Jim practicing air guitar                   KFSR DJ REVIEW
                              JIM
      "BAREFOOT BOY WONDER"
                      CONNELLY

           (1962 NO SHOES RECORDS)

    Released in 1962, this DJ never ceases to amaze. The Boy Wonder revolves around the turntables of life at alternating speeds of 45 and 33 1/3 r.p.m. Jim begins his day every morning waking up a ½ hour before he goes to bed. After a couple Tootsie Rolls and slugs of milk, Jim is set for a day of barefoot excursions. If his voice is a common encounter on KFSR it's because Jim has no known home and is forced to live in the station's production studio.

Quote: "That album wasn't released in '78, it was released in '77, I should know, I bought it when it came out!!"

THE CUTTING EDGE

     We rag on MTV an awful lot, and deservedly so. But once a month, usually on the last Sunday, they run I.R.S. Records' "The Cutting Edge." Its a potpourri of what is going on in the outer fringes of Rock and Roll. It's the only show that takes for granted Punk and Post-Punk and lives up to the ideals of those movements. And it's very, very funny.
     Over the last year, they have had segments on The Alarm, R.E.M., X, UB40, and many others, ranging from talk shows discussing hardcore to Grandmaster Flash demonstrating scratching. "The Cutting Edge," the only thing that makes MTV worth having. Watch for it.

ALBUM REVIEWS INCLUDING ALBUMS THAT HAVE SYNTHESISERS ON THEM!!!!

James "Blood" Ulmer - Odyssey  (Columbia)      With just guitar, violin and drums, Ulmer manages to create music that is a mix of Rock and Jazz. Note: this is not "fusion" music that dilutes the power of Rock and Jazz, but rather something entirely new. On the instrumentals like "Love Dance" and "Election," Ulmer's guitars interweave with Charles Burnham's violin to create majestic, soaring jams. More down-to-earth, but no less interesting, are the vocal songs like "Little Red House" and "Are You Glad to Be in America?" where the violin acts like rhythm guitar. Incredible throughout.

-- Boy Wonder

Eurythmics - Touch  (RCA)      Transcending the mentality of your usual synth-pop, the Eurythmics have bettered themselves on this, their second U.S. release. Using a wide variety of instruments and production tactics, this album is enjoyable and still danceable. Top Tracks: "Right By Your Side," "Here Comes the Rain Again," and "No Fear, No Hate, No Pain."

-- Tim Gaskill

Mitchell Froom - The Key of Cool   (Slash)      As a soundtrack to the movie Cafe Flesh, this music proved to be perfect for a film that portrayed a desolate and disturbing post-nuke society. On its own, it retains many of the same mysterious qualities, but in addition, seems to take some kind of futuristic beat sound. If synthesiser music has a future (and it should, provided those producing excercise taste and restraint), this is it.

-- K.I.R.K.

Fred Frith - Cheap at ½ the Price   (Ralph)      I could get esoteric and go on about how Fred Frith's new LP has all the ingredients of a great album. Or how Mr. Frith's innovative musicianship and frenetic lyrics exemplifies or even transcends the "Ralph Label" sound. Let's just say that this album hurts bad.*
Best: "Cap the Knife," Same Old Me," and "Some Clouds Don't"

-- JDJ
*Fungus lingo for "great."

The Jim Carroll Band - I Write Your Name  (ATCO)      On Jim's 1980 debut Catholic Boy, much of the charm lay in the punky overdrive of his band. But on his 3rd album, Jim seems to be moving more towards the mainstream, sacrificing much of the energy of his earlier work. Even with Lenny Kaye (former Patti Smith guitarist) in his band, Carroll's new sound just isn't as appealing. Some of the songs are good, like "Love's A Crime," "No More Luxuries" and the remake of the Velvet Underground's "Sweet Jane," but after two disappointing albums, I'm beginning to figure that Carroll's just a one-shot. Too bad.

-- Boy Wonder

KEEP YOUR EARS PEELED FOR: The new Violent Femmes single: "Ugly," the album by The Smiths, and The Style Council album My Ever Changing Moods. And we're still waiting for records by Dream Syndicate, Go-Gos, Furs, Tom Verlaine, Cars, and many others.

NEXT TIME: The importance of The Alarm's Declaration to your life



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I was listening to The Who -- Out of Print (bootleg)