Electronic Voting - A Non-Partisan Issue
New Coded Ballots May Prove Your Vote Counted
ELECTRONIC VOTING
DANGERS of E-VOTING
--- Warnings
--- Democracy at Stake
--- Report from UK
"BLACK BOX VOTING"
--- Work of Bev Harris
------ Get Book Free!
VOTER-VERIFIED PAPER BALLOTS
--- Bev Harris's Sites
Or -- "Voter-Verifiable Paper Trail"
HELP FROM HR 2239
--- Republican Sponsors
--- Legal Support
--- Bev H. Comments
... INTERIM SOLUTION
WHY PRIVATIZE VOTING AT ALL?
WHY NOT RETURN to PAPER BALLOTS?
DIEBOLD WARS
------ Diebold Gives In!
------ Bev H.Comments
--- Diebold for Bush
NOT JUST DIEBOLD
IS eSLATE BETTER?
--- Potential Problems
NEW POSSIBILITY-- VOTING with "FROGS"

"With frogs, as with a voter-verified paper trail, voters would still have to trust people to secure the counting process. Mathematical voting systems — developed independently by Dr. Neff and Dr. David Chaum, an independent cryptographer and privacy expert — would ensure that votes were correctly counted, even in the presence of untrustworthy machines and officials."

New York Times - March 2, 2004

Did Your Vote Count? New Coded Ballots May Prove It Did

By SARA ROBINSON
 
The complete article is currently (3/28/04) available on the votehere.net website at-- http://www.votehere.net/NYTimes-DidYourVoteCount.pdf
 
Quotes--

More than two centuries of elections in the United States have resulted in paper-based voting systems secured by a multitude of checks and procedures. New electronic voting systems require voters to trust computers and the people who program them, a trust that computer security experts say is unwarranted.

The subject is not hypothetical. Millions of voters will cast ballots on electronic machines today in the biggest test so far of the technology. To address security concerns, researchers are proposing new ways of voting that do not require voter trust in people or software. ...

One such solution, soon to be mandated in several states, is a voter-verified paper trail.

Dr. Rebecca Mercuri, a research fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, proposed a method that would require voting machines to produce paper printouts of the filled-in ballots, which would be checked by voters before being deposited in the ballot boxes. Only the paper ballots would be counted, bypassing the need to trust the voting machine.

An alternative is the "frog" voting system, proposed in a working paper released by the Caltech/M.I.T. Voting Technology Project in 2001. An all-electronic version of this approach — described by Dr. Rivest, Dr. Shuki Bruck of the California Institute of Technology and Dr. David Jefferson of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory — would use two different types of electronic voting machines and a simple memory card, the frog. ...

 
 
 
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 FAIR USE NOTICE  
  This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.