AMERICANS WHO LIVED AS PEASANTS
GREAT STORY
AMERICANS WHO LIVED WITH THE VIETNAMESE PEASANTS
FREE SPEECH OR THREAT ON THE PRESIDENT. PRESS HERE.
HONORABLE VETERAN MOCKED FOR HIS PTSD
Combined Action Program (CAP)
WAS THERE AN ATTEMPT TO COVERUP THE MASSACRE OF THE DUC DUC REFUGEE VILLAGE
CAP IN IRAQ
MONTAGNARDS THEIR HISTORY AND CULTURE
LETTER OF APOLOGY
WET T-SHIRT
GREAT STORY
THE SEVEN WONDERS OF THE WORLD
TO BUSY FOR A FRIEND
DID GEORGE BUSH LIE ABOUT SADDAM'S WMD...
UNITED WAR VETERANS COUNCIL
PICTURES FROM CAP 2 - 9 - 2 , THE DUC DUC RESETTLEMENT VILLAGE
AMERICANS LOVE OUR TROOPS
YOU CAN TELL A VET JUST BY LOOKING...
PROUDLY STANDING UP FOR THE FLAG
TWO OTHER CELEBRITIES WHO SUPPORT AMERICA'S VETERANS
NATIVE AMERICAN TALE ABOUT TWO WOLVES
THIS MEMORIAL DAY
EQUAL PROTECTION OF THE LAW
AMERICAN CELEBRITIES WHO REALLY DO CARE
HELP HOSPITALIZED VETERANS
MEMORAL DAY 2005: AMERICA's BRAVEST GENERATION IS PASSING
REAL AMERICAN VIETNAM VETERAN HEROES
TERRORISM
WHAT WE WON IN VIETNAM
GOD BLESS AMERICA
DEAR VIETNAM VETERAN, LOVE AMERICA
PICTURES OF A COMBINED ACTION PROGRAM (CAP) VILLAGE
MORE DETAILS OF THE COMBINED ACTION PROGRAM (CAP)
MORE DETAILS ABOUT GEORGE AND JACK'S VILLAGE EXPERIENCES
NEW JERSEY ATTORNEY ETHICS PROTECTS ONE OF THEIR VICE-CHAIRMAN
DO YOU FEEL THIS IS FAIR TREATMENT OF A HONORABLE VETERAN
PLACE ALL POLITICIANS ON SOCIAL SECURITY

Vietnam vet, guardian angel have unlikely reunion
You never know who you'll run into at the store

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/227797_vietnam09.html

By MIKE LEWIS
SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER

The Voice, a nasal tenor, an outside voice, started to whine like a concrete saw.

"We needed Jason's Toothpaste," The Voice explained recently, the pitch rising just shy of shrill. "Just think if we'd gone to a different store! Or if we hadn't seen our friends! We almost went to Fred Meyer instead!"

  Fisk and Binh
  Zoom Joshua Trujillo / P-I
  Wesley Fisk, left, a 63-year-old Vietnam veteran, and Thin Binh, 58, a former translator for Fisk, share a laugh at the Green Lake PCC grocery store yesterday. The pair accidentally reconnected at the co-op, where Binh works. Fisk was in a checkout line, and Binh recognized his voice.

Sandpaper, if it could, would talk like this. A drill, hearing it, might fall in love. The Voice stands in sharp relief to the elegant, sublime sounds Wesley Fisk, 63, can make with his hands and his Scoggins violin from his second chair in the Seattle Symphony.

But The Voice does have something going for it, something the hands can't claim. It is not easily ignored. Or forgotten. After dec-ades and divorce, after drinking and detention camps, after war and weight and wrinkles and thousands of miles and children and grandchildren, The Voice retained the power to reach into a shelved, shared past and yank it to the present.

"When I heard it," said Thin Binh, 58, recalling the day a few weeks ago in a North Seattle PCC grocery store, "I started thinking that this person is a friend of mine. But then I doubted it. I saw him, and I thought I must be wrong. It's been so long."

Binh set aside the groceries he'd been bagging for PCC's customers. He walked over to The Voice. Unnoticed, he waited for Fisk to finish his loud gabbing with the friends he and his wife had bumped into in the checkout line. Then he tugged on the man's sleeve. "I used my quiet voice," Binh remembered. "I said, 'Are you Fisk?' "

Fisk turned and looked. Seeing nothing in the face, his eyes scanned down to the small man's nametag. It said Thin.

Memory jolted him.

He screamed.

The bustling store went silent. He clutched Binh like he was hanging on in a hurricane.

Thirty-six years ago, an injured Sgt. Wesley Fisk, a medic in Vietnam, unexpectedly was airlifted home to Seattle. He had no time to grab his footlocker. He couldn't say goodbye to the man who had helped keep him alive for 11 months, the interpreter who for decades Fisk believed had been killed for helping the Americans after the communists took over for good in 1975.

"The first thing I heard was yelling and then, 'I know you! I know you!' " said Danyella McAllister, a checker at the Aurora Avenue store who was working a few feet away when the encounter happened. "The guy had such a grip on Thin. They almost hit the floor. It was clear they hadn't seen each other in a while. Then we heard it was since Vietnam.

"Everyone up front started crying."

In Fisk's home, weeks after the encounter, the men summed up their shock.

"I thought he was dead," Fisk explained.

Said Binh: "I did not know he lived in Seattle. I never thought I would see him again."

* * *

Fisk and Binh met in 1968 at Camp Enari near Pleiku City in Vietnam, an odd place to form a friendship between two men who never wanted to be soldiers.

  Fisk and Binh in Vietnam, 1968
  Zoom
  Wesley Fisk shakes a village chief's hand in September 1968. Thin Binh, Fisk's translator, approaches in the background with powdered milk.

Fisk was born in Seattle in 1941, one of two children. He began playing the violin at age 10 and immediately showed tremendous promise. In college in 1965, while majoring in violin, he joined the Seattle Symphony. When later that year he broke his wrist in a bicycle accident, he was forced to drop class units, relegating him to part-time student status.

He received his Vietnam draft notice 18 months later.

Thin (pronounced "tin") Binh was born in 1947 in the Vietnamese village of Duc Co. He is Jarai, one of a group of highland, ethnic minority tribes broadly termed Montagnards, a French word meaning highlander. In school, he studied French and English. He also learned Vietnamese and seven tribal tongues. Even so, he says, he never had any natural ear for language. "But I try hard. I do my best."

On summer break from college in Saigon, he took a job with the U.S. Special Forces as a translator and interpreter. It was 1965.

He wanted the job because he was worried about the communists. Plus, it paid well.

When Fisk received his draft notice, he wrote everyone he knew with any juice at all -- to no avail. In Houston, he trained to be a medic and soon ended up in the U.S. Army Medical Civic Action Program.

MEDCAP was a component of what has been loosely described as the Army's "hearts and minds" program. Through it, small teams of medics disbursed aid to remote villages, particularly those in strategic mountainous areas. The sutures, penicillin, cough medicine and powdered milk, it was thought, would lease enough goodwill that villagers would spill information about the area's hidden Viet Cong.

Fisk found himself stationed near the Cambodian border, at the war's edges and gray areas. He distributed aid. Other soldiers interviewed locals. Central to everything were the translators.

Convincing the villagers the Americans meant well wasn't easy. It required an understanding of the people. It required Binh.

"I was drawn to him on my first encounter," Fisk recalled. "We could talk to each other. He understood what we needed to do."

  Fisk, 1969
    Wesley Fisk
  In February 1969, Wesley Fisk, a 27-year-old medic in Vietnam, treats a Montagnard villager who had tuberculosis.

The men traveled together, village by village, to try to earn the trust of the hill tribes. When Fisk distributed penicillin, Binh was often next to him, explaining how the Americans wanted to help and what they wanted in return. Binh also did something Fisk only realized years later; he carefully steered the lightly armed medics away from hidden Viet Cong camps.

"We would go into villages and immediately he would start talking to people," Fisk said. "Then he would bring them over and know exactly what they needed. He was very thorough. He noticed everything."

Including things he didn't tell Fisk.

"I'm sure Binh saved my life on many occasions," Fisk said. "I have no doubt in my mind. In several cases, villages were overrun but only after we left. Too many times for coincidence."

* * *

For his part, Binh is measured when he speaks about the American war.

The Montagnards, Binh said, are peaceful, friendly people with a desire to be left alone in their rustic, hill-country villages. For decades, they had managed a calm, uneasy co-existence with the Vietnamese, who mostly lived in the lowland and coastal areas.

Then in 1945 came the French, then the Vietnamese communists, then more French. Next came the Americans -- first in small bands, then in full companies. Binh liked the Americans. They paid well, fought the communists and treated the tribal people better than the local Vietnamese did.

The job as a translator and interpreter initially paid $100 monthly, several times more than any other available job that summer. It was dangerous work. Some locals secretly were allied with the Viet Cong; others simply wanted to play one side against the other. Binh was shot and slightly wounded in a dispute with another soldier who accused him of being Viet Cong.

  Thin Binh, 1968
    Wesley Fisk
  Thin Binh attends the dedication of a new hospital near Camp Enari in Pleiku City, South Vietnam, in November 1968.

One medic stood out early on. The one who bothered to learn the language, to understand traditions. The soldier -- "you could hear him from far away," Binh recalled -- was noisy, chatty, friendly and liked the Montagnards. He treated them as people, his affection causing the other American soldiers to slightly ostracize him in the process. As a sign of respect, Binh introduced the medic to his girlfriend, Blin.

"He was respectful. He seemed to care about us," Binh said. "He was my friend."

Then one day, Fisk disappeared.

"I didn't know what happened to him," Binh said.

What Binh didn't learn until recently was this: While on patrol in 1969, almost exactly a year after he arrived, Fisk stepped into a small ravine and tore ligaments in his knee. He was sent first to a military hospital in Vietnam, then to Japan and then home. He never returned to the base.

Fisk soon settled back into his Seattle existence. He was discharged, rejoined the symphony, got married, had two children and developed a drinking problem. While in Vietnam, he had written a letter a day -- sometimes two -- to his parents. They saved them in a box.

"Because I wrote so much, I put the memories away," he said, thumbing through a box of letters recently. He produced a yellowed one dated Nov. 1, 1968:

"I really do believe the Montagnards are worth as much of our time and effort as possible to help repel the V.C. threat over here," he wrote.

* * *

What Fisk didn't know until recently was this: In Vietnam, life for Binh got considerably worse in 1975. The victorious North Vietnamese placed him in a labor detention camp, where he stayed until 1981, when most detainees were released. "It was hard labor," Binh said. "We would get up in the morning and dig and dig all day."

In the mid-1990s, a cousin agreed to help Binh's family get to the United States. He moved here with his wife, Blin -- the girlfriend he had introduced to Fisk -- and four of his seven children in 1996. He got a job with the PCC as a bagger and stocker. He attended college.

He didn't know Fisk lived two miles away. Their paths didn't intersect again until late March. Even in the same store, they didn't recognize each other until Fisk started talking. At the time, Fisk had a heavy beard. But The Voice -- it hadn't changed a bit.

"When I heard it, I started to get emotional," Binh said.

Since then, the two families have had regular dinners together, reading Fisk's old letters and viewing the several hundred slides he took while overseas. Binh's children never had seen pictures of their parents as young people. They laughed when they saw their 20-year-old dad and mom.

As for Fisk, he's reclaimed a part of his life he'd pushed aside. The first step was when he quit drinking for good in 1996. The second was when he needed toothpaste and picked a store he never uses.

Fisk knows The Voice stands out. He admitted that other symphony players -- people with some of the most finely tuned ears in Seattle -- do spot-on Wesley Fisk imitations.

He laughed as he said this. The Voice always has been a source of attention. But where would he be now without it?

 
P-I reporter Mike Lewis can be reached at 206-448-8140 or mikelewis@seattlepi.com

The Office of Attorney Ethics is caught protecting the law firms of lawyer committee members from legal malpractice.     http://www.americans-working-together.com/attorney_ethics/id50.html

 

"Support  Your  Troops  By  Supporting  Their  Benefits"

"Cut Benefits for Vets." Veterans' Disability Benefits Commission Set Up By Leaders of Congress
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
HONORABLE  VETERAN  MOCKED  FOR  HIS  PTSD
 
 

 
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PLEASE  PRESS  THE  ABOVE  PICTURE  FOR  AN  UPDATE  ON  THE  MARINE.
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
WHETHER  INTENTIONAL  OR  NOT...
 
Back in April 1971, as John Kerry was appearing on television talk shows around America condemning his brother and sister Vietnam vets for being Baby-Killers and Village-Burners, he was helping cover up the Duc Duc Massacre.    http://www.capveterans.com/the_duc_duc_resettlement_village
 
 

 
LEARN  THE  STORY  OF  HOW  A  DISABLED  VETERAN  FATHER  HAD  TO  FIGHT  HIS  OWN  LAWYERS  IN  ORDER  TO  SHARE  CUSTODY  OF  HIS  TWO  MINOR  CHILDREN... 
 
 
 
 
 

freedom_is_not_free.jpg

 
ALL AMERICANS  Better watch this inspiring reveille call.   Are you awake?   
      Leo
 
 
 
God Bless America;
 The Rights And and The Freedom,
 We fought for,
So Help me God.
 
GySgt Angelo Vitalone Sr.
Semper Fi

 
TODAY'S  BRAVE  AND  HONORABLE  MILITARY  IS  TOMORROW'S  VETERANS

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WITH  THE  HELP  OF  INTERNET  SUPPORTERS,
Former CAP Marine and Webmaster Jack Cunningham,
a  PTSD  Disabled  Vet  Takes  On  New  Jersey's  Office  Of  Attorney  Ethics'  Corruption...
 
The corruption starts at the top of New Jersey's Government.   Learn the corruption behind the five (5) year battle of an honorable, disabled veteran.        See the evidence at:    http://www.americans-working-together.com/id107.html
 
 
 

Official Website For The Combined Action Program (CAP)
 
 
 
TODAY'S  BRAVE  AND  HONORABLE  MILITARY  IS  TOMORROW'S  VETERANS
 
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A  HONORABLE,  DISABLED  CAP  VETERAN  OF  THE  VIETNAM  WAR  BATTLES  THE  STATE  OF  NEW  JERSEY  OVER  THE  LEGAL  MALPRACTICE  OF  ONE  OF  THEIR  VICE-CHAIRMAN  OF  ATTORNEY  ETHICS. 
 
 
 

PRESS PICTURE FOR LARGER COPY
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PRESS PICTURE FOR LARGER COPY

Above is Jack Cunningham with one of the boys from the Duc Duc Resettlement Village. 
 
 
Below is the full picture of the same scene.

PRESS PICTURE FOR LARGER COPY
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PRESS PICTURE FOR LARGER COPY

 
 

 
NEW JERSEY ATTORNEY ETHICS PROTECTS ONE OF THEIR VICE-CHAIRMAN AGAINST A HONORABLE VETERAN AND HIS CLEAR EVIDENCE. 

Local Heroes

December 20, 2004
By Andrew Borene

"I think that there is no greater gift than for a man
to be willing to risk his life for the freedom of strangers."


Op-Ed Contributor: Local Heroes

December 20, 2004
By ANDREW BORENE

Minneapolis - IF the Pentagon hopes to start bringing American troops home from Iraq while also increasing security there, it will have to find a way to do more with less. One approach could be expanding the Marine Corps combined-action program, an initiative that was successful in Vietnam and has shown early promise in Iraq.

The concept behind the program is that if American and foreign troops operate together, each will gain knowledge from the other as to the best way to counter an insurgency. In Vietnam, platoons were created that combined marines and Vietnamese militia members. The Americans were handpicked, chosen because they had shown particular respect for the local culture. They were expected to live in the villages they were assigned to defend, striving to "work themselves out of a job" by training their Vietnamese counterparts in police work and security operations.

The most striking success of the program was a rapid increase in actionable intelligence. Living in Vietnamese hamlets for months, the marines got a chance to get to know the locals, who in general had kept a careful neutrality in the war. This helped to humanize the American presence and reduced the passive support many civilians had been giving to Vietcong guerrillas. For many, their respect for (or fear of) the communist guerrillas waned, and they broke their silence about intelligence leads.

In the long run, it was one of the few efforts that managed to win some "hearts and minds" in Vietnam. Unfortunately, the top brass lost interest in the program in the early 1970's and, well, the rest is history.

Last year, under the leadership of Gen. James Mattis, members of the First Marine Division in western Iraq began adapting the program to aid poorly trained Iraqi National Guard and police forces. Although it is too soon to declare success, reports from the military and the news media suggest that Iraqis in the combined-action program perform better in combat, have higher morale and are considerably more reliable than their regular Iraqi military counterparts.

Expanding the program would be best accomplished by teaming coalition troops with Iraqi security troops, or even paramilitary groups as in Vietnam, and placing them in cities along the main supply routes. This would significantly bolster the coalition's ability to gauge popular sentiment and gather intelligence leads on the pursuit of enemy leaders. It would also reduce the high profile of the coalition forces.

While the situations in Vietnam and Iraq are not identical, when it comes to battling insurgents it is always vital to erase their advantages in popular support and local knowledge. A few good marines learned how to do that during Vietnam; perhaps trying it again in Iraq can bring about a different ending.

Andrew Borene, a law student at the University of Minnesota, was a first lieutenant with the Marine Expeditionary Force in Iraq. He is an adviser to Operation Truth, a veterans' advocacy group.

*******************************************************

http://www.CapVeterans.com

 

Hi!   My name is Shane and I'm two years old.   My father is in the Navy...   (Press HERE to learn more.)

 

THE LAST AMERICANS TO LIVE IN DUC DUC.
duc_duc_resettlement.jpg
THE LAST AMERICANS TO LIVE IN DUC DUC.
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
COMBINED  ACTION  PROGRAM  (CAP)
 
PLEASE  PRESS  THE  BELOW  LIFE  MAGAZINE  COVER  TO  LEARN  ABOUT  THE  VIETNAM  UNIT  THAT  HAD  THE  NICKNAME  "THE  PEACE  CORPS  VOLUNTEERS  WITH  RIFLES."
 
This Marine unit was so successful in Vietnam that it was activated for this new war on terrorism.

PLEASE PRESS THE BELOW ARTICLE TO READ
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PLEASE PRESS THE ABOVE ARTICLE TO READ

 
 

 
 
 
WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LAWYERS AND ATTORNEYS

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MORE DETAILS OF THE COMBINED ACTION PROGRAM (CAP)

 

MORE DETAILS ABOUT JACK AND GEORGE'S VILLAGE EXPERIENCES

 

THE  OFFICIAL  CAP  MARINE  WEBSITE    http://www.CapMarine.com

 

PRESS  HERE  TO  LINK  TO  PROUD  VIETNAM  VETERANS 

 

PLEASE  PRESS  HERE  TO  LEARN  A  LIST  OF  AMERICAN  CELEBRITIES,  WHO  REALLY  DO  CARE  ABOUT  AMERICA'S  VETERANS  AND  CURRENT  MILITARY
 

******************************************

 
 
A  PIECE  OF  FORGOTTEN  AMERICAN  HISTORY
 
THE  BATTLE  OF  MINISINK was such an embarrassment
to the Americans that it took 43 years,
before the bodies of the veterans were collected and buried.  
However, when these veterans did get buried with honors,
15,000 Americans showed up to give them their long, overdue respect.
 
                   HOSPITAL  ROCK,   MINISINK               
hospital_rock.jpg 
 
   Please press the link to learn the details.
 
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PLEASE  PRESS  HERE  TO  READ  MORE  ARTICLES  FROM  THE  VFW  MAGAZINE OF  MAY  2005
 
 
 
 
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What's missing from this below picture is a New York State Department of Transportation (DOT) Tunnel.  The tunnel was washed downstream about a half of a mile.

 
The above stream is cutting across a disabled vet's driveway...   It's a tough one to cross, especially during emergencies.
(Please help him get his state governor to answer his mail.  Learn how you can help from your computer at the below link.)
 
 
 
----------------------------------------------
 
 
HOW WOULD YOU FEEL IF THIS WAS YOUR FATHER'S  AND  MOTHER'S  GRAVE?
flooded_grave.jpg
 
DON'T  OUR  VETERANS  DESERVE  BETTER  THAN  FLOODED  GRAVES.
 
 

 
 
"In 1982, the public perception of a Vietnam vet was Sylvester Stallone's film character RAMBO, a mentally disturbed and thoroughly fictionalized ex-soldier."
 
 
VETS  WHO  MADE  A  DIFFERENCE
 
 
 
AGENT  ORANGE  IMPORTANT  INFORMATION
 
 

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agent_orange_eligible_for_exams.jpg

 

ALL  VIETNAM  VETERANS  ARE  ELIGIBLE  FOR  AGENT  ORANGE  EXAMS.
PLEASE  PASS  THIS  IMPORTANT  INFORMATION  TO  ALL  VIETNAM  VETERANS,  WHO  YOU  KNOW.

The poem listed on the below website is the  "Dear Vietnam Veteran"  Letter.

International War Veterans' Poetry Archives

 

IWVPA Header

IWVPA Divider

JACK CUNNINGHAM

United States Marine Corps
Phu Da, Vietnam
1970 - 1971

Jack Cunningham: Dear Vietnam Veteran


Visit Jack's website,
"Surrender Was Not an Option"

 
LETTER OF APOLOGY

Author unknown - sentiment shared.

For good and ill, the Iraqi prisoner abuse mess will remain an issue.  On the one hand, right thinking Americans will abhor the stupidity of the actions while on the other hand, political glee will take control and fashion this minor event into some modern day My Lai massacre. 

I heard some Arabs are asking for an apology.  I humbly offer mine here:

I am sorry that the last seven times we Americans took up arms and sacrificed the blood of our youth, it was in the defense of Muslims (Bosnia, Kosovo, Gulf War 1, Kuwait, etc.).

I am sorry that no such call for an apology upon the extremists came after 9/11.

I am sorry that all of the murderers on 9/11 were Arabs.

I am sorry that Arabs have to live in squalor under savage dictatorships.  I am sorry that their leaders squander their wealth.

I am sorry that their governments breed hate for the US in their religious schools.

I am sorry that Yassir Arafat was kicked out of every Arab country and hijacked the Palestinian "cause."

I am sorry that no other Arab country will take in or offer more than a token amount of financial help to those same Palestinians.

I am sorry that the USA has to step in and be the biggest financial supporter of poverty stricken Arabs while the insanely wealthy Arabs blame the USA.

I am sorry that our own left wing elite and our media can't understand any of this.

I am sorry the United Nations scammed the poor people of Iraq out of the "food for oil" money so they could get rich while the common folk suffered.

I am sorry that some Arab governments pay the families of homicide bombers upon their death.

I am sorry that those same bombers are seeking 72 virgins. I can't seem to find one here on Earth.

I am sorry that the homicide bombers think babies are a legitimate target.

I am sorry that our troops died to free more Arabs.

I am sorry they show so much restraint when their brothers in arms are killed. I am sorry that Muslim extremists have killed more Arabs than any other group.

I am sorry that foreign trained terrorists are trying to seize control of Iraq and return it to a terrorist state.

I am sorry we don't drop a few dozen "Daisy Cutters" on Fallujah.  (Note: a "Daisy Cutter" is a 10,000 lb bomb, used to clear helicopter landing zones)

I am sorry every time terrorists hide they find a convenient "Holy Site".

I am sorry they didn't apologize for driving a jet into the World Trade Center that collapsed and severely damaged Saint Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church - one of our Holy Sites.

I am sorry they didn't apologize for flight 93 and 175, the USS Cole, the embassy bombings, etc.

I am sorry Michael Moore is American; he could feed a medium sized village in Africa.

I am sorry the French are french?

America will get past this latest absurdity. We will punish those responsible because that is what we do.  We hang out our dirty laundry for all the world to see. We move on. That's one of the reasons we are hated so much.  We don't hide this stuff like all those Arab countries that are now demanding an apology.

Deep down inside, when most Americans saw this reported in the news, we were like - so what?  We lost hundreds and made fun of a few prisoners.  Sure, it was wrong, sure, it dramatically hurts our cause, but until captured we were trying to kill these same prisoners. Now we're supposed to wring our hands because a few were humiliated?  Our compassion is tempered with the vivid memories of our own people killed, mutilated and burnt amongst a joyous crowd of celebrating Fallujans.

If you want an apology from this American, you're going to have a long wait.  You have a better chance of finding those 72 virgins.

http://www.catsprn.com/letter_of_apology.htm