News and Opinion for Democrats Against Bush - Part I b
The Mechanics of Our Democracy Cry Out for Reform
Pt. I b BUSH'S CONGRESS
NEO-CONSERVATIVES' ULTIMATE GOAL
RIGGING ELECTIONS
------ Reforms needed
-- Corrupt Redistricting
---- Texas
---- Colorado
---- Pennsylvania
-- Rigged E-Voting?
---- Diebold For Bush
-- Delayed Disclosures
RAW POWER TACTICS
-- Bullying to Win
---- Threatening Dems
---- Bribing Republican
-- Excluding Democrats
---- 11th-Hour Bills
---- 1-Vote Victories
LOOTING the FUTURE
-- Driving Up Deficit
-- Extra Pork in Bills
-- $87 bill. Blank Check
BAD BILLS
-- Energy Bill
-- Medicare Bill
-- Spending Bill
WHO BENEFITS?
-- Wealthy Interests
-- Cheney's Cronies
-- Bush Camp'n Donors
-- Gun Lobby
WHAT ARE WE LOSING?
-- Privacy Rules
-- Academic Freedom
---- at the U. of Wash.
-- States' Rights on..
---- Air Quality
---- Antispam Rules
---- ID Protection
---- Gay Marriage
---- Scholarships
STATES FIGHT BACK
-- Brandeis's Support

' Thomas Jefferson advised that "elective government" is "the best permanent corrective of the errors or abuses of those entrusted with power." His faith in democracy was well placed, but for elective government to play this critical role, the elections must be inclusive and fair, and they must use machinery that works. '

New York Times -  January 18, 2004

Fixing Democracy

The complete article (1290 words) may be purchased online from the New York Times archives at--  http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FB0915FF3D5D0C7B8DDDA80894DC404482

Quotes

he morning after the 2000 election, Americans woke up to a disturbing realization: our electoral system was too flawed to say with certainty who had won. Three years later, things may actually be worse. If this year's presidential election is at all close, there is every reason to believe that there will be another national trauma over who the rightful winner is, this time compounded by troubling new questions about the reliability of electronic voting machines.

This is no way to run a democracy. ...

Throughout this presidential election year, we will be taking a close look at the mechanics of our democracy and highlighting aspects that cry out for reform. Among the key issues:

Voting Technology

An accurate count of the votes cast is the sine qua non of a democracy, but one that continues to elude us. As now-discredited punch-card machines are being abandoned, there has been a shift to electronic voting machines with serious reliability problems of their own. . ...

Voter Participation

Our ideal of government with the consent of the governed presumes universal participation in elections, or something close to it. ....

Competitive Elections

The founders intended the House of Representatives to be the branch most responsive to the passions of the people. But with the rise of partisan gerrymandering, redistricting to favor the party in control of the process, competitive House elections are becoming virtually obsolete. ...

Thomas Jefferson advised that "elective government" is "the best permanent corrective of the errors or abuses of those entrusted with power." His faith in democracy was well placed, but for elective government to play this critical role, the elections must be inclusive and fair, and they must use machinery that works.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/18/opinion/18SUN1.html?

 

 

 

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 FAIR USE NOTICE  
  This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.