American Legion Paradise Post 149 (Las Vegas, Nevada)
In Flanders Field
Home
Post Officers
Post Home and Meeting Hall
Our Post History
Code of Conduct
American Legion Riders
The American Legion Auxiliary
What We Do
How to Join
Calendar, News and Information
Photo Gallery
Post Everlasting (in Memorium)
Member's Businesses, Discounts, and Other Sponsors
Operation Vegas Heroes
Cub Scout Pack 149 (BSA)
Boys and Girls State
Links and Resources
Cell Phones for Soldiers
149 Club
Post 149 Around the World
Patriotic Information
U.S. Flag Code
My Name Is Old Glory
Military Birthdays and Order of Precedence
In Flanders Field
On Rosecrans Hill
December 7, 1941

Flanders Field Official Site of the American Battles Monument Commission.

By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918)
Canadian Army

            Capt John McCraeClick to return to the frontpage of 'The Heritage'
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The poppy, as a memorial flower to the war dead, can be traced to a single individual, Miss Moina Michael of the American Legion Ladies Auxiliary.  In November of 1918, Miss Michael bought a bouquet of poppies and started handing them out to businessmen in New York.

Miss Michael was so moved by Col. McRae's poem, that she penned a response:

... the blood of heroes never dies

But lends a luster to the red

of the flower that blooms above the dead

In Flander's Field.

Flanders Field, Ypres, Belgium,
December 8, 1915
Click for the handwritten copy of In Flanders Fields

Flanders Field American Cemetery and Memorial

Click to return to the frontpage of 'The Heritage'

The most asked question is: why poppies?

Wild poppies flower when other plants in their direct neighbourhood are dead. Their seeds can lie on the ground for years and years, but only when there are no more competing flowers or shrubs in the vicinity (for instance when someone firmly roots up the ground), these seeds will sprout.

There was enough rooted up soil on the battlefield of the Western Front; in fact the whole front consisted of churned up soil. So in May 1915, when McCrae wrote his poem, around him bloodred poppies blossemed like no one had ever seen before.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

HOME