Pictures From The War In Iraq
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Troops in Vietnam: Reached a peak of 543,000 in the last year (1968) of the Johnson Administration
Iraq Is Next, Followed By The Other Nations Of The Region
A MOST SEE 9-11 MEMORIAL
AMERICANS WORKING TOGETHER
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On March 27, 2007, based on the communication strengths of the internet, an estimated 30,000 patriotic Americans from around the nation, came through an east coast snow and ice storm to stand together at the War Memorials for World War II, the Korea War and the Vietnam War.   These proud American flag-wavers stood, and still stand together in full support of America's men and women in military uniforms around the world.

Read the American Legion Magazine's article about the March 17, 2007 Gathering of Eagles.  (See pictures.)
 
 
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Why are the two teenage boys' in the below picture eyes closed?

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UNITED  STATES  MARINES  IN  VIETNAM

 

"Support  Your  Troops  By  Supporting  Their  Benefits"

"Cut Benefits for Vets." Veterans' Disability Benefits Commission Set Up By Leaders of Congress
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ALL AMERICANS  Better watch this inspiring reveille call.   Are you awake?   
      Leo
 
 
 
God Bless America;
 The Rights And and The Freedom,
 We fought for,
So Help me God.
 
GySgt Angelo Vitalone Sr.
Semper Fi

 

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HONORABLE  VETERAN  MOCKED  FOR  HIS  PTSD

 

Press  HERE  to  Read   How  Actor  Gary  Sinise  Tackles  the American  News  Media  on  Iraq

 

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PLEASE  PRESS  THE  ABOVE  PICTURE  FOR  AN  UPDATE  ON  THE  MARINE.

 

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TODAY'S  BRAVE  AND  HONORABLE  MILITARY  IS  TOMORROW'S  VETERANS

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United  States  Navy's  BLUE  ANGELS
 

 
 
The current American Military Men & Women make me damn proud of being called a vet, and an American. 
 
Whether, it is in The War on Terror or Katrina Relief, these brave men and women are  excellent  examples of American humanitarians.   I feel they are great ambassadors for all honorable, American veterans.
           Jack   http://www.CapVeterans.com
                      http://www.americans-working-together.com 
                      http://home.earthlink.net/~americans_who_lived_as_peasants 
 
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From:   Press Service
Sent: Wednesday, September 07, 2005 11:42 AM
Subject: Military Response to Katrina Intensifies
 
American Forces Press Service


Military Response to Katrina Intensifies

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, Sept. 7, 2005 The 60,000 U. S. military forces on the ground in the hurricane-decimated Gulf Coast region are carrying out President Bush's priorities -- saving, then sustaining lives -- before getting to the tasks of recovery and reconstruction, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said Sept. 6 during an interview on Fox News Channel.

Rumsfeld, who traveled to the region Sept. 4 to observe operations firsthand, addressed the "enormous effort going on down there" as 1,800 members of the 82nd Airborne Division and more than 1,600 1st Cavalry Division troops were joining the Hurricane Katrina relief operation.

This brings to 18,000 the number of active-duty forces committed to the mission, in addition to almost 43,000 National Guardsmen, U. S. Northern Command officials reported today.

An additional 5,400 active troops and 1,400 National Guard members are expected to flow into the region within the next 24 to 48 hours, DoD officials said.

Together, these forces are conducting humanitarian, search-and-rescue, evacuation and security missions, officials reported.

Rumsfeld said the Defense Department provided assets to support the effort "as rapidly as humanly possible" after being asked to do so and had taken steps to ensure it was prepared for a quick response.

"I would go so far as to say we were leaning so far forward that we were actually moving things and prepositioning things well before we were ever asked for them," he said.

In another new development, USS Tortuga was positioned pierside in New Orleans, where its crew is now conducting evacuations, distributing food and water, and transporting support troops, NORTHCOM officials said.

Tortuga is among 27 ships -- 20 Navy and seven Coast Guard -- now on station in the affected region. USS Whidbey Island delivered six floating bridges to replace those destroyed in New Orleans. In addition, USS Grapple is on station to support salvage and clearing operations in cooperation with the Coast Guard, DoD officials said.

The hospital ship USNS Comfort, capable of treating 250 patients, is scheduled to arrive Sept. 9, DoD homeland defense officials reported today.

In addition, 360 helicopters, half active duty and half National Guard; and 93 airplanes, 70 active duty and 23 National Guard, are also supporting the operation.

Joint Task Force Katrina (Forward), currently at Camp Shelby, Miss. , is slated to relocate to the USS Iwo Jima within 24 hours, officials reported.

DoD officials reported these additional operational highlights today:

  • DoD has provided extensive search-and-rescue, evacuation, and medical support, flying more than 5,200 sorties to date, evacuating 75,000 people, rescuing more than 14,000 people, evacuating 7,500 patients by ground and more than 2,500 by air, and treating more than 5,500 patients.
  • The Army Corps of Engineers closed the 17th Street Canal levee breach in New Orleans and began pumping operations Sept. 6. Corps staffers are now working to open the city's pump station number seven.
  • Mortuary affairs specialists are expected to arrive today at Camp Shelby to help the Federal Emergency Management Agency process the deceased.
  • The Armed Forces Institute of Pathology at Walter Reed Army Medical Center here is providing a specialized DNA team to help identify fatalities.
  • An Army element arrived at Camp Shelby equipped with airborne and ground loud speakers to assist with evacuation operations.
  • DoD provided 1,500 mobile radios and technical support to be used by officials in Mississippi and Louisiana.
  • Six installations are providing support as transportation staging areas for ice, water and medical supplies. Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. , is serving as DoD's central collection point for supplies donated by foreign countries.
  • Military Sealift Command contracted for one passenger ship to provide lodging for disaster victims and response personnel.
  • FEMA has ordered 21 million individually packaged military rations.
  • Field hospitals are providing 745 beds: 360 aboard USS Bataan, 260 aboard USS Iwo Jima, and 25 at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport.
  • Ten Department of Health and Human Services Federal Medical Shelters, each with 250 beds, have been located at DoD installations. Two shelters are at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. ; four at Fort Polk, La. ; and four at Meridian Naval Air Station, Miss.
  • The Air Force established one of three tent cities to be constructed at the airport in New Orleans.

Related Site:
Military Support in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina



NOTE: View the
original version of this web page on DefenseLINK, the official website of the U. S. Department of Defense.

Visit the Defense Department's Web site "America Supports You" at http://www.americasupportsyou.mil, that spotlights what Americans are doing in support of U.S. military men and women serving at home and abroad.

Visit the Defense Department's Web site for the latest news and information about America's response to the war against terrorism: "Defend America" at http://www.DefendAmerica.mil.


Unsubscribe from or Subscribe to this mailing list: http://www.defenselink.mil/news/subscribe.html


 

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Entertainment  From  Thousands  Of  Miles  Away...        Stuff  that  reads  GRAMMY  AWARD  all  over  it.
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From:   North, Jim
 
Subject:    USA!   USA!   USA!:   Troops at play...
(Singing and Dancing)

Please press the below link and turn on your computer's speakers.

 
 
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THE   BELOW  PICTURES,  STORIES  &  QUOTES;   YOU  WILL  NOT  SEE  OR  HEAR  THEM  ON  THE  MAJOR  AMERICAN  NEWS  OUTLETS...  ?       WHY??
 

Amnesty International: Insurgents are guilty

The Amnesty International report — "In Cold Blood: Abuses by Armed Groups" — said (terrorist) insurgents were guilty of direct attacks intended to cause the greatest possible loss of civilian life, indiscriminate attacks resulting in the deaths of civilians, targeting humanitarian organizations, abductions and killing captured and defenseless police and military personnel.

"There is no honor nor heroism in blowing up people going to pray or murdering a terrified hostage.  Those carrying out such acts are criminals, nothing less, whose actions undermine any claim they may have to be pursuing a legitimate cause," Amnesty said.

Sometimes in our everyday life we tend to forget what's going on elsewhere in the world and that the brave men and women of the service are just like you and I. They have family and friends back home who love them very much and are praying for their safe return.

Pictures you rarely see on the American news reports!!

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Romeo Gacad / AFP

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John Moore / AP

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Damir Salolj / Reuters

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John Moore / AP

 
 
DID  YOU  SLEEP  WELL  LAST  NIGHT...
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HONORABLE  VETERAN  MOCKED  FOR  HIS  PTSD
 
 

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HONORABLE  VETERAN  MOCKED  FOR  HIS  PTSD
 
 
 
THE  FEDERAL  DEPARTMENT  OF  VETERANS  AFFAIRS  (VA)  IS  INVESTIGATING  ME,  AS  WELL  AS  72,000  OTHER  DISABLED  VETERANS  FOR  PTSD  FRAUD.    Please press the next link to learn the details.      http://www.americans-working-together.com/id67.html
 
The below story is about some terrorist attacks on my CAP Team, two years before I got there.   It's a great story that highlights terrorists and what they are capable of doing.  Although the CAP Marines did their best, American politicians won the village for the terrorists in the end.  ( Pray the same thing does not happen in Iraq.   If it does happen, the terrorists will not stay in Iraq.  They will be in America next.  They have been here before. [ 9-11 ])
 
At the time of the TET 1968 attacks, the CAP Team was called NOVEMBER 3.   The team's name was later changed to CAP 2-9-2 and was changed from a stationary CAP to a mobile CAP.   A stationary CAP stayed in a small compound, where the communists knew was located.  A mobile CAP always moved around the village and seldom stayed in the same area in the village for more than 12 hours at a time. 
      I served on the last team of Americans who lived and served in this same village.   Less than a year after the last Americans left the village, communists burned it down, killing and wounding hundreds of innocent Vietnamese men, women and children. 
 
Marine Corps Gazette article about a TET 1968 attack on a CAP Team just outside the 5th Marines Combat Base at An Hoa.
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Why isn't the American News Media not covering these terrorist attacks on innocent Iraqis for what they are.  An evil that must be stopped. 
 
Instead, the News Media covers these daily massacres as if somehow, they would stop if America pulled out.  This implies that America is the root cause of these innocent murders.
 
During the Vietnam War, I faced terrorism on a daily basis, while I served in the Marine Corps'  Combined Action Program (CAP).  
 
LIFE Magazine did a great article on this unit and the terrorists, these Americans faced everyday.   Back during the Vietnam War, we were labelled as the evil ones by the American News Media;  and the Media is again trying to label today's honorable, brave men and women in uniform.
 
Seven months after the last Americans were pulled out from my village of  Duc Duc, terrorists massacred the village.
 
What do you think today's terrorists would do if America pulled out of Iraq?
      Jack Cunningham  http://www.CapVeterans.com
 
(You can see pictures below of the Combined Action Program (CAP) in Iraq today.)
 

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----- Original Message -----

 

Corporal Jeffrey H. Meighen, Civil Affairs Non-commissioned Officer,
                           5th Civil Affairs Group, 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, Regimental Combat Team-2, gets the chance to make a difference
                           in Iraqi children's lives during Operation Iraqi Freedom by handing out toys and hygiene products, participating in sporting
                           events and helping to rebuild their towns.  Meighen helps a child from a local Iraqi village put on a soccer jersey for a
                           game between the kids and Marines. Photo by: Lance Cpl. Zachary W. Lester
Civil Affairs Marine make a difference in Iraqi community
Submitted by: 2nd Marine Division
Story Identification #: 20058273558
Story by Lance Cpl. Zachary W. Lester



CAMP KOREAN VILLAGE, Iraq (August 2, 2005) -- The Marine, who plans to pursue an education degree, seems far from the classroom being deployed to Iraq, but he still gets the chance to work with children.

Corporal Jeffrey H. Meighen, civil affairs non-commissioned officer, 5th Civil Affairs Group, 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, goes out into the local communities and makes a difference in Iraqi children's lives during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

"I love being around kids, these kids are good kids," said Meighen. "They smile and seem comfortable with us."

Meighen sometimes participates in sporting events with the local children. He also hands out toys and hygiene products while working to help rebuild their towns.

The Southern Senior High School graduate conducts civil affairs missions to help people in the surrounding cities. As a part of CAG he helps restore critical infrastructure such as water, health services, schools and other projects that help improve the Iraqi living conditions.

"If those vital things are not up and running we push them to get them up and running through government funding," Meighen said.

The Harwood, Md. native and his CAG team go out two to three times a week to interact with the Iraqi-nationals. They recently set up a soccer game for the kids of a local village where
Marines put nets on empty goals and handed out jerseys, shorts, socks and even shoes.

"Basically I think the foundation for any society is the kids. If we show them now that we are not all bad, that we are not here to take away their freedom, but to liberate them, the kids will grow up knowing that and 20 years from now they will be the ones running the country," he said.

Meighen found his way into the Marine Corps and later to here after talking to a Marine recruiter on the way to the Air Force office.

"I figured that I would take advantage of everything I could while I was still young so I joined the Marine Corps," he said.

The 22-year-old is on his second deployment. During his first deployment he spent time in South America teaching several South American countries' soldiers non-lethal combat techniques and anti-terrorism awareness.

"I have seen a ton of progress. We came out here with a full plate of stuff to do and our civil affairs team leader has pushed hard to get a lot of those things done," Meighen said. "I just hope we make a difference here."

 

 
 
Entertainment  From  Thousands  Of  Miles  Away...        Stuff  that  reads  GRAMMY  AWARD  all  over  it.
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From:   North, Jim
 
Subject:    USA!   USA!   USA!:   Troops at play...
(Singing and Dancing)

Please press the below link and turn on your computer's speakers.

 
 
--------------------------------------

 
 
The American Military aims to remove the stigma from seeking therapy for post-combat stress.
(The story at the below link.)
 
PTSD has the real STIGMA.   Sadly, many Americans still have the image of Rambo in their minds, when it comes to PTSD Veterans...
 
This image must be replaced with the Truth...
 
 
 

 
----- Original Message -----
From:     VET66A@aol.com
 
U.S. Soldier Named Sheik by Iraqi Citizens
Horn Helped Arrange for Aid for Certain Villages
 
By ANTONIO CASTANEDA, AP    http://www.ap.org/

AP
Army Staff Sgt. Dale L. Horn was given five sheep and some land after being named a sheik.

Talk About It: Post Thoughts

QAYYARAH, Iraq (July 31) - Sheik Horn floats around the room in white robe and headdress, exchanging pleasantries with dozens of village leaders. But he's the only sheik with blonde streaks in his mustache - and the only one who attended country music star Toby Keith's recent concert in Baghdad with fellow U.S. soldiers.

Officially, he's Army Staff Sgt. Dale L. Horn, but to residents of the 37 villages and towns that he patrols he's known as the American sheik.

Sheiks, or village elders, are known as the real power in rural Iraq. And the 5-foot-6-inch Floridian's ascension to the esteemed position came through dry humor and the military's need to clamp down on rocket attacks.

Late last year a full-blown battle between insurgents and U.S. and Iraqi forces had erupted, and U.S. commanders assigned a unit to stop rocket and mortar attacks that regularly hit their base. Horn, who had been trained to operate radars for a field artillery unit, was now thrust into a job that largely hinged on coaxing locals into divulging information about insurgents.

Horn, 25, a native of Fort Walton Beach, Fla., acknowledges he had little interest in the region before coming here. But a local sheik friendly to U.S. forces, Dr. Mohammed Ismail Ahmed, explained the inner workings of rural Iraqi society on one of Horn's first Humvee patrols.

Horn says he was intrigued, and started making a point of stopping by all the villages, all but one dominated by Sunni Arabs, to talk to people about their life and security problems.

Moreover, he pressed for development projects in the area: he now boasts that he helped funnel $136,000 worth of aid into the area. Part of that paid for delivery of clean water to 30 villages during the broiling summer months.

"They saw that we were interested in them, instead of just taking care of the bases," Horn said.

Mohammed, Horn's mentor and known for his dry sense of humor, eventually suggested during a meeting of village leaders that Horn be named a sheik. The sheiks approved by voice vote, Horn said.

Some sheiks later gave him five sheep and a postage stamp of land, fulfilling some of the requirements for sheikdom. Others encouraged him to start looking for a second wife, which Horn's spouse back in Florida immediately vetoed.

But what may have originally started as a joke among crusty village elders has sprouted into something serious enough for 100 to 200 village leaders to meet with Horn each month to discuss security issues.

"They saw that we were interested in them, instead of just taking care of the bases."
-Army Staff Sgt. Dale L. Horn

And Horn doesn't take his responsibilities lightly. He lately has been prodding the Iraqi Education Ministry to pay local teachers, and he closely follows a water pipeline project that he hopes will ensure the steady flow of clean water to his villages.

"Ninety percent of the people in my area are shepherds or simple townspeople," said Horn. "They simply want to find a decent job to make enough money to provide food and a stable place for their people to live."

To Horn's commanders, his success justifies his unorthodox approach: no rockets have hit their base in the last half year.

"He has developed a great relationship with local leaders," said Lt. Col. Bradley Becker, who commands the 2nd Battalion, 8th Field Artillery Regiment. "They love him. They're not going to let anyone shoot at Sheik Horn."

He has even won occasional exemption from the military dress code - villagers provide a changing room where he can change from desert camouflage to robes upon arrival.

There are downsides. In his small trailer on base, Horn keeps antibiotics to take after unhygienic village meals.

"I still refuse to kiss him," joked Becker, referring to the cheek-kissing greetings exchanged among sheiks. "He doesn't have any sheep - he can't be a sheik," said Becker, apparently unaware of the recent donation of the small flock.

Some may say he's doing a tongue-in-cheek Lawrence of Arabia, but Horn says he doesn't know much about the legendary British officer who led the Arab revolt against the Ottoman Empire in World War I.

He acknowledges some villagers are offended at seeing a foreign soldier in clothing usually reserved for elders, but he says this has diminished over time.

The sheiks told Horn they will give him an official document deeming him a sheik before he goes home in about two months. He plans to frame it.

And the robe? "Maybe I'll put it in the closet and wear it on occasion," Horn said.

By ANTONIO CASTANEDA, AP    http://www.ap.org/

 

 

PLEASE  PRESS  THE  NEXT  LINK  TO  LEARN  ABOUT  A  MASSACRE  THAT  THE  AMERICAN  NEWS  MEDIA  DID  NOT  COVER.

PLEASE PRESS THE PICTURE FOR A LARGER PICTURE

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http://home.earthlink.net/~ducducvietnamfriends/an_unknown_massacre_in_vietnam/id8.html
 
 

 
I copied the below pictures and narratives directly from the official website of the United States Marine Corps.

87% Caption:
Cpl. Timothy R. Perea, a patrol leader for Combined Action Program, based in the outskirts of Al Kharma, gives orders to one of his Marines during a joint patrol with Company D, 505th Battalion, Iraqi National Guard July 27. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/02/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

87% Caption:
Civilians in a local store look on as Cpl. Timothy R. Perea, a patrol leader for Combined Action Program, and his radio operator Pfc. Jason T. Gomez, lead a joint patrol with Company D, 505th Battalion, Iraq National Guard in Al Kharma July 27.. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/02/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

87% Caption:
Cpl. Timothy R. Perea, a patrol leader for Combined Action Program, and his radio operator Pfc. Jason T. Gomez, lead a joint patrol with Company D, 505th Battalion, Iraq National Guard in Al Kharma July 27.. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/02/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

87% Caption:
A platoon sergeant with Company D, 505th Battalion, Iraqi National Guard runs his platoon during physical training at Camp Delta. The camp is run by Marines and ING soldiers as part of a Combined Action Program. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/01/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

86% Caption:
A Marine keeps his distance from the Iraqi soldier and interperter ahead of him during a joint foot patrol in Al Kharma, Iraq July 27. Marines of Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment and soldiers with Company D, 505th Battalion, Iraq National Guard teamed together as part of Combined Action Program in the outskirts of the city (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/02/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

86% Caption:
Marines of Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, fall back to the rear of a formation for platoon physical training at Camp Delta. Marines and Iraqi soldiers revived a Vietnam-era concept of working, training, living and fighting alonsgide one another through the Combined Action Program. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/01/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

86% Caption:
Cpl. Scott T. Nelson, looks on at his Iraqi platoon prior to kicking off physical training at Camp Delta. The camp is run by Marines of Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marines Regiment, and soldiers of Company D, 505th Battalion, Iraqi National Guard as part of a Combined Action Program. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/01/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

86% Caption:
Cpl. Kenneth L. Bryant, a squad leader with Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, helps an Iraqi soldier during physical training at Camp Delta. The camp is run by Marines and their Iraqi counterparts with Company D, 505th Battalion, Iraqi National Guard, as part of a Combined Action Program. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/01/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

86% Caption:
Cpl. Scott T. Nelson, a forward observer for Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, runs with soldiers with Company D, 505th Battalion, Iraqi National Guard. Marines and Iraqi soldiers physically train together at Camp Delta. The camp is run by Marines and their Iraqi counterparts as part of a Combined Action Program. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/01/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

86% Caption:
A soldier with Company D, 505th Battalion, Iraqi National Guard takes his turn to assemble and disassemble an AK-47 rifle during weapons training classes at Camp Delta. The camp is manned by Marines from Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment and Iraqi soldiers as part of a Combined Action Program where both forces live and train together. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/01/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

86% Caption:
An Iraqi civilian paints a new Iraqi National Guard sign on the Camp Delta headquarters building. Marines and Iraqi soldiers are living, training and fighting together under a Vietnam-era concept called the Combined Action Program. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/01/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

86% Caption:
Cpl. Kenneth L. Bryant, a squad leader with Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, goes over a personnel roster with an Iraqi soldier during morning formation at Camp Delta. The camp is run by Marines and their Iraqi counterparts with Company D, 505th Battalion, Iraqi National Guard, as part of a Combined Action Program. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/01/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

86% Caption:
Lance Cpl. Jesus E. Martinez, a mortarman serving as an armorer with Weapons Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment retrieves a weapon during weapons check-in at Camp Delta, in Al Kharma. Marine borrowed a tactic from the Vietnam War and re-employed the Combine Action Program, a concept where Marines and Iraqis work, live, train and fight alongside one another. (USMC photo by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen)
Photo taken 08/01/2004 by Sgt. Jose E. Guillen
click on photo to open photo document and see photo information

 
 
I copied these pictures directly from the official website of the United States Marine Corps.
 
 
I found this great PTSD article on a military base.   It was in a FAMILY MAGAZINE for American troops.
 
PTSD does not only hit our military men and women.    It impacts a great number of Americans, who never left home...
Child abuse, elderly abuse, marital abuse, street crime victims (rape),  (And now, even Terrorist Attacks) are some of the biggest sufferers.   
       I'm sure , many of the survivors of 9-11 and the survivors of the recent terrorist attacks in England are finding it hard dealing with everyday life.   Even those not directly involved can suffer a degree of PTSD.    (Many average New Yorkers can relate.   PTSD is a side effect of terror.)
 
Please take the time to read about PTSD.    If not treated, PTSD can spread to those around the original sufferers.
Understanding PTSD is a great way from keeping it from passing down through generations.

 
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Why are the two teenage boys' in the below picture eyes closed?

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CIRCUIT  CITY  SHORT  CIRCUITS  AMERICA'S  MILITARY
Do you do business with them?
Learn the details at: 
 

 
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VA and Leaders of Major Veterans Organizations Urge Veterans to Wear Medals on Veterans Day     Read the details at:   http://www.americans-working-together.com/american_veterans

 

 
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SENATOR  JOHN  KERRY'S  MILITARY  DISCHARGE -  THE  JIMMY  CARTER  LEGACY  CONTINUES
(It's not about what John Kerry did while serving in Vietnam.   It's about what Kerry said, and did after.)
 
 

 
HONORABLE  VETERAN  MOCKED  FOR  HIS  PTSD
 
 

Press  HERE  to  Read   How  Actor  Gary  Sinise  Tackles  the American  News  Media  on  Iraq

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TODAY'S  BRAVE  AND  HONORABLE  MILITARY  IS  TOMORROW'S  VETERANS

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WITH  THE  HELP  OF  INTERNET  SUPPORTERS,
Former CAP Marine and Webmaster Jack Cunningham,
a  PTSD  Disabled  Vet  Takes  On  New  Jersey's  Office  Of  Attorney  Ethics'  Corruption...
 
The corruption starts at the top of New Jersey's Government.   Learn the corruption behind the five (5) year battle of an honorable, disabled veteran.        See the evidence at:    http://www.americans-working-together.com/id107.html

 
 

 
LETTER OF APOLOGY

Author unknown - sentiment shared.

For good and ill, the Iraqi prisoner abuse mess will remain an issue.  On the one hand, right thinking Americans will abhor the stupidity of the actions while on the other hand, political glee will take control and fashion this minor event into some modern day My Lai massacre.   *

I heard some Arabs are asking for an apology.  I humbly offer mine here:

I am sorry that the last seven times we Americans took up arms and sacrificed the blood of our youth, it was in the defense of Muslims (Bosnia, Kosovo, Gulf War 1, Kuwait, etc.).

I am sorry that no such call for an apology upon the extremists came after 9/11.

I am sorry that all of the murderers on 9/11 were Arabs.

I am sorry that Arabs have to live in squalor under savage dictatorships.  I am sorry that their leaders squander their wealth.

I am sorry that their governments breed hate for the US in their religious schools.

I am sorry that Yassir Arafat was kicked out of every Arab country and hijacked the Palestinian "cause."

I am sorry that no other Arab country will take in or offer more than a token amount of financial help to those same Palestinians.

I am sorry that the USA has to step in and be the biggest financial supporter of poverty stricken Arabs while the insanely wealthy Arabs blame the USA.

I am sorry that our own left wing elite and our media can't understand any of this.

I am sorry the United Nations scammed the poor people of Iraq out of the "food for oil" money so they could get rich while the common folk suffered.

I am sorry that some Arab governments pay the families of homicide bombers upon their death.

I am sorry that those same bombers are seeking 72 virgins. I can't seem to find one here on Earth.

I am sorry that the homicide bombers think babies are a legitimate target.

I am sorry that our troops died to free more Arabs.

I am sorry they show so much restraint when their brothers in arms are killed. I am sorry that Muslim extremists have killed more Arabs than any other group.

I am sorry that foreign trained terrorists are trying to seize control of Iraq and return it to a terrorist state.

I am sorry we don't drop a few dozen "Daisy Cutters" on Fallujah.  (Note: a "Daisy Cutter" is a 10,000 lb bomb, used to clear helicopter landing zones)

I am sorry every time terrorists hide they find a convenient "Holy Site".

I am sorry they didn't apologize for driving a jet into the World Trade Center that collapsed and severely damaged Saint Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church - one of our Holy Sites.

I am sorry they didn't apologize for flight 93 and 175, the USS Cole, the embassy bombings, etc.

I am sorry Michael Moore is American; he could feed a medium sized village in Africa.

I am sorry the French are french?

America will get past this latest absurdity. We will punish those responsible because that is what we do.  We hang out our dirty laundry for all the world to see. We move on. That's one of the reasons we are hated so much.  We don't hide this stuff like all those Arab countries that are now demanding an apology.

Deep down inside, when most Americans saw this reported in the news, we were like - so what?  We lost hundreds and made fun of a few prisoners.  Sure, it was wrong, sure, it dramatically hurts our cause, but until captured we were trying to kill these same prisoners. Now we're supposed to wring our hands because a few were humiliated?  Our compassion is tempered with the vivid memories of our own people killed, mutilated and burnt amongst a joyous crowd of celebrating Fallujans.

If you want an apology from this American, you're going to have a long wait.  You have a better chance of finding those 72 virgins.

http://www.catsprn.com/letter_of_apology.htm

*    News coverage of the My Lai Massacre was a cover for another massacre that the American news media did not cover.  http://home.earthlink.net/~ducducvietnamfriends/an_unknown_massacre_in_vietnam/

 
 
 
TODAY'S  BRAVE  AND  HONORABLE  MILITARY  IS  TOMORROW'S  VETERANS
 
 

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Local Heroes

December 20, 2004
By Andrew Borene

"I think that there is no greater gift than for a man
to be willing to risk his life for the freedom of strangers."


Op-Ed Contributor: Local Heroes

December 20, 2004
By ANDREW BORENE

Minneapolis - IF the Pentagon hopes to start bringing American troops home from Iraq while also increasing security there, it will have to find a way to do more with less. One approach could be expanding the Marine Corps combined-action program, an initiative that was successful in Vietnam and has shown early promise in Iraq.

The concept behind the program is that if American and foreign troops operate together, each will gain knowledge from the other as to the best way to counter an insurgency. In Vietnam, platoons were created that combined marines and Vietnamese militia members. The Americans were handpicked, chosen because they had shown particular respect for the local culture. They were expected to live in the villages they were assigned to defend, striving to "work themselves out of a job" by training their Vietnamese counterparts in police work and security operations.

The most striking success of the program was a rapid increase in actionable intelligence. Living in Vietnamese hamlets for months, the marines got a chance to get to know the locals, who in general had kept a careful neutrality in the war. This helped to humanize the American presence and reduced the passive support many civilians had been giving to Vietcong guerrillas. For many, their respect for (or fear of) the communist guerrillas waned, and they broke their silence about intelligence leads.

In the long run, it was one of the few efforts that managed to win some "hearts and minds" in Vietnam. Unfortunately, the top brass lost interest in the program in the early 1970's and, well, the rest is history.

Last year, under the leadership of Gen. James Mattis, members of the First Marine Division in western Iraq began adapting the program to aid poorly trained Iraqi National Guard and police forces. Although it is too soon to declare success, reports from the military and the news media suggest that Iraqis in the combined-action program perform better in combat, have higher morale and are considerably more reliable than their regular Iraqi military counterparts.

Expanding the program would be best accomplished by teaming coalition troops with Iraqi security troops, or even paramilitary groups as in Vietnam, and placing them in cities along the main supply routes. This would significantly bolster the coalition's ability to gauge popular sentiment and gather intelligence leads on the pursuit of enemy leaders. It would also reduce the high profile of the coalition forces.

While the situations in Vietnam and Iraq are not identical, when it comes to battling insurgents it is always vital to erase their advantages in popular support and local knowledge. A few good marines learned how to do that during Vietnam; perhaps trying it again in Iraq can bring about a different ending.

Andrew Borene, a law student at the University of Minnesota, was a first lieutenant with the Marine Expeditionary Force in Iraq. He is an adviser to Operation Truth, a veterans' advocacy group.

 
 
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A  "PRO SE"   PTSD  VIETNAM  VET  WINS  A  LEGAL  MALPRACTICE  CASE  AGAINST  A  VICE-CHAIRMAN  OF  ATTORNEY  ETHICS.

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A  PIECE  OF  FORGOTTEN  AMERICAN  HISTORY
 
THE  BATTLE  OF  MINISINK.
 
HOSPITAL  ROCK
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   Please press the link to learn the details.
 
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A few years back, I wrote to a good number of American Celebrities asking for support for American Hospitalized Veterans.  Sadly, most did not even return a response.  However, those celebrities, who did send something back, more than made up for those, who did not...

Recently, I came across pictures of two of the American Celebrities who did, and I want to share their pictures with you.     http://home.earthlink.net/~americans_who_lived_as_peasants/id20.html

It's nice to know who your friends are.

Jack   http://www.CapVeterans.com

 

PLEASE  PRESS  THE  LINK   TO  LEARN  ABOUT  THE  DUC  DUC   RESETTLEMENT  VILLAGE  MASSACRE
 
 
SURRENDER  WAS  NEVER  AN  OPTION
The Vietnam War Experiences of a Proud Vietnam Vet.
 
 
COMBINED  ACTION  PROGRAM  (CAP)
 
PLEASE  PRESS  THE  BELOW  LIFE  MAGAZINE  COVER  TO  LEARN  ABOUT  THE  VIETNAM  UNIT  THAT  HAD  THE  NICKNAME  "THE  PEACE  CORPS  VOLUNTEERS  WITH  RIFLES."
 
This unit was so successful against terrorists in Vietnam that the unit has been activated in this new war on terrorism. 

PLEASE PRESS THE BELOW ARTICLE TO READ
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PLEASE PRESS THE ABOVE ARTICLE TO READ
 
 

 
 
PLEASE  PRESS  HERE  TO  LEARN  A  LIST  OF  AMERICAN  CELEBRITIES,  WHO  REALLY  DO  CARE  ABOUT  AMERICA'S  VETERANS  AND  CURRENT  MILITARY
 

For reasons unknown, even during the Vietnam War, the American News Media seldom ran pictures that hightlighted the human-side of our troops.  The below picture clearly highlights the Marines in the picture are weaponless, yet they are LIVING in a peasant-farming village under the Combined Action Program (CAP).  (Their weapons are near by.)
 
Many times, the villagers were the actual protectors of the Marines.

Picture From A Vietnamese Peasant-Farming Village
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Please Press The Above Picture To View More Pictures

GOD BLESS OUR MEN & WOMEN IN UNIFORM

CAProductions  -  Americans Working Together For A Change In Hollywood   http://home.earthlink.net/~proudcapmarine/caproductions/

"Surrender Was Not An Option" True American History   http://www.CapVeterans.com

Some Faces on "The Wall" in Washington   http://home.earthlink.net/~memorial_of_honor

It Will Never Be Forgotten   http://home.earthlink.net/~rosedalememorial/mem_001.htm

The Massarce   http://home.earthlink.net/~ducducvietnamfriends/duc_duc_001.htm

Dear Vietnam Veteran, Love America   http://home.earthlink.net/~dearvietnamveteran