, he owned 50 slaves and 1,195 acres near the Pocotaligo and Coosawhatchie rivers. Public service began for him in 1756 when he served in the Prince William militia. During the American Revolution, Postell was again in the militia, serving as a captain. Prince William elected him to the Fourth General Assembly (1782). He married Susannah McPherson, daughter of James McPherson (1688-1771) and Rachel Miles (b. 1700?). They were the parents of at least two children: Sarah McPherson (m. Thomas Miles Cater) and Mary (m. James Jervey). Andrew Postell died sometime after 1800 when he was listed in the federal census and before 21 January 1805 when a daughter married.

    Fourth General Assembly    Prince William    1782

Andrew Postell died on April 11, 1806 in South Carolina.

Sarah McPherson Postell (1786-1815)
Sarah McPherson Postell, a daughter of Andrew Postell and Sarah Laird, was born on March 23, 1786 in South Carolina.

On January 21, 1805 she married Thomas Miles Cater.  For more information on their children, see the material on Thomas Miles Cater.

She died on February 8, 1815.

The following information is abstracted in Digital Library on American Slavery, Petition 21381909, in Barnwell, SC,
Filing Court and Date: Equity, 1819-November-9 Ending Court and Date: Equity, 1821-June-12 :

Abstract: Col. James E. Macpherson, executor of the Sarah Postell estate, prays that Richard Johnson Jr. and Catharine Johnson Cater "account for the use and hire of the negro slaves which did belong to the said Sarah Postell in her lifetime." Macpherson points out that "no settlement of the lady's fortune was made" to Postell's daughter, Sarah Macpherson Postell, upon her marriage to Thomas Miles Cater because both Thomas and Sarah were "at the time of the marriage within the age of twenty one years." He notes, however, that "an informal partition was made, by which one half of the negro slaves were separated from the common stock for the use of the said Thomas M. Cater and his wife, until a further settlement of Testatrix's Estate should be made." He also cites that creditors tried to levy these said slaves when Thomas's "private Estate was entirely exhausted" due to his "embarrassed circumstances" whereupon Thomas did "declare that over this fund he had no control." Following the deaths of Thomas and Sarah, the petitioner charges that the executors of Thomas's estate intend to dispose of his "Estate in favor of the issue of his last marriage and his widow." He asks that the defendants be compelled to deliver to him the estate slaves in question.

For more information, see http://library.uncg.edu/slavery/details.aspx?pid=10908.


Pepin

Information about this family can be found in the Register of Qualified Huguenot Ancestors of the National Huguenot Society, 4th edition, compiled by Arthur Louis Finnell, (Bloomington, MN: National Huguenot Society, 1995), p. 194.

The following footnote is in Virginia Gourdin's "Madeleine Chardon, of Tours, Touraine and Her Family," Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 91, (1986), p. 104:

Alexander Pepin wrote his will in 1687 (not long after François Macaire had died in his house) and died in 1688, leaving a widow Madelaine Garillion, daughter of Israel Garillion and Suzanne Saunier, a son Paul and a daughter Madeleine. By 1696, his widow may have married their neighbor Pierre Le Chevallier; however, by 1702, Pierre had a wife Catherine, and, by 1712, a widow Catherine. . . .
By 1696, Alexander Pepin's daughter had four children by Jean Postell. Paul Pepin, a blacksmith, inherited one-fourth of Lot 26 (southeast corner of Church and Broad) from his father and, on Aug. 24, 1693, bought part of another lot; not yet married in 1696, he had died, intestate, by Dec. 18, 1699, when his wife Marianne, possibly a daughter of Humphrey Torguet, was appointed to administer his estate. . . .

Alexander Pepin (died 1688)
Alexander Pepin was a French Huguenot who moved his family to Charleston. He died in Charleston in 1688.  He was married to Madelaine Garillion, a daughter of Israel Garillion and Suzanne Saunier.

Alexander and Madelaine had two children: Paul and Madelaine. Madeleine married Jean Postell, Sr.

Madeleine Pepin (died before 1712)
Madeleine Pepin, a daughter of Alexander Pepin and Madelaine Garillion, was married to Jean Postell, Sr.


Poitevin

The following entry is in the Register of Qualified Huguenot Ancestors of the National Huguenot Society, 4th edition, compiled by Arthur Louis Finnell, (Bloomington, MN: National Huguenot Society, 1995), p. 199:

Antoine / Anthoney Poitevin
    son of Jacques & Jenne (Modemen) Poitevin
b. Oisemont, Provience de Gaule, France
d. bef 1703, Orange Quarter, SC
m. to Gabrielle Berou of Ormey in Bause; dau of Utrope and d'Adré LeProu Bérou
    Early settler of South Carolina
Children:
Antoine [Anthony] II; b[sic].c1708; m. to Margueritte de Bourdeaux, a native of de Grenoble in Dauphine; dau of Jacque and Madalenne (Garilian) de Bourdeaux. They had
Children:
    Anthony; d. 1731 without issue
    Magdalen; m. to ___ Garner
    Marguerite; m. to Jean Potell, Jr.
Pierre; had a son Anthony, who d. 1742 with issue
 

Anthoine Poitevin I ( - before 1703)
The following entry is from Agnes Leland Baldwin's First Settlers of South Carolina 1670-1700 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1985), p. 187:

Poideuin (Poitevin), Anthoine (elder) (Weaver)
Arrived before 6 October 1685. He was a native of Orsemont, Province of Gaule in France, son of Jacque Poiteuin and Jenn Modemen. His wife, Gabrielle Berou, was a native of Ormey in Bause, the daughter of Utrope Berou and Andree LeProu.

He and his wife Gabrielle Berou had two children, Antoine and Pierre.

Antoine Poitevin II (- about 1708)
Antoine Poitevin II, son of Anthoine Poitevin and Gabrielle Berou, was married to Marguerite de Bourdeaux.

The following entry is from Agnes Leland Baldwin's First Settlers of South Carolina 1670-1700 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1985), p. 187:

Poideuin (Poitevin), Anthoine (younger) (Weaver)
Arrived before 6 October 1685. He was native of Menthenon, Province of Gaule in France, son of Anthoinne Poideuin and Gabrielle Berou. His wife, Marguerite De Bourdos, was a native of Grenoble in Dofine, Province of France. She was the daughter of Jacque De Bourdos and Madelenne Garilian.

They had three children: Antoine Poitevin III, Magadalen (who married Jean Garnier), and Marguerite (who married Jean Postell, Jr.).

His widow, Marguerite, became the second wife of André DeVeaux on November 29, 1709.

Margaret Poitevin (-1752)
Margaret Poitevin, a daughter of Antoine Poitevin II and Margueritte de Bourdeaux, was married to John Postell, Jr. in 1723.

The following appears in Brent H. Holcomb's Petitions for Land From South Carolina Council Journals, Volume I: 1734/5-1748 (Columbia, SCMAR, 1996), p. 48: 

Meeting of Saturday the 3'd of July 1736. . . .
Read the Petition of Margaret Postel widdow praying a Warrant of Survey of 1450 acres of Land in virtue of her Family right sworn to by John Garnier in behalf of the said Margaret. Orderd That the prayer of the Petition be Granted the said Margaret proving to the Satisfaction of His Majestys Council that she Enjoys no Land in right of the number of persons mentioned in the above Petition.

In her will, she refers to her half brothers James and John as her brothers. The following is an abstract of Margaret Postell's will from Caroline T. Moore's edition of Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1740-1760 (1964), pp. 156-57:

Margaret Postell, Prince William's Parish, Granville County, widow. Son: Andrew, under 21 years. Day: Magdelin, under 21 years. Grandsons: John Gerardeau; James Gerardeau. Granddau: Mary Gerardeau. Brothers: James and John Deveaux. Sister: Magadane Garnier. Mentions: residue of estate to be divided between my son Andrew and my dau. Magdelin. Exors: Mr. John Garnier, Mr. James Deveaux, Mr. James Gerardeau. Wit: A. Deveaux, Sarah Deveaux, Mary Maxwell.
D: 1 Jan. 1751/2. P: 19 Aug. ____. R: nd. p. 33.

Using this will for information, many have concluded that Margaret's maiden name was Deveaux, but research has shown that Deveaux was the name of her step-father and that her maiden name was actually Poitevin.  Virginia Gourdin writes the following in her "Huguenot Genealogy," (Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 93, (1988), p. 1-18):

Marguerite Postell mentions her "beloved sister Magdaleine Garnier" and "beloved brothers James and John Deveaux," who were her half-brothers, but does not mention as a "brother" Andrew Deveaux II, a witness to her will, probably because he was a step-brother. Her brother Anthony Poitevin II, and her half-brother Israel DeVeaux had pre-deceased her. (p. 10)


de Bourdeaux

The following is in Register of Qualified Huguenot Ancestors of the National Huguenot Society, 4th edition, compiled by Arthur Louis Finnell, (Bloomington, MN: National Huguenot Society, 1995), pp. 35-36:

Jacque de Bourdeaux
b. 1630, Grenable, France
d. 8 Mar 1699, South Carolina
m. 1670 to Madeleine Garillond
    Emigrated in 1686 from Grenoble, Dophine, France to Charleston, SC and settled in St Thomas
    Parish
Children:
Marguerite; m. to Anthone Poitevin, II of Maintenon, France
Madeleine; m. to Daniel Brabant
Judith; m. Pierre Rover, II of Basle, Switzerland
Anthoine; b. bet 1686/96. SC; d. 1 Mar 1725; m. to Marianna de Bourdos

Jacques de Bourdeaux (1630-1699)
Jacques de Bourdeaux, son of Evremond de Bourdeaux and Catherine Fresne, emigrated from France to Charleston in 1686.  He was married to Madeleine Garillond.

The following entry is from Agnes Leland Baldwin's First Settlers of South Carolina 1670-1700 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1985), p. 68:

De Bourdeaux, Jacques (elder) (Mr., "Smith")
Arrived before 20 October 1692. Born in Grenoble as son of Evremond De Bourdeaux and Catherine Fresne. His wife was Madeleine Garillond. They had sons Anthoine, Jacques, and Israel De Bourdeaux born in Carolina.

The following footnote is in Virginia Gourdin's "Madeleine Chardon, of Tours, Touraine and Her Family," Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 91, (1986), p. 103-104:

Descendants of Jacques de Bourdeaux, 1630-1699, are often confused with those of Samuel du Bourdieu (whose three children were Philip, Samuel, and Judith), both important and quite different émigrés. When made a denizen, Apr. 15, 1687, Jacques, son of Evrimond de Bourdeaux and Catherine Fresné of Grenoble, had a wife Magdalen and four daughters; but he was already in Carolina, having bought, on Jan. 26, 1686/7, from Governor West, the eastern half of Town Lot No. 28, adjoining Jonas Bonhoste on the west and Madame Buretel on the north, on the north side of Broad (almost from the C & S Bank to the Peoples' Building). By 1693, he had acquired Lots 160, 161, 171, 172 and 173 outside the wall, but this is the entire west side of King Street, between Broad and Queen Streets with extensive "frontage" on three streets. In 1697 and 1698, he acquired 500 acres in two adjoining tracts and other property on Lynches and Wisboo Creeks, adjoining property of the Videaus, the Poitevins, and the Church of St. Denis, and may have taken his family there for the summers, as two of his daughters married Orange Quarter neighbors, Daniel Brabant and Antoine Poitevin, II. It is obvious that Jacques de Bourdeaux was not an "ordinary blacksmith," having arrived with assets and having quickly made a fortune in "city" real estate.

In 1696, "The Liste" shows his daughter Judith-Jane missing, but adds three sons, Anthoine, Jacques, and Israel, all born in Carolina. On Sept. 19, 1699, Jacques wrote his will (now missing) naming Jean-François Gignilliat and Peter La Salle as his executors, but, as both had died before his will was proved, on Dec. 20, 1699, his son-in-law Antoine Poitevin, II, was named administrator, his sons apparently minors. Magdalen de Bourdeaux died soon after her husband. At the property division, Feb. 24, 1708/9, when all children were of age, there were only four survivors, three daughters and one son: Magdalen, wife of Daniel Brabant, got the Lynches Creek and Wisboo property and sold it, in 1718, to Francis Paget; Anthoine got the eastern half of Lot 28 on Broad Street and he (and Marianne, perhaps Marianne Trezevant) sold it in 1709 and 1711 to Timothy Bellamy (who left it, in 1725, and the dwelling houses thereon, to his wife and daughter); perhaps Marguerite and Judith got the King Street property or accepted cash. There are many descendants of Marguerite by André Deveaux, I, and of Magdalen by Daniel Brabant, and of Judith (believed to have married Pierre Robert), as well as of Anthoine (died 1725) and his wife Marianne (died 1767 at age 79) who seem to have settled east of the Cooper River, perhaps on Daniel's Island, and left sons Anthony, James, Daniel, and Israel who called themselves "Bourdeaux."



Marguerite de Bourdeaux (-about 1709)
Marguerite de Bourdeaux, daughter of Jacques de Bourdeaux and Madeleine Garillion, was born in France and immigrated to Charleston with the rest of her family in 1686. Her first husband was Antoine Poitevin II.

After her first husband's death, Marguerite became the second wife of André DeVeaux on November 29, 1709. André DeVeaux had a son Andrew from his first marriage. Marguerite and André DeVeaux had three sons: James, John, and Israel. For more information, see Virginia Gourdin "Huguenot Genealogy," Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, No. 93, (1988), pp. 12-15.

 


Miles

An informative article on the Miles family is Rev. Robert E. H. Peeples' "A Miles Genealogy, A Family of South Carolina Planters," South Carolina Historical Magazine, 66, No. 4 (1965), pp. 229-40; reprinted in South Carolina Genealogies[:] Articles From the South Carolina Historical (and Genealogical) Magazine (Spartanburg, SC: The Reprint Company, 1983), III, pp. 158-69.

 
John Miles (about 1667-1722)
John Miles was born about 1667 in England. By December 31, 1694 he was living in South Carolina, when he was granted 140 acres of land, but he was probably living there by 1687, when his first son was born.

His wife's name was Mary.

He died in July 1722 in South Carolina and was buried in St. Andrew's Parish on July 28, 1722.

The following entry is from Agnes Leland Baldwin's First Settlers of South Carolina 1670-1700 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1985), p. 160:

Miles, John (Planter)
Arrived before 31 December 1694.

Thomas Miles, Sr. (about 1687-1756) 
Thomas Miles was born about 1687 in South Carolina.

He was a planter in St. Paul's Parish and was married to a woman named Mary (1687-1764).

By 1732, he had land grants in Colleton County totaling 2000 acres.

The following is an abstract of Thomas Miles Sr.'s will from Caroline T. Moore's edition of Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1740-1760 (1964):

Thomas Miles, Sr., St. Paul's Parish, planter. Wife. Mary, use of house where I now live during her life. Sons: John, tract in said parish next to Horse Savanna on on e side and Richard Stevens' land now in possession of John McQueen, tract on Wannel's Creek next to my brother Jeremiah Miles and north by brother William Miles; Thomas, plantation where he now lives next to Horse Savanna on one side and William Cattell on other, tract on "Satcatcher freshes" next to James Martin and on east by his brother William; William, tract next his brother Thomas on Horse Savanna, tract on "Salcatcher freshes" next to Mr. Wragg on south and vacant land on north; Silas, plantation where I now live at death of my wife, land on Wannel's Swamp next to William Bellinger and east on vacant land.  Daus: Elizabeth Ladson, land on Combahee Neck next to William Holman and Silas Wells and Benjamin Clifford; Margaret Hartley. Grandson: Richard Wickham [from codicil]. Grandaus: Elizabeth Coats; Martha Wickham; Elizabeth McPherson and Margaret Wickham [from codicil]. Mentions: residue of estate divided between said 6 children John, Thomas, William, Silas, Elizabeth Ladson, and Margaret Hartley. Exors: wife; 4 sons John, Thomas, William, and Silas. Wit: Andrew Fitch, Richard Baker, Louis Lafountain, Joseph Perry. D: 13 Oct. 1750. CODICIL. Mentions: son Silas; granddaus. Elizabeth McPherson and Margaret Wickham; grandson Richard Wickham. Wit: Thomas Ladson, William Day, James McPherson, Jr.
D: 21 Feb. 1756. P: 19 Mar. 1756. R: nd. p. 466.

He died February 21, 1756 and is buried at his plantation, Poplar Springs.

According to Rev. Peeples' article, Mary Miles' tombstone reads: "Here lieth the body of Mary Miles who departed this life 23 October 1764, age 77 years."

A genealogical correspondent provided me with the following transcriptions from the Miles' land:

Here Lieth the Body of
Thomas Miles, Senr.
Who Departed This Life
Feb. the 21st
1756
Aged 69 Years

Here Lieth
Mary Miles, Senr.
Who Died
Oct. 23, 1761

 James McPherson
Died 1793
[Tombstone Featured Face of an Angel]

 In Memory of Elizabeth,
The Virtuous and Amiable
Consort of
Isaac McPherson
Died March 22, 1775
Aged 31 Years

The following is an abstract of Mary Miles' will in Caroline T. Moore's Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1760-1784 (1969):

Mary Miles. St. Paul's Parish, Colleton County, widow. Sons: John and Silas; William, deceased. Dau: Margaret Williams, wife of Robert Williams. Granddaus: Amelia Ladson; Mary Miles. Mentions: residue of estate to dau. and sons John and Silas; estate of son William, deceased, for use of his heirs. Exors: sons John and Silas; son-in-law Robert Williams. Wit: Francis Thomas, John Tonge.
D: ___ ___ 1764. P: 8 Mar. 1765. R: nd. p. 473.

Mary Miles outlived her husband by about 12 years.

The following death notice is from A. S. Salley and Mabel L. Webber's compilation, Death Notices in The South Carolina Gazette 1732-1775 (Columbia: South Carolina Archives Department, 1954), p. 32:

On the 23d ult. died at Stono, aged 77 years, Mrs. Mary Miles, born in America, and who had lived 57 years in this province. Her husband, Mr. Thomas Miles, a native of this province, died 5 years ago, in the 71st year of his age.  The generation of this pair, was 9 children, 57 grandchildren, and 12 great-grandchildren, in all 79; all of which there now remain alive, 3 children, 23 grand-children, and 7 great-grand-children. (Monday, November 5, 1764.)

Rachel Miles (about 1700-after 1771)
Rachel Miles was born about 1700, a daughter of John Miles and his wife Mary. She married James McPherson. She died sometime after 1771, when her husband's will was proved.

Silas Miles (-1766)
Silas Miles, a son of Thomas Miles and his wife Mary, was a planter in St. Paul's Parish. He was married to his cousin Elizabeth McPherson, a daughter of James McPherson and Rachel Miles.

According to Rev. Peeples' article, he was a captain in the South Carolina militia.

The following appears in Brent H. Holcomb's Petitions for Land From South Carolina Council Journals, Volume V: 1757-1765 (Columbia, SCMAR, 1998), p. 77:

[Meeting of Tuesday A. M. 2 February 1762]
. . .
To certify elapsed Platts
. . .
Silas Miles    650 in Purrysburgh Township

The following appears in Brent H. Holcomb's Petitions for Land From South Carolina Council Journals, Volume V: 1757-1765 (Columbia, SCMAR, 1998), p. 248-9:

[Meeting of Wednesday 5 June 1765]
Pages 548-552: The following Petitions for a Warrants of Survey, to Prolong Warrants & Certifying Platts were presented & Read viz.
. . .
Silas Miles  100 D'o [on Waccamaw]

The following appears in Brent H. Holcomb's Petitions for Land From South Carolina Council Journals, Volume V: 1757-1765 (Columbia, SCMAR, 1996), p. 258:

[Meeting of Tuesday 6 August 1765]
Silas Miles    1000 on Waccamaw River notwithstanding a former Survey for James Sutherland

The following appears in Brent H. Holcomb's Petitions for Land From South Carolina Council Journals, Volume VI: 1766-1770 (Columbia, SCMAR, 1999), p. 258:

[Meeting of Tuesday 1 July 1766]
. . .
Silas Miles   1000 Waccamaw

The following is an abstract of Silas Miles' will from Caroline T. Moore's edition of Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1760-1784 (1969):

Silas Miles, St. Paul's Parish, planter. Wife: Elizabeth, living on my plantation during her widowhood. Daus: Ann, Rachael, Elizabeth and Susanna, under age. Mentions: if male child is born before my death to have plantation in said parish next John Miles and widow Miles, wife and daus. to have proceeds from sale of estate: Exors: wife; Charles Cantey; Jonathan Brake; Edward Grifiths; Peter Villepontoux. Wit: James Lingard, James Tonge, Thomas Fullalove, George Walker.
D: 11 July 1765. P: 12 Dec. 1766. R: nd. p. 612.

Silas Miles died on December 1, 1766 in South Carolina. The following death notice is from A. S. Salley and Mabel L. Webber's compilation, Death Notices in The South Carolina Gazette 1732-1775 (Columbia: South Carolina Archives Department, 1954), p. 2:

This morning died, Capt Silas Miles, of St. Paul's Parish. (Monday, Dec., 1, 1766)

Rachel Miles (1755-1802)
Rachel Miles, a daughter of Silas Miles and Elizabeth McPherson, was born on December 22, 1755 in South Carolina.

On February 18, 1773, she married Thomas Cater, son of Thomas Cater and Susannah Baker.

She died on January 30, 1802 in South Carolina. She and her husband are buried in the DuPont Cemetery on Haphazard Plantation Road in old Grahamville (now Ridgeland, Jasper Co., SC).


McPherson

James McPherson (about 1688-1771)
James McPherson was born about 1688, a date derived from his death notice.

He lived in Prince William's Parish.  He was renowned as an Indian fighter: he had several years of experience fighting in the Yemassee War (1715-1717) and was a commander of the South Carolina Rangers.  He was also involved in the construction of Fort Argyle in Georgia.  (See Daniel T. Elliott's "Argyle, Colonial Fort on the Ogeechee," published by the United States Department of Defense Legacy Resource Management Program as LAMAR Institute Publication Series Report 38 in January 1997.  Also see Bernard Fontaine's "The Origins of the Georgia Militia," Historical Society of the Georgia National Guard, Vol. 2, No. 4, Fall/Winter 1991-1992.)

James McPherson was married to Rachel Miles, a daughter of John Miles and his wife Mary.

The following appears in Brent H. Holcomb's Petitions for Land From South Carolina Council Journals, Volume I: 1734/5-1748 (Columbia, SCMAR, 1996), p. 158:

Page 369: Meeting of Wednesday Morning the 1st Decemb'r 1742
Read the Petition of James Mackpherson [McPherson] setting forth That he having 26 Persons in Family for whom he has as yet no warrant for running out land, prays that by virtue of such his Family right 500 acres may be alloted him in Granville County, St. Hellenas parish, bordering on the lands already possessed by the Petitioner, and the remaining 800 as soon as the Pet'r can find an unoccupied Tract of Land. On Considering the said Petition it was resoldv'd that Mr. Secretary do Issue out a Warrant for 1300 acres--whereof 500 to be contiguous to the Lands already possessed by the Petitioner.

The following appears in Brent H. Holcomb's Petitions for Land From South Carolina Council Journals, Volume III: 1752-1753 (Columbia, SCMAR, 1997), p. 195:

[Meeting of Tuesday A.M. 6 March 1753]
Page 302. . . .
The Petition of James McPherson humbly setting forth That your Petitioner being desirous of settling his son in Colleton County and having found a Plat of Land proper for his purpose, he now desires to take up the same. That he has fourteen negroes his property for whom not any Grant of Land has been assigned him, he prays to Lay out 700 acres of Land in Colleton County as aforesaid and that he may obtain a Grant for the same. Cha's Town, the 6th day of March 1753. Ja's McPherson. The prayer thereof was granted.

Page 303: The Petition of James McPherson humbly setting forth That the Petitioner being desirous of settling his second son and as yet is uncertain of the Plat where to get Land for him surveyed either in Carolina or Granville County. As he has ten negroes for whom not any Grant of Land, he prays to run out 500 acres of Land in Bartholomew's Parish, Colleton County and that a Grant may issue to him for the same. Cha's Town, the 6th day of March 1753. Ja's McPherson. The prayer thereof was granted.

The following appears in Brent H. Holcomb's Petitions for Land From South Carolina Council Journals, Volume V: 1757-1765 (Columbia, SCMAR, 1996), pp. 72-73:

[Meeting of Tuesday A.M. 6 October 1761]
Page 170: The following Petitions for Warrants of Survey of Land, Prolonging of Warrants and certifying Platts addressed to His Honour, were presented & Read Viz't
. . .
James McPherson     400 in Prince William's Parish

The following is an abstract of James McPherson's will from Caroline T. Moore's edition of Abstracts of the Wills of the State of South Carolina 1760-1784 (1969):

James McPherson, Prince William's Parish. Wife: Rachell, to live in my house during her life. Sons: John, deceased; James; Job, plantation where he now lives; Joshua, plantation once conveyed to son Isaac; Ulysses, land where I now live; Isaac. Daus: Keziah Perry; Elizabeth Miles, deceased, and her children; Susanna Postell. Grandchildren: John and Elizabeth McPherson, under age, children of son John, land where he lately lived.  Mentions: land purchased of Robert Cooper and Killpatrick; land sold by me to Sarah McPherson; land in Colleton County next Col. Blake where Rogerson formerly lived to be sold and proceeds divided among grandchildren; McKenzie's Vendue; residue of estate to wife and children of son John, deceased, children of dau. Elizabeth Miles, deceased, and my 6 children Joshua, Isaac, Susanna Postell, Job, Keziah, and Ulysses; land at Saltcher's sold for benefit of children of son John and dau. Elizabeth Miles, both deceased. Exors: sons Isaac and Job. Wit: Charles Browne, John Wells, William Haskins.
D: 28 Sept. 1765. P: 25 Mar. 1771. R: nd. p. 12.

He died March 6, 1771 in South Carolina. The following death notice is from A. S. Salley and Mabel L. Webber's compilation, Death Notices in The South Carolina Gazette 1732-1775 (Columbia: South Carolina Archives Department, 1954), p. 16:

On the 6th ult. died, at his Plantation in Prince William's Parish, aged 83 years, Captain James MacPherson, a Native of this Province, who in the first Indian War, and at several other periods since, served this Country with Honour and Reputation. As he was remarkable for his Honesty, Generosity and Humanity, and more particularly for his friendly disposition, so his Death is universally regretted. (Thursday, April 4, 1771)

Elizabeth McPherson (-before 1765)
Elizabeth McPherson, a daughter of James McPherson and Rachel Miles, was married to Silas Miles. She died before September 1765, when her father's will was written.


Laird

John Laird (-1761)
According to his will, John Laird and his wife had one child, Sarah.  In the 1761 will of Patrick Laird, John's brother, the father is identified as James Laird of Mugil [Meigle], Perth, which is in Scotland (Caroline T. Moore's Abstracts of Wills of the State of South Carolina 1760-1784 (1969), p. 17). There is a death record for a James Laird in Meigle for June 5, 1764.

The following is an abstract of John Laird's will in Caroline T. Moore's Abstracts of Wills of the State of South Carolina 1760-1784 (1969):

John Laird, St. Philip's Parish, Berkeley County. Dau: Sarah, residue of all estate. Brother: Patrick Laird. Exors: brother Patrick Laird; William Lennox; James Sharp; Philip Hext. Wit: Benjn. Caton, Brian Cape, Alexr. Russell.
D: 28 June 1761. P: 10 July 1761. R: nd. p. 97.

His wife was not mentioned, so she probably had already died.

According to D. E. Huger Smith and and A. S. Salley, Jr.'s Register of St. Philip’s Parish, Charles Town, or Charleston, S.C. 1754-1810 (rpt; Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1971), p. 297, John Laird was buried on July 2, 1761.

Sarah Laird (1751-1812)
Sarah Laird, a daughter of John Laird and his wife, was born on October 29, 1751 in Colleton County, South Carolina.

Her first husband was Captain Ulysses McPherson, a son of James McPherson and Rachel Miles. They married in June of 1770.

She may be the Sarah McPherson who petitioned for land in 1762. The following appears in Brent H. Holcomb's Petitions for Land From South Carolina Council Journals, Volume V: 1757-1765 (Columbia, SCMAR, 1996), p. 99:

[Meeting of Tuesday A.M. 7 December 1762]
. . .
Sarah McPherson     500 in Colleton County fronting land of the Petitioners

The following appears in Brent H. Holcomb's Petitions for Land From South Carolina Council Journals, Volume V: 1757-1765 (Columbia, SCMAR, 1996), p. 100:

[Meeting of Tuesday A.M. 7 December 1762]
. . .
Sarah McPherson     400 in Colleton County surveyed for Jas McPherson

Her second husband was Andrew Postell, whom she married on June 17, 1785.

She died April 23, 1812 in South Carolina. There is a death notice in the Charleston Times on April 28, 1812 that indicates she died "at the Horse-Shoe" (Brent H. Holcomb's Marriage and Death Notices from the (Charleston) Times, 1800-1821 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1979,), p. 261).