Since the creation of this web site, many other web sites have been created by other people with prosopagnosia. The following is a collection of these first-person accounts of living with prosopagnosia:

In addition, you may find the following web sites useful and/or interesting. Other than the brief outlines I describe here, I am not very familiar with most of them, so I can not vouch for how useful these links and/or organizations may be.


The Official Patient's Sourcebook on Agnosia The web site gives the following synopsis of this book: "A comprehensive manual for anyone interested in self-directed research on Agnosia. Fully referenced with ample Internet listings and glossary." A description of the book, a table of contents, an excerpt from the introduction, and a vocabulary list of words and phrases defined within the book is provided here. I should add that as of today's date, October 28, 2005, I have not read this book. Therefore, I can not provide any opinion or further information about it other than what is available on the web site itself. If that is enough to pique your interest, you can order the book The Official Patient's Sourcebook on Agnosia: A Revised and Updated Directory for the Internet Age from Amazon.com. You can also order "The Official Patient's Sourcebook on Agnosia: A Revised and Updated Directory for the Internet Age" from barnesandnoble.com
It is not terribly surprizing that some people find conditions like prosopagnosia ample material for writing fiction. After all, people with prosopagnosia can have quite a knack for encountering surprizes even in our everyday lives. Face Blind a novel of suspense by Raymond Benson. The person who brought this book to my attention wrote to me about it in e-mail, writing "The main character has PA (=prosopagnosia). I have read it, and I think the description of having PA is pretty good. What do you think?" I haven't read the book as of today's date, January 4, 2004, but the two preview chapters definitely look quite accurate to certain aspects of living with prosopagnosia. I plan on purchasing the book soon. I may have more to say about it once I've read it.

Please follow this link to purchase Face Blind from Amazon.com

Please follow this link to purchase Face Blind from barnesandnoble.com

UPDATE: January, 2007: I finally purchased and read this book. Its a fantastic read! The descriptions of the main character were exceptionally good as far as the psychological effects of living with prosopagnosia. It's clear that the author put in a tremendous amount of research and thought into this story. In describing prosopagnosia, little was left out, and a lot of accurately well-written fictional social accounts were given as to how having prosopagnosia can effect not just one's daily life, but also one's life in some most extraordinary circumstances. In fact, I enjoyed reading the book so much that I'd like to reccomend it for you to purchase. If you do choose to purchase this book, please follow the links above to do so as I get a small commission for each sale, but only for sales completed through following the links on this page.

From the nonfiction genre, Nancy Mindick has authored a book entitled "Understanding Facial Recognition Difficulties in Children: Prosopagnosia Management Strategies for Parents and Professionals (JKP Essentials)". In addition to being a great tool for parents, educators, and anybody who is interested in prosopagnosia, I am proud to write that I contributed the Foreward of this book and was also interviewed for it.

Please follow this link to purchase "Understanding Facial Recognition Difficulties in Children: Prosopagnosia Management Strategies for Parents and Professionals (JKP Essentials)" from Amazon.com

Because of my contributions to Nancy Mindick's book, I was invited by Psychology Today to blog about my experiences living with prosopagnosia.
I have also participated in helping out a number of people with projects related to prosopagnosia. One of these projects is a play written by Anna DeMers entitled Solo Face information about which can be found here. Additional production information about Solo Face can be found here.
The Boston Globe ran an article on prosopagnosia in their newspaper on June 14, 2006 which I assisted them with. You can read the article here.
CNN aired a segment which I assisted them with on February 6, 2007. There was a piece on their website as well as a video segment which you can view. It also made it onto "Paging Dr. Gupta Blog"