News and Opinion for Democrats Against Bush - Part I b
It Took Bullying to Win Medicare Bill
Pt. I b BUSH'S CONGRESS
NEO-CONSERVATIVES' ULTIMATE GOAL
RIGGING ELECTIONS
------ Reforms needed
-- Corrupt Redistricting
---- Texas
---- Colorado
---- Pennsylvania
-- Rigged E-Voting?
---- Diebold For Bush
-- Delayed Disclosures
RAW POWER TACTICS
-- Bullying to Win
---- Threatening Dems
---- Bribing Republican
-- Excluding Democrats
---- 11th-Hour Bills
---- 1-Vote Victories
LOOTING the FUTURE
-- Driving Up Deficit
-- Extra Pork in Bills
-- $87 bill. Blank Check
BAD BILLS
-- Energy Bill
-- Medicare Bill
-- Spending Bill
WHO BENEFITS?
-- Wealthy Interests
-- Cheney's Cronies
-- Bush Camp'n Donors
-- Gun Lobby
WHAT ARE WE LOSING?
-- Privacy Rules
-- Academic Freedom
---- at the U. of Wash.
-- States' Rights on..
---- Air Quality
---- Antispam Rules
---- ID Protection
---- Gay Marriage
---- Scholarships
STATES FIGHT BACK
-- Brandeis's Support

"Before long it became clear that an absolute majority of the House -- 218 of the 435 members -- had voted no, with only 216 in favor. But the vote stayed open until Republicans were able to bludgeon two of their members to switch sides. It took two hours and 51 minutes, the longest roll call in modern House history."

washingtonpost.com

[Malaise]                                                                                      . . . And Mischief

By Norman Ornstein

The complete article is currently (3/24/04) available on the Washington Post website at-- http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&node=&contentId=A14900-2003Nov25&notFound=true [found on this date through a Google search by article title]

Wednesday, November 26, 2003; Page A25

Quote--

One of the most disgraceful moments in American sports came in the 1972 Olympics, when officials gave the Soviet Union's basketball team three chances to shoot the ball after the clock had apparently run out -- allowing it to defeat the U.S. team.

American politics now has its own version of that infamous game. Early last Sunday, starting at about 3 a.m., the House of Representatives began its roll call on the Medicare prescription drug plan -- the most significant vote of the year. The House votes by electronic device, with each vote normally taking 15 minutes. After the allotted time, the bill, supported by the president and the Republican leadership, was losing. The vote stayed open. Before long it became clear that an absolute majority of the House -- 218 of the 435 members -- had voted no, with only 216 in favor. But the vote stayed open until Republicans were able to bludgeon two of their members to switch sides. It took two hours and 51 minutes, the longest roll call in modern House history. ...

In the 22 years that Democrats ran the House after the electronic voting system was put in place, there was only one time when the vote period substantially exceeded the 15 minutes. ....

 

The writer is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.

2003 The Washington Post Company
 
Archived Washington Post articles may be purchased online at-- http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/washingtonpost/search.html?nav=left

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